Search Results: anthropological-perspectives-on-kinship

Anthropological Perspectives On Kinship

Author: Ladislav Holy

Publisher: University of Alberta

ISBN: 9780745309170

Category: Social Science

Page: 198

View: 4274

Explores new developments in kinship studies in anthropology -- including the impact of new reproductive technologies and changing conceptualisations of personhood and gender.

Anthropological Perspectives on Care

Work, Kinship, and the Life-Course

Author: Erdmute Alber,Heike Drotbohm

Publisher: Springer

ISBN: 1137513446

Category: Social Science

Page: 237

View: 9295

In the course of last two decades, the notion of care has become prominent in the social and cultural sciences. As a result of this proliferation of care in several disciplinary fields, we are observing not only the expansion of its conceptual meaning, but also an increasing imprecision in its usage. A growing amount of literature focuses on the intersection between work, gender, ethnicity, affect, and mobility regimes. In view of this growing field of literature, Anthropological Perspectives on Care looks at the notion of care from an anthropological perspective. Complementing earlier approaches, Alber and Drotbohm argue that an interpretation of care in relation to three different concepts, namely work, kinship and the life-course, will facilitate empirical and conceptual distinctions between the different activities that are labeled as care.

Kinship, Contract, Community, and State

Anthropological Perspectives on China

Author: Myron L. Cohen

Publisher: Stanford University Press

ISBN: 9780804750677

Category: History

Page: 359

View: 931

This is an anthropological exploration of the roots of China's modernity in the country's own tradition, as seen especially in economic and kinship patterns.

Chinese Kinship

Contemporary Anthropological Perspectives

Author: Susanne Brandtstädter,Gonçalo D Santos

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 1134105886

Category: Social Science

Page: 256

View: 7629

The essays in this volume present contemporary anthropological perspectives on Chinese kinship, its historical complexity and its modern metamorphoses. The collection draws particular attention to the reverberations of larger socio-cultural and politico-economic processes in the formation of sociality, intimate relations, family histories, reproductive strategies and gender relations – and vice-versa. Drawing on a wealth of ethnographic material from the late imperial period and from contemporary Taiwan and the People’s Republic of China, from northern and southern regions as well as from rural and urban settings, the volume provides unique insights into the historical and spatial diversities of the Chinese kinship experience. This emphasis on diversity challenges the classic ‘lineage paradigm’ of Chinese kinship and establishes a dialogue with contemporary anthropological debates about human kinship reflecting on the emergence of radically new family formations in the Euro-American context. Chinese Kinship will be of interest to anthropologists and sinologists, as to historians and social scientists in general.

Kinship and Marriage

An Anthropological Perspective

Author: Robin Fox

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

ISBN: 9780521278232

Category: Social Science

Page: 273

View: 6467

New paperback edition of Robin Fox's study of systems of kinship and alliance, which has become an established classic of social science literature.

Friendship, Descent and Alliance in Africa

Anthropological Perspectives

Author: Martine Guichard,Tilo Grätz,Youssouf Diallo

Publisher: Berghahn Books

ISBN: 1782382879

Category: Social Science

Page: 220

View: 479

Friendship, descent and alliance are basic forms of relatedness that have received unequal attention in social anthropology. Offering new insights into the ways in which friendship is conceptualized and realized in various sub-Saharan African settings, the contributions to this volume depart from the recent tendency to study friendship in isolation from kinship. In drawing attention to the complexity of the interactions between these two kinds of social relationships, the book suggests that analyses of friendship in Western societies would also benefit from research that explores more systematically friendship in conjunction with kinship.

