A History Of France 1460 1560 PDF EPUB Download

A History Of France 1460 1560 also available in docx and mobi. Read A History Of France 1460 1560 online, read in mobile or Kindle.

A History of France, 1460-1560

The Emergence of a Nation-State

Author: David Potter

Publisher: Macmillan

ISBN:

Category: History

Page: 438

View: 945

A survey of French history from the reign of Louis XI to the outbreak of the Wars of Religion that isolates some of the controversial theories of the period: state building, nobility and clientage and the Reformation and discusses them with full attention to the regional diversity of France. It also introduces the reader to recent research on the court and government set in the context of the basic social and economic movements of the period. It is argued that the basic identity of France as a nation was reinforced under the aegis of monarchical legitimacy backed by the nobility and the church, setting the pattern for the rest of the Ancien Regime.

A History of France

Author: Joseph Bergin

Publisher: Macmillan International Higher Education

ISBN:

Category: History

Page: 320

View: 342

Few modern countries can boast of such a lengthy history as France, a staple of European maps for the last millennium. This engaging narrative analyses French political, social and cultural history since 987, in a single volume. Through revolution, war and peace, it explores how the Frankland of 1000AD has grown into the France we know today.

A Concise History of France

Author: Roger Price

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

ISBN:

Category: History

Page: 491

View: 865

This book provides a clear and up-to-date guide to French history from the early middle ages to the present--from Charlemagne to Chirac. Among the book's central themes are the relationship between state and society, the impact of war and the use of political power. This second edition, substantially re-written to take account of recent research, includes a new chapter on contemporary France; a society and political system in crisis as a result of globalisation, international terrorism, racial tension and a loss of confidence in political leaders.

A Social History of France 1780-1914

Second Edition

Author: Peter McPhee

Publisher: Macmillan International Higher Education

ISBN:

Category: History

Page: 368

View: 132

This volume provides a lively and authoritative synthesis of recent work on the social history of France and is now thoroughly updated to cover the 'long nineteenth century' from 1789-1914. Peter McPhee offers both a readable narrative and a distinctive, coherent argument about this remarkable century and explores key themes such as: - peasant interaction with the environment - the changing experience of work and leisure - the nature of crime and protest - changing demographic patterns and family structures - the religious practices of workers and peasants - the ideology and internal repercussions of colonisation. At the core of this social history is the exercise and experience of 'social relations of power' - not only because in these years there were four periods of protracted upheaval, but also because the history of the workplace, of relations between women and men, adults and children, is all about human interaction. Stimulating and enjoyable to read, this indispensable introduction to nineteenth-century France will help readers to make sense of the often bewildering story of these years, while giving them a better understanding of what it meant to be an inhabitant of France during that turbulent time.

France

Author: Britannica Educational Publishing

Publisher: Britanncia Educational Publishing

ISBN:

Category: Juvenile Nonfiction

Page: 376

View: 401

France’s cultural and historical legacies are numerous and diverse. It has long played a dominant role on the world stage, and as one of the largest countries of the European Union, its global influence shows no signs of dying down. But despite its cultural, economic, governmental, and historical achievements, France has experienced trials and tribulations, perhaps most memorably during the French Revolution, but throughout history as well. This comprehensive volume surveys France’s assorted regions, its renowned traditions, the individuals and peoples that have led it to greatness, and the struggles and successes of its past and present.

The Myth of Religious Violence

Secular Ideology and the Roots of Modern Conflict

Author: William T Cavanaugh

Publisher: Oxford University Press

ISBN:

Category: Religion

Page: 296

View: 444

The idea that religion has a dangerous tendency to promote violence is part of the conventional wisdom of Western societies, and it underlies many of our institutions and policies, from limits on the public role of religion to efforts to promote liberal democracy in the Middle East. William T. Cavanaugh challenges this conventional wisdom by examining how the twin categories of religion and the secular are constructed. A growing body of scholarly work explores how the category 'religion' has been constructed in the modern West and in colonial contexts according to specific configurations of political power. Cavanaugh draws on this scholarship to examine how timeless and transcultural categories of 'religion and 'the secular' are used in arguments that religion causes violence. He argues three points: 1) There is no transhistorical and transcultural essence of religion. What counts as religious or secular in any given context is a function of political configurations of power; 2) Such a transhistorical and transcultural concept of religion as non-rational and prone to violence is one of the foundational legitimating myths of Western society; 3) This myth can be and is used to legitimate neo-colonial violence against non-Western others, particularly the Muslim world.

The French Civil Wars, 1562-1598

Author: R. J. Knecht

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN:

Category: History

Page: 356

View: 693

The French Wars of Religion tore the country apart for almost fifty years. They were also part of the wider religious conflict between Catholics and Protestants which raged across Europe during the 16th century. This new study, by a major authority on French history, explores the impact of these wars and sets them in their full European context.

France, 1500-1715

Author: Alastair Armstrong

Publisher: Heinemann

ISBN:

Category: France

Page: 235

View: 569

Heinemann Advanced History offers a differentiation strategy, with books covering AS and A2. Exam preparation includes practice questions, advice on what makes a good answer and help for students on interpreting questions and planning essays.

The French Wars of Religion 1559-1598

Author: R. J. Knecht

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN:

Category: History

Page: 208

View: 582

In the second half of the sixteenth century, France was racked by religious civil wars and peace was only restored when Henry of Navarre finally converted to Catholicism, deciding – in his immortal phrase – that 'Paris is worth a mass'. In this lucid introduction to a complex period in French history, Robert Knecht: Explains the evangelical and Lutheran origins of the Huguenot Church in France Challenges simplistic interpretations of the religious conflict as purely a cloak for political rebellion Provides concise analysis of the wars themselves and the ferment of political ideas which they generated Evaluates the extent of France’s recovery under Henry IV This third edition has been updated throughout to take account of the latest scholarship, particularly on the Massacre of St. Bartholomew and the reign of Henry III when the monarchy almost succumbed to the challenge posed by the Catholic League. There is a new colour plate section and the main text is supported by a full glossary of terms, maps and three detailed genealogical tables, as well as a carefully chosen selection of original documents. Each book in the Seminar Studies in History series provides a concise and reliable introduction to complex events and debates. Written by acknowledged experts and supported by extracts from historical Documents, a Chronology, Glossary, Who’s Who of key figures and Guide to Further Reading, Seminar Studies in History are the essential guides to understanding a topic.

Europe and England in the Sixteenth Century

Author: T.A. Morris

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN:

Category: History

Page: 376

View: 259

This innovative textbook uniquely combines an integrated survey of European and English history in the sixteenth century. The book is structured in three parts: the Western european Environment, The Rise of the Great Monarchies and the Crisis of the Great Monarchies. It covers political, social, religious and economic history from the late Renaissance to Mary Stuart and Philip II. It recognises the amount of common belief and interest between the British Isles and Western Europe in the century of the Reformation and Counter-Reformation and indicates how events on one side of the Channel influenced those on the other side. Key Features: * colourful and informative biographical sketches of major figures * clearly structured genealogical charts, chronologies and full glossaries * surveys of changing historiograhical debates, including contemporary issues * documentary exercises related to examination questions * lavish illustrations including maps, tables, photographs and line drawings Drawing on many years of classroom experience, Terry Morris presents in a highly readable and concise format the essential elements of narrative and debate while also indicating routes to follow for deeper and more advanced study. The book will be essential reading for students of early modern history.

Best Books