Search Results: alabama-s-prehistoric-indians-and-artifacts

ALABAMAS PREHISTORIC INDIANS &

Author: David Johnson

Publisher: Borgo Design

ISBN: 9780996878364

Category: History

Page: 472

View: 2524

An introduction to archaeology in Alabama covering all aspects in one well organized and easily accessible volume. Alabama's Prehistoric Indians and Artifacts is the one reference anyone with an interest in Alabama archaeology should have.

Prehistoric Indians of the Southeast

Archaeology of Alabama and the Middle South

Author: John A. Walthall

Publisher: University of Alabama Press

ISBN: 9780817305529

Category: Social Science

Page: 313

View: 3152

This book deals with the prehistory of the region encompassed by the present state of Alabama and spans a period of some 11,000 years—from 9000 B.C. and the earliest documented appearance of human beings in the area to A.D. 1750, when the early European settlements were well established. Only within the last five decades have remains of these prehistoric peoples been scientifically investigated. This volume is the product of intensive archaeological investigations in Alabama by scores of amateur and professional researchers. It represents no end product but rather is an initial step in our ongoing study of Alabama's prehistoric past. The extent of current industrial development and highway construction within Alabama and the damming of more and more rivers and streams underscore the necessity that an unprecedented effort be made to preserve the traces of prehistoric human beings that are destroyed every day by our own progress.

Arrowheads and Spear Points in the Prehistoric Southeast

A Guide to Understanding Cultural Artifacts

Author: Linda Crawford Culberson

Publisher: Univ. Press of Mississippi

ISBN: 9781604734850

Category: Social Science

Page: 117

View: 3760

The Native American tribes of what is now the southeastern United States left intriguing relics of their ancient cultural life. Arrowheads, spear points, stone tools, and other artifacts are found in newly plowed fields, on hillsides after a fresh rain, or in washed-out creek beds. These are tangible clues to the anthropology of the Paleo-Indians, and the highly developed Mississippian peoples. This indispensable guide to identifying and understanding such finds is for conscientious amateur archeologists who make their discoveries in surface terrain. Many are eager to understand the culture that produced the artifact, what kind of people created it, how it was made, how old it is, and what its purpose was. Here is a handbook that seeks identification through the clues of cultural history. In discussing materials used, the process of manufacture, and the relationship between the artifacts and the environments, it reveals ancient discoveries to be not merely interesting trinkets but by-products from the once vital societies in areas that are now Alabama, Arkansas, Georgia, Kentucky, Louisiana, Mississippi, the Carolinas, as well as in southeastern Texas, southern Missouri, southern Illinois, and southern Indiana. The text is documented by more than a hundred drawings in the actual size of the artifacts, as well as by a glossary of archeological terms and a helpful list of state and regional archeological societies.

The Archaeology and History of the Native Georgia Tribes

Author: Max E. White

Publisher: N.A

ISBN: 9780813025766

Category: History

Page: 149

View: 3813

The story of Georgia’s Indians from elephant hunts to the European invasion. Spanning 12,000 years, this scientifically accurate and very readable book guides readers through the prehistoric and historic archaeological evidence left by Georgia’s native peoples. It is the only comprehensive, up-to-date, and text-based overview of its kind in print. Drawing on an extensive body of archaeological and historical data, White traces Native American cultural development and accomplishment over the millennia preceding the establishment of Georgia as a colony and state. Each chapter opens with a vivid fictional vignette transporting the reader to a past culture and setting the scene for the narrative that follows. From hunting giant buffalo and elephants to attempts in the 1700s and 1800s to maintain tribal integrity in the face of European and Euro-American violence and threats, White takes the reader on an archaeologically based tour of the land that today is Georgia. Evidence from selected archaeological sites and projects is woven into the narrative, and insets supplement the main text to highlight informative passages from archaeological reports and historical documents. A generous number of photographs, maps, and illustrations aid the reader in identifying artifacts and testify to the artistic abilities of these indigenous peoples of Georgia.