Kinship and the Social Order

The Legacy of Lewis Henry Morgan

Author: Meyer Fortes

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 1351510037

Category: Social Science

Page: 362

View: 7656

One of the world's most eminent social anthropologists draws upon his many years of study and research in the field of kinship and social organization to review the development of anthropological theory and method from Lewis Henry Morgan (1818-1881) to anthropologists of the 1960s. It is the central argument of this book that the structuralist theory and method developed by British and American anthropologists in the study of kinship and social organization is the direct descendant of Morgan's researches. The volume starts with a re-examination of Morgan's work. Professor Fortes demonstrates how a tradition of misinterpretation has disguised the true import of Morgan's discoveries. He follows with a detailed analysis of the work of Rivers and Radcliffe-Brown and the generation of anthropologists inspired by them. The author states his own point of view as it has developed in the framework of modern structuralist theory, with ethnographic examples examined in depth. He shows that the social relations and institutions conventionally grouped under the rubric of kinship and social organization belong simultaneously to two complementary domains of social structure, the familial and the political. Meyer Fortes' contribution to the field of anthropology can best be understood in the context of balance of forces between these domains of the personal and public. In the latter part of the book, he gives detailed attention to the principal conceptual issues that have confronted research and theory in the study of kinship and social organizations since Morgan's time. He shows that kinship institutions are autonomous, not mere by-products of economic requirements, and demonstrates the moral base of kinship in the rule of amity.

The Ways of Friendship

Anthropological Perspectives

Author: Amit Desai,Evan Killick

Publisher: Berghahn Books

ISBN: 1845458508

Category: Social Science

Page: 228

View: 8589

Friendship is an essential part of human experience, involving ideas of love and morality as well as material and pragmatic concerns. Making and having friends is a central aspect of everyday life in all human societies. Yet friendship is often considered of secondary significance in comparison to domains such as kinship, economics and politics. How important are friends in different cultural contexts? What would a study of society viewed through the lens of friendship look like? Does friendship affect the shape of society as much as society moulds friendship? Drawing on long-term ethnographic fieldwork in Asia, the Middle East, Africa, Latin America and Europe, this volume offers answers to these questions and examines the ideology and practice of friendship as it is embedded in wider social contexts and transformations.

Nighttime Breastfeeding

An American Cultural Dilemma

Author: Cecília Tomori

Publisher: Berghahn Books

ISBN: 1782384367

Category: Health & Fitness

Page: 316

View: 6388

Nighttime for many new parents in the United States is fraught with the intense challenges of learning to breastfeed and helping their babies sleep so they can get rest themselves. Through careful ethnographic study of the dilemmas raised by nighttime breastfeeding, and their examination in the context of anthropological, historical, and feminist studies, this volume unravels the cultural tensions that underlie these difficulties. As parents negotiate these dilemmas, they not only confront conflicting medical guidelines about breastfeeding and solitary infant sleep, but also larger questions about cultural and moral expectations for children and parents, and their relationship with one another.

Webs of Power

Women, Kin, and Community in a Sumatran Village

Author: Evelyn Blackwood

Publisher: Rowman & Littlefield

ISBN: 9780847699117

Category: Social Science

Page: 219

View: 2623

Webs of Power offers a fresh perspective on women in Southeast Asia. Although the book focuses on one village, it provides vital insights into the gendered processes of post-coloniality. By exploring the contestations and accommodations being made in rural villages by both men and women, Webs of Power reveals the processes at the heart of globalization as well as the complexities of power that circulate between women and men in a rural peasant society.

The Social Life of Trees

Anthropological Perspectives on Tree Symbolism

Author: Laura Rival

Publisher: Berg Publishers

ISBN: N.A

Category: Nature

Page: 315

View: 4022

Offers a host of answers from an anthropological perspective on the symbolic meanings of trees. Shows the astonishing ways we use species, coconuts, bananas, cedars. Symbols such as the American sequoia and U.K. oak tree.

