Search Results: black-women-in-white-america-a-documentary-history

Black Women in White America

A Documentary History

Author: Gerda Lerner

Publisher: Vintage

ISBN: 0679743146

Category: History

Page: 630

View: 2364

Compiles letters, articles, and essays on the racial and sexual oppression of Black women in America and the ways in which they have managed to survive in a white-dominated society

Women and Slavery in America

A Documentary History

Author: Catherine M. Lewis,J. Richard Lewis

Publisher: University of Arkansas Press

ISBN: 1557289581

Category: History

Page: 318

View: 4787

Women and Slavery offers readers an opportunity to examine the establishment, growth, and evolution of slavery in the United States as it impacted women-enslaved and free, African American and white, wealthy and poor, northern and southern. The primary documents-including newspaper articles, broadsides, cartoons, pamphlets, speeches, photographs, memoirs, and editorials-are organized thematically and represent cultural, political, religious, economic, and social perspectives on this dark and complex period in American history.

A Shining Thread of Hope

Author: Darlene Clark Hine,Kathleen Thompson

Publisher: Broadway Books

ISBN: 0307568229

Category: History

Page: 368

View: 7103

At the greatest moments and in the cruelest times, black women have been a crucial part of America's history. Now, the inspiring history of black women in America is explored in vivid detail by two leaders in the fields of African American and women's history. A Shining Thread of Hope chronicles the lives of black women from indentured servitude in the early American colonies to the cruelty of antebellum plantations, from the reign of lynch law in the Jim Crow South to the triumphs of the Civil Rights era, and it illustrates how the story of black women in America is as much a tale of courage and hope as it is a history of struggle. On both an individual and a collective level, A Shining Thread of Hope reveals the strength and spirit of black women and brings their stories from the fringes of American history to a central position in our understanding of the forces and events that have shaped this country. From the Trade Paperback edition.

We Specialize in the Wholly Impossible

A Reader in Black Women's History

Author: Darlene Clark Hine,Wilma King

Publisher: NYU Press

ISBN: 0926019813

Category: History

Page: 618

View: 5569

Contains essays which share the experiences and emphasize the achievements and struggles of Black women from colonial times through the 20th century

Too Heavy a Load

Black Women in Defense of Themselves, 1894-1994

Author: Deborah Gray White

Publisher: W. W. Norton & Company

ISBN: 9780393319927

Category: Social Science

Page: 320

View: 6786

Chronicles one hundred years in the struggle of African American women to attain equality and to establish a resistance to persistent racism and negative stereotyping

Black women in America

Author: Darlene Clark Hine

Publisher: N.A

ISBN: 9780195156775

Category: African American women

Page: N.A

View: 8724

Life in Black and White

Family and Community in the Slave South

Author: Brenda E. Stevenson

Publisher: Oxford University Press

ISBN: 0199923647

Category: History

Page: 496

View: 6289

Life in the old South has always fascinated Americans--whether in the mythical portrayals of the planter elite from fiction such as Gone With the Wind or in historical studies that look inside the slave cabin. Now Brenda E. Stevenson presents a reality far more gripping than popular legend, even as she challenges the conventional wisdom of academic historians. Life in Black and White provides a panoramic portrait of family and community life in and around Loudoun County, Virginia--weaving the fascinating personal stories of planters and slaves, of free blacks and poor-to-middling whites, into a powerful portrait of southern society from the mid-eighteenth century to the Civil War. Loudoun County and its vicinity encapsulated the full sweep of southern life. Here the region's most illustrious families--the Lees, Masons, Carters, Monroes, and Peytons--helped forge southern traditions and attitudes that became characteristic of the entire region while mingling with yeoman farmers of German, Scotch-Irish, and Irish descent, and free black families who lived alongside abolitionist Quakers and thousands of slaves. Stevenson brilliantly recounts their stories as she builds the complex picture of their intertwined lives, revealing how their combined histories guaranteed Loudon's role in important state, regional, and national events and controversies. Both the Declaration of Independence and the U.S. Constitution, for example, were hidden at a local plantation during the War of 1812. James Monroe wrote his famous "Doctrine" at his Loudon estate. The area also was the birthplace of celebrated fugitive slave Daniel Dangerfield, the home of John Janney, chairman of the Virginia secession convention, a center for Underground Railroad activities, and the location of John Brown's infamous 1859 raid at Harpers Ferry. In exploring the central role of the family, Brenda Stevenson offers a wealth of insight: we look into the lives of upper class women, who bore the oppressive weight of marriage and motherhood as practiced in the South and the equally burdensome roles of their husbands whose honor was tied to their ability to support and lead regardless of their personal preference; the yeoman farm family's struggle for respectability; and the marginal economic existence of free blacks and its undermining influence on their family life. Most important, Stevenson breaks new ground in her depiction of slave family life. Following the lead of historian Herbert Gutman, most scholars have accepted the idea that, like white, slaves embraced the nuclear family, both as a living reality and an ideal. Stevenson destroys this notion, showing that the harsh realities of slavery, even for those who belonged to such attentive masters as George Washington, allowed little possibility of a nuclear family. Far more important were extended kin networks and female headed households. Meticulously researched, insightful, and moving, Life in Black and White offers our most detailed portrait yet of the reality of southern life. It forever changes our understanding of family and race relations during the reign of the peculiar institution in the American South.