Sun Circles and Human Hands

The Southeastern Indians Art and Industries

Author: Emma Lila Fundaburk,Mary Douglass Fundaburk Foreman

Publisher: University of Alabama Press

ISBN: 0817310770

Category: History

Page: 232

View: 1370

From utilitarian arrowheads to beautiful stone effigy pipes to ornately-carved shell disks, the photographs and drawings in Sun Circles and Human Hands present the archaeological record of the art and native crafts of the prehistoric southeastern Indians, painstakingly compiled in the 1950s by two sisters who traveled the eastern United States interviewing archaeologists and collectors and visiting the major repositories. Although research over the last 50 years has disproven many of the early theories reported in the text—which were not the editors' theories but those of the archaeologists of the day—the excellent illustrations of objects no longer available for examination have more than validated the lasting worth of this popular book.

Catawba Valley Mississippian

Ceramics, Chronology, and Catawba Indians

Author: David G. Moore

Publisher: University of Alabama Press

ISBN: 0817311637

Category: History

Page: 359

View: 4587

Publisher Fact Sheet An excellent example of ethnohistory and archaeology combining to reveal new analyses, this well-written book uncovers the origins of the Catawba Indians of North Carolina.

Indian-artifact Magazine

Author: N.A

Publisher: N.A

ISBN: N.A

Category: Indians of North America

Page: N.A

View: 3664

The Texas Indians

Author: David La Vere

Publisher: Texas A&M University Press

ISBN: 9781585443017

Category: History

Page: 293

View: 6151

During an excavation in the 1950s, the bones of a prehistoric woman were discovered in Midland County, Texas. Archaeologists dubbed the woman “Midland Minnie.” Some believed her age to be between 20,000 and 37,000 years, making her remains the oldest ever found in the Western Hemisphere. While the accuracy of this date remains disputed, the find, along with countless others, demonstrates the wealth of human history that is buried beneath Texas soil. By the time the Europeans arrived in Texas in 1528, Native Texans included the mound-building Caddos of East Texas; Karankawas and Atakapas who fished the Texas coast; town-dwelling Jumanos along the Rio Grande; hunting-gathering Coahuiltecans in South Texas; and corn-growing Wichitas in the Panhandle. All of these native peoples had developed structures, traditions, governments, religions, and economies enabling them to take advantage of the land’s many resources. The arrival of Europeans brought horses, metal tools and weapons, new diseases and new ideas, all of which began to reshape the lives of Texas Indians. Over time, Texas became a home to horse-mounted, buffalo-hunting Apaches, Comanches, and Kiowas and a refuge for Puebloan Tiguas, Alabama-Coushattas, Kickapoos and many others. These groups traded, shared ideas, fought and made peace with one another as well as peoples outside of Texas. This book tells the story of all of these groups, their societies and cultures, and how they changed over the years. Author David La Vere offers a complete chronological and cultural history of Texas Indians from 12,000 years ago to the present day. He presents a unique view of their cultural history before and after European arrival, examining their interactions—both peaceful and violent—with Europeans, Mexicans, Texans, and Americans. This book is the first full examination of the history of Texas Indians in over forty years and will appeal to all of those with an interest in Native Americans and the history of Texas.

Archaeology of the Lower Muskogee Creek Indians, 1715-1836

Author: Thomas Foster,Mary Theresa Bonhage-Freund,Lisa D. O'Steen

Publisher: University of Alabama Press

ISBN: 0817353658

Category: Art

Page: 292

View: 5950

The first comprehensive archaeological survey of the Muskogee (Maskókî) Creek Indians.