An Introduction to Childhood

Anthropological Perspectives on Children's Lives

Author: Heather Montgomery

Publisher: John Wiley & Sons

ISBN: 1444358251

Category: Social Science

Page: 296

View: 2491

In An Introduction to Childhood, Heather Montgomery examines the role children have played within anthropology, how they have been studied by anthropologists and how they have been portrayed and analyzed in ethnographic monographs over the last one hundred and fifty years. Offers a comprehensive overview of childhood from an anthropological perspective Draws upon a wide range of examples and evidence from different geographical areas and belief systems Synthesizes existing literature on the anthropology of childhood, while providing a fresh perspective Engages students with illustrative ethnographies to illuminate key topics and themes

Kinship And Beyond

The Genealogical Model Reconsidered

Author: Sandra Bamford,James Leach

Publisher: Berghahn Books

ISBN: 0857456407

Category: Social Science

Page: 300

View: 1831

The genealogical model has a long-standing history in Western thought. The contributors to this volume consider the ways in which assumptions about the genealogical model—in particular, ideas concerning sequence, essence, and transmission—structure other modes of practice and knowledge-making in domains well beyond what is normally labeled “kinship.” The detailed ethnographic work and analysis included in this text explores how these assumptions have been built into our understandings of race, personhood, ethnicity, property relations, and the relationship between human beings and non-human species. The authors explore the influences of the genealogical model of kinship in wider social theory and examine anthropology’s ability to provide a unique framework capable of bridging the “social” and “natural” sciences. In doing so, this volume brings fresh new perspectives to bear on contemporary theories concerning biotechnology and its effect upon social life.

After Kinship

Author: Janet Carsten

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

ISBN: 9780521665704

Category: Fiction

Page: 216

View: 5863

What is the impact on anthropology of recent studies of reproductive technologies, gender, and the social construction of science in the West? What is the significance of public anxiety about the family to anthropology's analytic approach? Janet Carsten presents an original view of the past, present, and future of kinship in anthropology which will be of interest to anthropologists as well as to other social scientists.

Reproducing the Future

Essays on Anthropology, Kinship and the New Reproductive Technologies

Author: Marilyn Strathern

Publisher: Manchester University Press

ISBN: 9780719036743

Category: Anthropology

Page: 200

View: 1646

These essays, written at the time when the Bill for Human Fertilization and Embryology Act (1990) was going through Parliament, touch on the British debate (on in vitro fertilization, gamete donation and maternal surrogacy) from an anthropological perspective. The implications of the medical developments that lay behind the Act are world-wide and these new procreative possibilities formulate new possibilities for thinking about kinship. The essays are informed by recent re-thinking of models of kinship in Melanesia.

Obesity

Cultural and Biocultural Perspectives

Author: Alexandra A. Brewis

Publisher: Rutgers University Press

ISBN: 9780813548906

Category: Medical

Page: 209

View: 4438

In a world now filled with more people who are overweight than underweight, public health and medical perspectives paint obesity as a catastrophic epidemic that threatens to overwhelm health systems and undermine life expectancies globally. In many societies, being obese also creates profound personal suffering because it is so culturally stigmatized. Yet despite loud messages about the health and social costs of being obese, weight gain is a seemingly universal aspect of the modern human condition. Grounded in a holistic anthropological approach and using a range of ethnographic and ecological case studies, Obesity shows that the human tendency to become and stay fat makes perfect sense in terms of evolved human inclinations and the physical and social realities of modern life. Drawing on her own fieldwork in the rural United States, Mexico, and the Pacific Islands over the last two decades, Alexandra A. Brewis addresses such critical questions as why obesity is defined as a problem and why some groups are so much more at risk than others. She suggests innovative ways that anthropology and other social sciences can use community-based research to address the serious public health and social justice concerns provoked by the global spread of obesity.

