Search Results: british-weather-and-the-climate-of-enlightenment

British Weather and the Climate of Enlightenment

Author: Jan Golinski

Publisher: University of Chicago Press

ISBN: 0226302067

Category: Science

Page: 304

View: 5966

Enlightenment inquiries into the weather sought to impose order on a force that had the power to alter human life and social conditions. British Weather and the Climate of Enlightenment reveals how a new sense of the national climate emerged in the eighteenth century from the systematic recording of the weather, and how it was deployed in discussions of the health and welfare of the population. Enlightened intellectuals hailed climate’s role in the development of civilization but acknowledged that human existence depended on natural forces that would never submit to rational control. Reading the Enlightenment through the ideas, beliefs, and practices concerning the weather, Jan Golinski aims to reshape our understanding of the movement and its legacy for modern environmental thinking. With its combination of cultural history and the history of science, British Weather and the Climate of Enlightenment counters the claim that Enlightenment progress set humans against nature, instead revealing that intellectuals of the age drew characteristically modern conclusions about the inextricability of nature and culture.

The Power of Knowledge

How Information and Technology Made the Modern World

Author: Jeremy Black

Publisher: Yale University Press

ISBN: 030019854X

Category: History

Page: 504

View: 4686

Information is power. For more than five hundred years the success or failure of nations has been determined by a country’s ability to acquire knowledge and technical skill and transform them into strength and prosperity. Leading historian Jeremy Black approaches global history from a distinctive perspective, focusing on the relationship between information and society and demonstrating how the understanding and use of information have been the primary factors in the development and character of the modern age. Black suggests that the West’s ascension was a direct result of its institutions and social practices for acquiring, employing, and retaining information and the technology that was ultimately produced. His cogent and well-reasoned analysis looks at cartography and the hardware of communication, armaments and sea power, mercantilism and imperialism, science and astronomy, as well as bureaucracy and the management of information, linking the history of technology with the history of global power while providing important indicators for the future of our world.

The Oxford Handbook of Environmental History

Author: Andrew C. Isenberg

Publisher: Oxford University Press

ISBN: 0199394474

Category: Science

Page: 640

View: 9831

The field of environmental history emerged just decades ago but has established itself as one of the most innovative and important new approaches to history, one that bridges the human and natural world, the humanities and the sciences. With the current trend towards internationalizing history, environmental history is perhaps the quintessential approach to studying subjects outside the nation-state model, with pollution, global warming, and other issues affecting the earth not stopping at national borders. With 25 essays, this Handbook is global in scope and innovative in organization, looking at the field thematically through such categories as climate, disease, oceans, the body, energy, consumerism, and international relations.

Weather Architecture

Author: Jonathan Hill

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 1135746117

Category: Architecture

Page: 384

View: 5817

Weather Architecture further extends Jonathan Hill’s investigation of authorship by recognising the creativity of the weather. At a time when environmental awareness is of growing relevance, the overriding aim is to understand a history of architecture as a history of weather and thus to consider the weather as an architectural author that affects design, construction and use in a creative dialogue with other authors such as the architect and user. Environmental discussions in architecture tend to focus on the practical or the poetic but here they are considered together. Rather than investigate architecture’s relations to the weather in isolation, they are integrated into a wider discussion of cultural and social influences on architecture. The analysis of weather’s effects on the design and experience of specific buildings and gardens is interwoven with a historical survey of changing attitudes to the weather in the arts, sciences and society, leading to a critical re-evaluation of contemporary responses to climate change.

The Natural History of Selborne

Author: Gilbert White

Publisher: OUP Oxford

ISBN: 0191646121

Category: Literary Collections

Page: 352

View: 9008

'I was much entertained last summer with a tame bat, which would take flies out of a person's hand.' Gilbert White's Natural History of Selborne (1789) reveals a world of wonders in nature. Over a period of twenty years White describes in minute detail the behaviour of animals through the changing seasons in the rural Hampshire parish of Selborne. He notes everything from the habits of an eccentric tortoise to the mysteries of bird migration and animal reproduction, with the purpose of inspiring others to observe their own surroundings with the same pleasure and attention. Written as a series of letters, White's book has all the immediacy of an exchange with friends, yet it is crafted with compelling literary skill. His gossipy correspondence has delighted readers from Charles Darwin to Virginia Woolf, and it has been read as a nostalgic evocation of a pastoral vision, a model for local studies of plants and animals, and a precursor to modern ecology. This new edition includes contemporary illustrations, a contextualizing introduction, and an appendix of literary responses to the book. ABOUT THE SERIES: For over 100 years Oxford World's Classics has made available the widest range of literature from around the globe. Each affordable volume reflects Oxford's commitment to scholarship, providing the most accurate text plus a wealth of other valuable features, including expert introductions by leading authorities, helpful notes to clarify the text, up-to-date bibliographies for further study, and much more.

The East India Company and the Natural World

Author: V. Damodaran,A. Winterbottom,A. Lester

Publisher: Springer

ISBN: 1137427272

Category: Science

Page: 297

View: 7845

This book is the first to explore the deep and lasting impacts of the largest colonial trading company, the British East India Company on the natural environment. The contributors – drawn from a wide range of academic disciplines - illuminate the relationship between colonial capital and the changing environment between 1600 and 1857.

