Search Results: black-farmers-in-america

Black Farmers in America

Author: John Francis Ficara

Publisher: University Press of Kentucky

ISBN: 0813128684

Category: Photography

Page: N.A

View: 7872

Black Farmers in America

Author: John Francis Ficara,Juan Williams

Publisher: N.A

ISBN: 9780813123998

Category: Photography

Page: 126

View: 365

A photojournalistic essay documenting the struggle of black farmers in the U.S. at the end of the 20th century. Accompanying text provides a historical context for the photographs.

The Color of Food

Stories of Race, Resilience and Farming

Author: Natasha Bowens

Publisher: New Society Publishers

ISBN: 1550925857

Category: Social Science

Page: 240

View: 771

Reclaiming the roots of farmers of color

Dispossession

Discrimination against African American Farmers in the Age of Civil Rights

Author: Pete Daniel

Publisher: UNC Press Books

ISBN: 1469602024

Category: Social Science

Page: 352

View: 5970

Between 1940 and 1974, the number of African American farmers fell from 681,790 to just 45,594--a drop of 93 percent. In his hard-hitting book, historian Pete Daniel analyzes this decline and chronicles black farmers' fierce struggles to remain on the land in the face of discrimination by bureaucrats in the U.S. Department of Agriculture. He exposes the shameful fact that at the very moment civil rights laws promised to end discrimination, hundreds of thousands of black farmers lost their hold on the land as they were denied loans, information, and access to the programs essential to survival in a capital-intensive farm structure. More than a matter of neglect of these farmers and their rights, this "passive nullification" consisted of a blizzard of bureaucratic obfuscation, blatant acts of discrimination and cronyism, violence, and intimidation. Dispossession recovers a lost chapter of the black experience in the American South, presenting a counternarrative to the conventional story of the progress achieved by the civil rights movement.

Homecoming

The Story of African-American Farmers

Author: Charlene Gilbert,Quinn Eli

Publisher: Beacon Press

ISBN: 9780807009635

Category: Social Science

Page: 193

View: 2820

A photographic essay which offers a striking and moving tribute to African-American farmers. This is the companion book to Gilbert's PBS documentary, HOMECOMING. Homecoming traces the history of black farmers from Reconstruction to the present, as they struggle to survive today. Homecoming pays tribute not only to the devastating losses they have suffered throughout the century, but also to the legacy of hope that endures in the story of African-Americans working the land. "Revisiting the unbearable hardships encountered by my great-grandparents, grandparents, and parents as they sought to survive the inhuman sharecropping system of the post-Civil War South—a system in many ways more brutal than slavery—my heart breaks again. But reading Homecoming's account of our ancestors' determined humility, obdurate courage, and fierce pride in and love of the land, my heart is healed. I see why there is such a thing as ancestor worship. I could not love my sharecropping ancestors more if I had created them myself. That black Southerners still love nature and revere the earth is the legacy of a people whose innate elegance and dignity was always expressed in essentials." —Alice Walker "An extraordinary gift. . . . A moving, lyrical, and important history: a tale of land, labor, love, and loss." —Farah Jasmine Griffin "Moving, highly informative, and valuable." —Barbara Neely, author of Blanche Cleans Up

Lentil Underground

Renegade Farmers and the Future of Food in America

Author: Liz Carlisle

Publisher: Avery

ISBN: 1592409563

Category: Agricultural development projects

Page: 298

View: 3583

For the past four decades, third-generation Montana farmer David Oien has been seeding a revolution against corporate agribusiness in the belly of the beast, the American grain belt. They have replaced their wheat and barley with a seemingly odd new crop, the lentil, a legume that has been part of the human diet since Neolithic times, but, until Oien's work, was never grown on Montana farms. In this eye-opening narrative, journalist and food scientist Liz Carlisle chronicles Oien's unlikely emergence as the leader of this agricultural upheaval.

Foodopoly

The Battle Over the Future of Food and Farming in America

Author: Wenonah Hauter

Publisher: The New Press

ISBN: 159558790X

Category: Business & Economics

Page: 355

View: 8369

Argues that lobbyists and the consolidation and corporate control of food production is to blame for the unhealthy and unfair agricultural policies of the United States.

American Farmer

The Heart of Our Country

Author: Katrina Fried,Paul Mobley

Publisher: Welcome Books

ISBN: 9781599621296

Category: Photography

Page: 275

View: 7536

A compelling collection of more than 150 full-color and black-and-white photographs offers profiles of farming families across the United States, capturing the heart and soul of the nation's farm communities and their rural culture in every region of America. 25,000 first printing.