Relative Values

Reconfiguring Kinship Studies

Author: Sarah Franklin,Susan McKinnon

Publisher: Duke University Press

ISBN: 0822383225

Category: Social Science

Page: 530

View: 7242

The essays in Relative Values draw on new work in anthropology, science studies, gender theory, critical race studies, and postmodernism to offer a radical revisioning of kinship and kinship theory. Through a combination of vivid case studies and trenchant theoretical essays, the contributors—a group of internationally recognized scholars—examine both the history of kinship theory and its future, at once raising questions that have long occupied a central place within the discipline of anthropology and moving beyond them. Ideas about kinship are vital not only to understanding but also to forming many of the practices and innovations of contemporary society. How do the cultural logics of contemporary biopolitics, commodification, and globalization intersect with kinship practices and theories? In what ways do kinship analogies inform scientific and clinical practices; and what happens to kinship when it is created in such unfamiliar sites as biogenetic labs, new reproductive technology clinics, and the computers of artificial life scientists? How does kinship constitute—and get constituted by—the relations of power that draw lines of hierarchy and equality, exclusion and inclusion, ambivalence and violence? The contributors assess the implications for kinship of such phenomena as blood transfusions, adoption across national borders, genetic support groups, photography, and the new reproductive technologies while ranging from rural China to mid-century Africa to contemporary Norway and the United States. Addressing these and other timely issues, Relative Values injects new life into one of anthropology's most important disciplinary traditions. Posing these and other timely questions, Relative Values injects an important interdisciplinary curiosity into one of anthropology’s most important disciplinary traditions. Contributors. Mary Bouquet, Janet Carsten, Charis Thompson Cussins, Carol Delaney, Gillian Feeley-Harnik, Sarah Franklin, Deborah Heath, Stefan Helmreich, Signe Howell, Jonathan Marks, Susan McKinnon, Michael G. Peletz, Rayna Rapp, Martine Segalen, Pauline Turner Strong, Melbourne Tapper, Karen-Sue Taussig, Kath Weston, Yunxiang Yan

Kinship and Gender

An Introduction

Author: Linda Stone

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 042997471X

Category: Social Science

Page: 352

View: 6684

Does kinship still matter in today's globalized, increasingly mobile world? Do family structures continue to influence the varied roles that men and women play in different cultures? Answering with a resounding ?yes!?, Linda Stone offers a lively introduction to and working knowledge of kinship. She firmly links these concepts to cross-cultural gender studies, illuminating the malleable nature of gender roles around the world and over time.Written to engage students, each chapter provides key terms and useful generalizations gleaned through cross-cultural research on the interplay of kinship and gender in both traditional societies and contemporary communities. Detailed case studies help students understand how such generalizations are experienced ?in real life.? Stone also considers the ramifications of current social problems and recent developments in reproductive technology as she demonstrates the relevance of kinship and gender to students' lives.The fully-revised fifth edition features discussion of cross-cultural examples complimented by expanded coverage of kinship and gender dynamics within the United States. Stone considers current evolutionary research on kinship and gender, and offers new case studies addressing international adoptions and polygynous marriage. An entirely new chapter explores the globalization of kinship in the 21st century. The result is a broad and captivating exploration of anthropological approaches to family and gender.

Race, nature and culture

an anthropological perspective

Author: Peter Wade

Publisher: Pluto Pr

ISBN: N.A

Category: Social Science

Page: 150

View: 1128

Taking the study of race beyond Western notions of the individual, Wade argues for an anthropological understanding of the connections between race, sex and gender.

Kinship and Family

An Anthropological Reader

Author: David Parkin,Linda Stone

Publisher: Wiley-Blackwell

ISBN: 9780631229995

Category: Social Science

Page: 496

View: 8105

The most comprehensive reader on kinship available, Kinship and Family: An Anthropological Reader is a representative collection tracing the history of the anthropological study of kinship from the early 1900s to the present day. Brings together for the first time both classic works from Evans-Pritchard, Lévi-Strauss, Leach, and Schneider, as well as articles on such electrifying contemporary debates as surrogate motherhood, and gay and lesbian kinship. Draws on the editors’ complementary areas of expertise to offer readers a single-volume survey of the most important and critical work on kinship. Includes extensive discussion and analysis of the selections that contextualizes them within theoretical debates.

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