Choctaw Genesis, 1500-1700

Author: Patricia Galloway

Publisher: U of Nebraska Press

ISBN: 9780803270701

Category: History

Page: 411

View: 6276

Today the Choctaws are remembered as one of the Five Civilized Tribes, removed to Oklahoma in the early nineteenth century; a large band remains in Mississippi, quietly and effectively refusing to be assimilated. The Choctaws are a Muskogean people, in historical times residing in southern Mississippi and Alabama; they were agriculturalists as well as hunters, and a force to be reckoned with in the eighteenth century. Patricia Galloway, armed with evidence from a variety of disciplines, counters the commonly held belief that these same people had long exercised power in the region. She argues that the turmoil set in motion by European exploration led to realignments and regroupings, and ultimately to the formation of a powerful new Indian nation. Through a close examination of the physical evidence and historical sources, the author provides an ethnohistorical account of the proto-Choctaw and Choctaw peoples from the eve of contact with Euro-Americans through the following two centuries. Starting with the basic archaeological evidence and the written records of early Spanish and English visitors, Galloway traces the likely origin of the Choctaw people, their movements and interactions with other native groups in the South, and Choctaw response to these contacts. She thereby creates the first careful and complete history of the tribe in the early modern period. This rich and detailed work will not only provides much new information on the Choctaws but illuminates the entire field of colonial-era southeastern history and will provide a model for ethnographic studies.

Amulets, Effigies, Fetishes, and Charms

Native American Artifacts and Spirit Stones from the Northeast

Author: Edward J. Lenik

Publisher: University of Alabama Press

ISBN: 0817319239

Category: History

Page: 187

View: 8951

Amulets, Effigies, Fetishes, and Charms rounds out Edward J. Lenik's comprehensive and expert study of the rock art of northeastern Native Americans. This volume provides a basis for interpreting the symbolism of more than eighty portable stone artifacts found in the region.

Guide to Wild Foods and Useful Plants

Author: Christopher Nyerges

Publisher: Chicago Review Press

ISBN: 1613747012

Category: Nature

Page: 352

View: 5900

An array of abundant wild foods is available to hikers, campers, foragers, or anyone interested in living closer to the earth. Written by a leading expert on wild foods and a well-known teacher of survival skills, Guide to Wild Foods and Useful Plants is more than a listing of plant types—it teaches how to recognize edible plants and where to find them, their medicinal and nutritional properties, and their growing cycles. This new edition features more than 70 plants found all around the United States along with more than 100 full color photos plus handy leaf, fruit, and seed keys to help readers identify the plants. It also includes fascinating folklore about plants, personal anecdotes about trips and meals, and simple and tasty recipes.

Caciques and Cemi Idols

The Web Spun by Taino Rulers Between Hispaniola and Puerto Rico

Author: José R. Oliver

Publisher: University of Alabama Press

ISBN: 0817355154

Category: History

Page: 306

View: 7372

Caciques and Cemi Idolstakes a close look at the relationship between humans and other (non-human) beings that are imbued with cemí power, specifically within the Taíno inter-island cultural sphere encompassing Puerto Rico and Hispaniola.

Picture Cave

Unraveling the Mysteries of the Mississippian Cosmos

Author: Carol Diaz-Granados,James R. Duncan,F. Kent Reilly, III

Publisher: Linda Schele Series in Maya an

ISBN: N.A

Category: History

Page: 334

View: 5223

A millennia ago, Native Americans entered the dark recesses of a cave in eastern Missouri and painted an astonishing array of human, animal, and supernatural creatures on its walls. Known as Picture Cave, it was a hallowed site for sacred rituals and rites of passage, for explaining the multi-layered cosmos, for vision quests, for communing with spirits in the "other world," and for burying the dead. The number, variety, and complexity of images make Picture Cave one of the most significant prehistoric sites in North America, similar in importance to Cahokia and Chaco Canyon. Indeed, scholars will be able to use it to reconstruct much of the Native American symbolism of the early Western Mississippian world. The Picture Cave Interdisciplinary Project brought together specialists in American Indian art and iconography, two artists, Osage Indian elders, a museum curator, a folklorist, and an internationally renowned cave archaeologist to produce the first complete documentation of the pictographs on the cave walls and the first interpretations of their meanings and significance. This extensively illustrated volume presents the Project's findings, including an introduction to Picture Cave and prehistoric cave art and technical analyses of pigments, radiocarbon dating, spatial order, and archaeological remains. Interpretations of the cave's imagery, from individual motifs to complex panels; the responses of contemporary artists; and interviews with Osage elders (descendants of the people who made the art), describing what Picture Cave means to them today, are also included. A visual glossary of all the images in Picture Cave as well as panoramic views complete this pathfinding volume.