Freedom Farmers

Agricultural Resistance and the Black Freedom Movement

Author: Monica M. White

Publisher: Justice, Power, and Politics

ISBN: 9781469643694

Category: Nature

Page: 232

View: 8634

In May 1967, internationally renowned activist Fannie Lou Hamer purchased forty acres of land in the Mississippi Delta, launching the Freedom Farms Cooperative (FFC). A community-based rural and economic development project, FFC would grow to over 600 acres, offering a means for local sharecroppers, tenant farmers, and domestic workers to pursue community wellness, self-reliance, and political resistance. Life on the cooperative farm presented an alternative to the second wave of northern migration by African Americans--an opportunity to stay in the South, live off the land, and create a healthy community based upon building an alternative food system as a cooperative and collective effort. Freedom Farmers expands the historical narrative of the black freedom struggle to embrace the work, roles, and contributions of southern black farmers and the organizations they formed. Whereas existing scholarship generally views agriculture as a site of oppression and exploitation of black people, this book reveals agriculture as a site of resistance and provides a historical foundation that adds meaning and context to current conversations around the resurgence of food justice/sovereignty movements in urban spaces like Detroit, Chicago, Milwaukee, New York City, and New Orleans.

Global Agriculture and the American Farmer

Opportunities for U.S. Leadership

Author: Kimberly Ann Elliott

Publisher: Brookings Institution Press

ISBN: 1944691006

Category: Social Science

Page: 184

View: 2362

The United States is one of the world’s largest producers and exporters of a range of agricultural commodities, and the largest provider of foreign assistance, so U.S. policies have big effects on global food security and other global public goods linked to agriculture. On the positive side of the ledger, President Obama created the Feed the Future aid initiative to promote agricultural development in poorer countries as a tool to achieve the global goals of ending hunger and extreme poverty, which are mostly rural. But that generosity is undercut by U.S. support for farmers that distorts global markets and ignores negative spillovers for the rest of the world. In this book, Elliott focuses on three policy areas that are particularly damaging for developing countries: traditional agricultural subsidy and trade policies that support the incomes of American farmers at the expense of farmers elsewhere; the biofuels mandate, which in its current form increases market volatility while doing little if anything to mitigate climate change; and weak regulation of antibiotic use in livestock, which contributes to the global spread of drug-resistant super bugs. While noting that broad reforms are needed to fix these problems, Elliott also identifies practical steps that U.S. policymakers could take in the relatively short run to improve farm policies—for American taxpayers and consumers as well as for the poor and vulnerable in developing countries.

This Blessed Earth: A Year in the Life of an American Family Farm

Author: Ted Genoways

Publisher: W. W. Norton & Company

ISBN: 0393292584

Category: Technology & Engineering

Page: 288

View: 4161

Is there still a place for the farm in today’s America? The family farm lies at the heart of our national identity, yet its future is in peril. Rick Hammond grew up on a small ranch, and for forty years he has raised cattle and crops on his wife’s fifth-generation homestead in York County, Nebraska, in hopes of passing it on to their four children. But as the handoff nears, their small family farm—and their entire way of life—are under siege. Rising corporate ownership of land and livestock is forcing small farmers to get bigger and bigger, assuming more debt and more risk. At the same time, after nearly a decade of record-high corn and soybean prices, the bottom has dropped out of the markets, making it ever harder for small farmers to shoulder their loans. All the while, the Hammonds are confronted by encroaching pipelines, groundwater depletion, climate change, and shifting trade policies. Far from an isolated refuge beyond the reach of global events, the family farm is increasingly at the crossroads of emerging technologies and international detente. Following the Hammonds from harvest to harvest, Ted Genoways explores this rapidly changing landscape of small, traditional farming operations, mapping as it unfolds day to day. This Blessed Earth is both a concise exploration of the history of the American small farm and a vivid, nuanced portrait of one family’s fight to preserve their legacy and the life they love.