Glory Bound

Black Athletes in a White America

Author: David Kenneth Wiggins

Publisher: Syracuse University Press

ISBN: 9780815627340

Category: Social Science

Page: 302

View: 7019

African-American athletes have experienced a tumultuous relationship with mainstream white America. Glory Bound brings together 11 essays that explore this complex topic by sports studies scholar David K. Wiggins. In his writings, Wiggins recounts the struggle of black athletes to climb their own racial mountain - their struggle to fully participate in sport while maintaining their own cultural identity and pride.

The Unlevel Playing Field

A Documentary History of the African American Experience in Sport

Author: David Kenneth Wiggins,Patrick B. Miller

Publisher: University of Illinois Press

ISBN: 9780252028205

Category: Sports & Recreation

Page: 493

View: 5684

This extraordinarily rich compendium of primary sources charts the significant, intertwining history of African Americans and sport. The Unlevel Playing Field contains more than one hundred documents -- ranging chronologically from a challenge issued by prize fighter Tom Molineaux in the London Times in 1810 to a forward-looking interview with Harry Edwards in 2000. Introductions and head-notes provided by David K. Wiggins and Patrick B. Miller place each document in context, shaping an unrivaled narrative.Readers will find dozens of accounts taken from newspapers (both black and white), periodicals, and autobiographies, by literary and sports figures, activists, historians, and others. Frederick Douglass, W. E. B. DuBois, Booker T. Washington, Marcus Garvey, James Weldon Johnson, Richard Wright, A. S. "Doc" Young, Eldredge Cleaver, Nikki Giovanni, John Edgar Wideman, bell hooks, James Baldwin, Roy Wilkins, Henry Louis Gates, and Gerald Early are included here.Tracing the participation of blacks in American sport from the days of slavery, The Unlevel Playing Field touches on nearly every major sport and covers the full sweep of America's past. Documents include discussions of the color line in organized baseball during the Jim Crow era and athletics in the American army, as well as portraits of turn-of-the-century figures like the champion sprint cyclist Marshall "Major" Taylor and boxers George Dixon and Jack Johnson.Other selections tackle the National Tennis Association championship, high school basketball, debates over participation of black athletes in the 1968 Olympics, and the place of African American women in sport. Countless pioneering and modern-day African American athletes are spotlighted here, from Jackie Robinson, Jesse Owens, Joe Louis, Muhammad Ali, and Althea Gibson, to Michael Jordan, Tiger Woods, and Venus and Serena Williams.A thorough and informative bibliographical essay by Wiggins and Miller concludes the volume.

Blacks at Harvard

A Documentary History of African-American Experience at Harvard and Radcliffe

Author: Werner Sollors,Caldwell Titcomb,Thomas A. Underwood

Publisher: NYU Press

ISBN: 0814779735

Category: Education

Page: 548

View: 8310

An innovative departure from traditional approaches to political thought, this groundbreaking anthology includes minority ideologies where they occurred historically. By interweaving minority voices with majority documents rather than grouping them together, Political Thought in the United States presents us with a uniquely organic portrait of American political life. Beginning with the time of the explorers and early settlers, Lyman Tower Sargent presents the political beliefs and ideologies of religious minorities, women, North American Indians, and African Americans as fundamental components of American thought. Political Thought in the United States centers on two themes: the relationship between majority rule and minority rights, and the focus of power in the American system. Together with classic documents long heralded as cornerstones of American democracy, the book features writings of those opposed to the Constitution, slave petitions, Indian treaties, Emerson's Politics, works of conservatives like John Taylor and Herbert Hoover, documents from the feminist movements, labor manifestos, critiques of industrialization, and W. E. B. Du Bois's still-debated The Talented Tenth, and much more.