Early Art of the Southeastern Indians

Feathered Serpents & Winged Beings

Author: Susan C. Power

Publisher: University of Georgia Press

ISBN: 9780820325019

Category: Art

Page: 254

View: 5124

Early Art of the Southeastern Indians is a visual journey through time, highlighting some of the most skillfully created art in native North America. The remarkable objects described and pictured here, many in full color, reveal the hands of master artists who developed lapidary and weaving traditions, established centers for production of shell and copper objects, and created the first ceramics in North America. Presenting artifacts originating in the Archaic through the Mississippian periods--from thousands of years ago through A.D. 1600--Susan C. Power introduces us to an extraordinary assortment of ceremonial and functional objects, including pipes, vessels, figurines, and much more. Drawn from every corner of the Southeast--from Louisiana to the Ohio River valley, from Florida to Oklahoma--the pieces chronicle the emergence of new media and the mastery of new techniques as they offer clues to their creators’ widening awareness of their physical and spiritual worlds. The most complex works, writes Power, were linked to male (and sometimes female) leaders. Wearing bold ensembles consisting of symbolic colors, sacred media, and richly complex designs, the leaders controlled large ceremonial centers that were noteworthy in regional art history, such as Etowah, Georgia; Spiro, Oklahoma; Cahokia, Illinois; and Moundville, Alabama. Many objects were used locally; others circulated to distant locales. Power comments on the widening of artists’ subjects, starting with animals and insects, moving to humans, then culminating in supernatural combinations of both, and she discusses how a piece’s artistic “language” could function as a visual shorthand in local style and expression, yet embody an iconography of regional proportions. The remarkable achievements of these southeastern artists delight the senses and engage the mind while giving a brief glimpse into the rich, symbolic world of feathered serpents and winged beings.

Copper artifacts in late eastern Woodlands prehistory

Author: Claire Garber Goodman,Anne-Marie E. Cantwell

Publisher: Center for Amer Archeology Pr

ISBN: 9780942118162

Category: Crafts & Hobbies

Page: 104

View: 6911

Archaeology at Shiloh Indian Mounds, 1899-1999

Author: Paul D. Welch

Publisher: University of Alabama Press

ISBN: 0817352538

Category: History

Page: 294

View: 4689

100 years of archaeological excavations at an important American landmark. The Shiloh Indian Mounds archaeological site, a National Historic Landmark, is a late prehistoric community within the boundaries of the Shiloh National Military Park on the banks of the Tennessee River, where one of the bloodiest battles of the Civil War was fought in April 1862. Dating between AD 1000 and 1450, the archaeological site includes at least eight mounds and more than 100 houses. It is unique in that the land has never been plowed, so visitors can walk around the area and find the collapsed remains of 800-year-old houses and the 900-meter-long palisade with bastions that protected the village in prehistoric times. Although its location within a National Park boundary has protected the area from the recent ravages of man, river bank erosion began to undermine the site in the 1970s. In the mid-1990s, Paul Welch began a four-year investigation culminating in a comprehensive report to the National Park Service on the Shiloh Indian Mounds. These published findings confirm that the Shiloh site was one of at least fourteen Mississippian mound sites located within a 50 km area and that Shiloh was abandoned in approximately AD 1450. It also establishes other parameters for the Shiloh archaeological phase. This current volume is intended to make information about the first 100 years of excavations at the Shiloh site available to the archaeological community. Paul D. Welch is an Associate Professor of Anthropology at Southern Illionois University, Carbondale, and is the authro of Moundville's Economy.

The World and Its Peoples: U.S.A.

Author: N.A

Publisher: N.A

ISBN: N.A

Category: United States

Page: 642

View: 1550

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