Discovering Black America

From the Age of Exploration to the Twenty-First Century

Author: Linda Tarrant-Reid

Publisher: Abrams

ISBN: 168335429X

Category: Juvenile Nonfiction

Page: 244

View: 3635

DIVDiscovering Black America offers readers an unprecedented account of more than 400 years of African American history set against a background of American and global events. The book begins with a black sailor aboard the Niña with Christopher Columbus and continues through the colonial period, slavery, the Civil War, Jim Crow, and civil rights to our current president in the White House. Including first-person narratives from diaries and journals, interviews, and archival images, Discovering Black America will give readers an intimate understanding of this extensive history. The book includes an index and bibliography. UPraise for Discovering Black America/u STARRED REVIEWS "This handsome, engaging study of African-American history brings to light many intriguing and tragically underreported stories...From attractive page design to an afterword that encourages readers to search for their own history, there has been much attention to detail in this handsome volume." —Kirkus Reviews, starred review "Reproductions of historical documents, photographs, and artwork provide a sense of immediacy to this immersive tapestry, which reaches well beyond the milestones typically outlined in history books." —Publishers Weekly, starred review "This attractive volume is an epic work...Absolutely gorgeous in design, with a harmonious marriage of text and colorful archival images, this is the kind of book that invites browsing, and its extensive reach will make this a go-to title for report writers." —School Library Journal "This handsome historical overview begins with the first African explorers and seamen arriving in the New World in the fifteenth century, and it ends with the presidential election of Barack Obama..The extensive back matter includes meticulous footnotes and a bibliography of recommended books and websites for all those who will be moved to find out more. An excellent title for classroom support." —Booklist "The author provides a detailed overview that is thoroughly researched and documented, making this an outstanding resource for students. The primary source documents, photographs, and archival maps that complement this compelling account will engage readers...This book will undoubtedly prove to be useful for research and browsing alike.†? —Library Media Connection, highly recommended UAward/u Notable Social Studies Trade Books for Young People 2013/div

Fields of Plenty

A Farmer's Journey in Search of Real Food and the People Who Grow It

Author: Michael Ableman

Publisher: Chronicle Books

ISBN: 9780811842235

Category: Cooking

Page: 255

View: 1307

In the face of supersizing and a fast-food nation, a growing community of organic farmers and food artisans are producing sustainable nourishment that is respectful to the land and rich in heritage, flavor, and passion. In Fields of Plenty, respected farmer, teacher, and ecology advocate Michael Ableman seeks out these innovative and committed farmers to reveal how the fruits of those who till the soil go beyond taste. From Knolls farm in California, famous for succulent figs tree-ripened to perfection, to an urban farm in Chicago that sustains an entire community, his odyssey takes him to farmers who are trying to answer questions of sustenance philosophically and, most importantly, in practice. Illustrated with evocative color photographs of the land and the people who work it, and accompanied by a bountiful selection of recipes, this beautifully written memoir reveals the power of food as a personal and cultural force.

Farming While Black

Soul Fire Farm's Practical Guide to Liberation on the Land

Author: Leah Penniman

Publisher: Chelsea Green Publishing

ISBN: 1603587616

Category: African American farmers

Page: 368

View: 3927

In 1920, 14 percent of all land-owning US farmers were black. Today less than 2 percent of farms are controlled by black people--a loss of over 14 million acres and the result of discrimination and dispossession. While farm management is among the whitest of professions, farm labor is predominantly brown and exploited, and people of color disproportionately live in "food apartheid" neighborhoods and suffer from diet-related illness. The system is built on stolen land and stolen labor and needs a redesign. Farming While Black is the first comprehensive "how to" guide for aspiring African-heritage growers to reclaim their dignity as agriculturists and for all farmers to understand the distinct, technical contributions of African-heritage people to sustainable agriculture. At Soul Fire Farm, author Leah Penniman co-created the Black and Latinx Farmers Immersion (BLFI) program as a container for new farmers to share growing skills in a culturally relevant and supportive environment led by people of color. Farming While Black organizes and expands upon the curriculum of the BLFI to provide readers with a concise guide to all aspects of small-scale farming, from business planning to preserving the harvest. Throughout the chapters Penniman uplifts the wisdom of the African diasporic farmers and activists whose work informs the techniques described--from whole farm planning, soil fertility, seed selection, and agroecology, to using whole foods in culturally appropriate recipes, sharing stories of ancestors, and tools for healing from the trauma associated with slavery and economic exploitation on the land. Woven throughout the book is the story of Soul Fire Farm, a national leader in the food justice movement. The technical information is designed for farmers and gardeners with beginning to intermediate experience. For those with more experience, the book provides a fresh lens on practices that may have been taken for granted as ahistorical or strictly European. Black ancestors and contemporaries have always been leaders--and continue to lead--in the sustainable agriculture and food justice movements. It is time for all of us to listen.