Fireweed

A Political Autobiography

Author: Gerda Lerner

Publisher: Temple University Press

ISBN: 9781592132362

Category: Biography & Autobiography

Page: 408

View: 2228

In Fireweed, Gerda Lerner, a pioneer and leading scholar in women's history, tells her story of moral courage and commitment to social change with a novelist's skill and a historian's command of context. Lerner's memoir focuses on the formative experiences that made her an activist for social justice before her academic career began. The child of a well-to-do Viennese Jewish family, she was still a teenager when a fascist regime came to power in 1934, and she became involved in the underground resistance movement. The Nazi takeover of Austria cast her into prison, then forced her and her family into exile; she alone was able to leave Europe. Once in the United States, she experienced the harshness of the Depression and despair over the fate of her family. Still, she persisted in adapting to the new culture and to becoming a writer. Here she met and married her life-long partner, Carl Lerner, a film editor and director. Together they become deeply involved in left-wing activities, from struggling to unionize the film industry and resisting the blacklist in Hollywood to community organizing for peace, for an interracial civil rights movement, and for better schools in New York City. Lerner insists that her decades of grassroots organizing largely account for the theoretical insights she was later able to bring to the development of women's history. In Fireweed, Lerner presents her life in the context of the major historical events of the twentieth century and the repression of dissent. Hers is a gripping story about surviving hardship and summoning the courage to live according to one's convictions. Author note: Gerda Lerner, a past president of the Organization of American Historians, is Robinson-Edwards Professor of History, Emerita, at the University of Wisconsin-Madison. Her eleven books in history include Creation of Patriarchy, Creation of Feminist Consciousness, Why History Matters, and Black Women in White America: A Documentary History.

Woman's Legacy

Essays on Race, Sex, and Class in American History

Author: Bettina Aptheker

Publisher: Univ of Massachusetts Press

ISBN: 9780870233654

Category: History

Page: 177

View: 3248

Essays on Race, Sex and Class in American History

Black Power

Radical Politics and African American Identity

Author: Jeffrey O. G. Ogbar

Publisher: JHU Press

ISBN: 9780801882753

Category: History

Page: 258

View: 1887

Uses archival sources and interviews with participants in the Nation of Islam, Black Panther Party, and other groups to explore how the Black Power movement of the 1960s affected African American identity and politics.

The Woman in American History

Author: Gerda Lerner

Publisher: N.A

ISBN: N.A

Category: Women

Page: 207

View: 4190

The Female Experience

An American Documentary

Author: Gerda Lerner

Publisher: Oxford University Press on Demand

ISBN: 0195072588

Category: History

Page: 509

View: 5804

Lerner offers an entirely new framework for the study of women's history in America which avoids the traditional chronological periods by which U.S. history is most often studied and instead groups sources according to the life cycle of women, their roles in a male-defined society, in the workplace, in politics, and finally in the contemporary world where feminism is creating an altogether new consciousness.

Black Women For Beginners

Author: S. Pearl Sharp

Publisher: Red Wheel/Weiser

ISBN: 1939994004

Category: Social Science

Page: 192

View: 6600

There are over 519 million Black Women on the planet Earth, give or take a dozen. There’s a Black Woman on each of the seven continents, in almost every country and in almost every context.mThere are even Black Women in the space program. So no matter where you go, she’s already been there. She travels with forces greater than herself. Her presence is everywhere. Black Women For Beginners is a documentary comic book that chronicles the trials and triumphs of Black Women from antiquity to the present, reflecting with wit and humor the challenges they have faced and the fortitude and strength that have sustained Black Women and patterned history with a diversity of excellence. As warriors, healers, teachers, mothers, queens, and liberators Black Women have had tremendous impact on issues from food to fashion, from politics to poetry. Replete with a glossary of reference terms, Black Women For Beginners whimsically details the influence of stereotypes on the portrayal of Black Women in various venues and punctuates the absurd.

Labor of Love, Labor of Sorrow

Black Women, Work, and the Family, from Slavery to the Present

Author: Jacqueline Jones

Publisher: Basic Books

ISBN: 0465021107

Category: History

Page: 480

View: 3327

The forces that shaped the institution of slavery in the American South endured, albeit in altered form, long after slavery was abolished. Toiling in sweltering Virginia tobacco factories or in the kitchens of white families in Chicago, black women felt a stultifying combination of racial discrimination and sexual prejudice. And yet, in their efforts to sustain family ties, they shared a common purpose with wives and mothers of all classes. In Labor of Love, Labor of Sorrow, historian Jacqueline Jones offers a powerful account of the changing role of black women, lending a voice to an unsung struggle from the depths of slavery to the ongoing fight for civil rights.

At the Dark End of the Street

Black Women, Rape, and Resistance- a New History of the Civil Rights Movement from Rosa Parks to the Rise of Black Power

Author: Danielle L. McGuire

Publisher: Vintage

ISBN: 0307389243

Category: History

Page: 392

View: 4893

A history of America's civil rights movement traces the pivotal influence of sexual violence that victimized African American women for centuries, revealing Rosa Parks's contributions as an anti-rape activist years before her heroic bus protest.

A Chosen Exile

A History of Racial Passing in American Life

Author: Allyson Hobbs

Publisher: Harvard University Press

ISBN: 0674744810

Category: Social Science

Page: 394

View: 7290

Countless African Americans have passed as white, leaving behind families and friends, roots and communities. It was, as Allyson Hobbs writes, a chosen exile. This history of passing explores the possibilities, challenges, and losses that racial indeterminacy presented to men and women living in a country obsessed with racial distinctions.

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