Poison Spring

The Secret History of Pollution and the EPA

Author: E.G. Vallianatos,McKay Jenkins

Publisher: Bloomsbury Publishing USA

ISBN: 1608199258

Category: Nature

Page: 304

View: 6498

Imagine walking into a restaurant and finding chlorinated hydrocarbon pesticides, or neonicotinoid insecticides listed in the description of your entree. They may not be printed in the menu, but many are in your food. These are a few of the literally millions of pounds of approved synthetic substances dumped into the environment every day, not just in the US but around the world. They seep into our water supply, are carried thousands of miles by wind and rain from the site of application, remain potent long after they are deposited, and constitute, in the words of one scientist, "biologic death bombs with a delayed time fuse and which may prove to be, in the long run, as dangerous to the existence of mankind as the arsenal of atom bombs.†? All of these poisons are sanctioned--or in some cases, ignored--by the EPA. For twenty-five years E.G. Vallianatos saw the EPA from the inside, with rising dismay over how pressure from politicians and threats from huge corporations were turning the it from the public's watchdog into a "polluter's protection agency." Based on his own experience, the testimony of colleagues, and hundreds of documents Vallianatos collected inside the EPA, Poison Spring reveals how the agency has continually reinforced the chemical-industrial complex. Writing with acclaimed environmental journalist McKay Jenkins, E.G. Vallianatos provides a devastating exposé of how the agency created to protect Americans and our environment has betrayed its mission. Half a century after after Rachel Carson's Silent Spring awakened us to the dangers of pesticides, we are poisoning our lands and waters with more toxic chemicals than ever.

Black, White, and Green

Farmers Markets, Race, and the Green Economy

Author: Alison Hope Alkon

Publisher: University of Georgia Press

ISBN: 0820343897

Category: Social Science

Page: 224

View: 2317

Farmers markets are much more than places to buy produce. According to advocates for sustainable food systems, they are also places to "vote with your fork" for environmental protection, vibrant communities, and strong local economies. Farmers markets have become essential to the movement for food-system reform and are a shining example of a growing green economy where consumers can shop their way to social change. Black, White, and Green brings new energy to this topic by exploring dimensions of race and class as they relate to farmers markets and the green economy. With a focus on two Bay Area markets--one in the primarily white neighborhood of North Berkeley, and the other in largely black West Oakland--Alison Hope Alkon investigates the possibilities for social and environmental change embodied by farmers markets and the green economy. Drawing on ethnographic and historical sources, Alkon describes the meanings that farmers market managers, vendors, and consumers attribute to the buying and selling of local organic food, and the ways that those meanings are raced and classed. She mobilizes this research to understand how the green economy fosters visions of social change that are compatible with economic growth while marginalizing those that are not. Black, White, and Green is one of the first books to carefully theorize the green economy, to examine the racial dynamics of food politics, and to approach issues of food access from an environmental-justice perspective. In a practical sense, Alkon offers an empathetic critique of a newly popular strategy for social change, highlighting both its strengths and limitations.

The American Farmer in the Eighteenth Century

A Social and Cultural History

Author: Richard L. Bushman

Publisher: Yale University Press

ISBN: 0300235208

Category: History

Page: 352

View: 4431

An illuminating study of America’s agricultural society during the Colonial, Revolutionary, and Founding eras In the eighteenth century, three†‘quarters of Americans made their living from farms. This authoritative history explores the lives, cultures, and societies of America’s farmers from colonial times through the founding of the nation. Noted historian Richard Bushman explains how all farmers sought to provision themselves while still actively engaged in trade, making both subsistence and commerce vital to farm economies of all sizes. The book describes the tragic effects on the native population of farmers’ efforts to provide farms for their children and examines how climate created the divide between the free North and the slave South. Bushman also traces midcentury rural violence back to the century’s population explosion. An engaging work of historical scholarship, the book draws on a wealth of diaries, letters, and other writings—including the farm papers of Thomas Jefferson and George Washington—to open a window on the men, women, and children who worked the land in early America.

The Good Food Revolution

Growing Healthy Food, People, and Communities

Author: Will Allen,Charles Wilson

Publisher: Avery

ISBN: 1592407609

Category: Biography & Autobiography

Page: 283

View: 6614

"A MacArthur ""Genius Award"" recipient and co-launcher of First Lady Michelle Obama's Let's Move! program describes his early experiences as a sharecropper's son and a KFC executive before building a preeminent urban farm to feed, educate and employ thousands of at-risk youths."

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