Weather, Local Knowledge and Everyday Life

Issues in Integrated Climate Studies

Author: Vladimir Janković,Christina Helena Barboza

Publisher: N.A

ISBN: N.A

Category: Climate and civilization

Page: 304

View: 2716

State, Science and the Skies

Governmentalities of the British Atmosphere

Author: Mark Whitehead

Publisher: Wiley-Blackwell

ISBN: 9781405191746

Category: History

Page: 296

View: 979

Utilizing environmental archival materials from the UK, State, Science and the Skies presents a groundbreaking historical account of the development of a state science of atmospheric pollution. Offers the most extensive historical and geographical account of atmospheric government and pollution in Britain, available today Presents archival material from 150 years of British history that represents an original contribution to our knowledge of the history of science and government Develops an innovative combination of Foucauldian history of government with a history of atmospheric science Raises crucial questions about the nature of state/science relations and the conditions under which environmental knowledge is produced

Science and Empire in the Atlantic World

Author: James Delbourgo,Nicholas Dew

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 1135899096

Category: History

Page: 384

View: 1521

Science and Empire in the Atlantic World is the first book in the growing field of Atlantic Studies to examine the production of scientific knowledge in the Atlantic world from a comparative and international perspective. Rather than focusing on a specific scientific field or single national context, this collection captures the multiplicity of practices, people, languages, and agendas that characterized the traffic in knowledge around the Atlantic world, linking this knowledge to the social processes fundamental to colonialism, such as travel, trade, ethnography, and slavery.

Empire and Science in the Making

Dutch Colonial Scholarship in Comparative Global Perspective, 1760-1830

Author: P. Boomgaard

Publisher: Springer

ISBN: 1137334029

Category: History

Page: 315

View: 6874

Drawing on extensive new research, and bringing much new scholarship before English readers for the first time, this wide-ranging volume examines how knowledge was created and circulated throughout the Dutch Empire, and how these processes compared with those of the Imperial Britain, Spain, and Russia.

Choice

Author: N.A

Publisher: N.A

ISBN: N.A

Category: Academic libraries

Page: N.A

View: 3482

The Experimental Self

Humphry Davy and the Making of a Man of Science

Author: Jan Golinski

Publisher: University of Chicago Press

ISBN: 022636884X

Category: Science

Page: 256

View: 2558

What did it mean to be a scientist before the profession itself existed? Jan Golinski finds an answer in the remarkable career of Humphry Davy, the foremost chemist of his day and one of the most distinguished British men of science of the nineteenth century. Originally a country boy from a modest background, Davy was propelled by his scientific accomplishments to a knighthood and the presidency of the Royal Society. An enigmatic figure to his contemporaries, Davy has continued to elude the efforts of biographers to classify him: poet, friend to Coleridge and Wordsworth, author of travel narratives and a book on fishing, chemist and inventor of the miners’ safety lamp. What are we to make of such a man? In The Experimental Self, Golinski argues that Davy’s life is best understood as a prolonged process of self-experimentation. He follows Davy from his youthful enthusiasm for physiological experiment through his self-fashioning as a man of science in a period when the path to a scientific career was not as well-trodden as it is today. What emerges is a portrait of Davy as a creative fashioner of his own identity through a lifelong series of experiments in selfhood.

The Copernican Question

Prognostication, Skepticism, and Celestial Order

Author: Robert S. Westman

Publisher: Univ of California Press

ISBN: 0520254813

Category: History

Page: 681

View: 8715

"Westman's profound understanding of his subject informs every page of this magisterial book. The Copernican Question provides a new road map to one of the central episodes in the history of science, in all its cultural, social, and philosophical complexity." —Peter Dear, author of Revolutionizing the Sciences: European Knowledge and Its Ambitions, 1500-1700 “The Copernican Question is a truly astonishing work. Westman writes with the authority of someone who has really done his homework; he tells a fascinating story and tells it exceedingly well." —Ernan McMullin, editor of The Church and Galileo “Robert Westman’s engrossing book—the fruit of many years’ research—offers the best answer given so far to the question of Copernicus. The Polish astronomer was an enigma to his contemporaries and to many who later struggled to understand his ideas. Westman shows that astrological prediction provides the missing key to his work and to its interpretation by astronomers in the subsequent decades. He sets the Copernican tradition against a backdrop of tumultuous religious conflict, apocalyptic prophecies, and the explosive growth of printed publications. This book is a magnificent scholarly achievement. Everyone who is seriously interested in the science and culture of early-modern Europe will want to read it.” —Jan Golinski, author of British Weather and the Climate of Enlightenment "Robert Westman's The Copernican Question is a magnificent achievement. It is a comprehensive, nuanced, and fascinating reinterpretation of the Copernican century and the transformation of astronomy. This book will be of interest to anyone who wants a new understanding of the history of the heliocentric hypothesis and the complex problems facing Copernicus and his contemporaries and followers." —Carolyn Merchant, author of The Death of Nature: Women, Ecology, and the Scientific Revolution “The Copernican Question is a richly detailed, extensively researched, and engagingly written book that radically recontextualizes major figures in the “science of the stars” from Copernicus to Galileo, revealing new connections and motivations for their work and ideas. It will be required reading for historians and philosophers of science and for anyone interested in how and why we came to know what we do about the heavens.” —Lawrence M. Principe, author of The Scientific Revolution: A Very Short Introduction

Bulletin of the History of Medicine ...

Author: Henry Ernest Sigerist

Publisher: N.A

ISBN: N.A

Category: Medicine

Page: N.A

View: 3873

Bulletin is the official publication of the American Association for the History of Medicine and the Johns Hopkins Institute of the History of Medicine. Each issue spans the social and scientific aspects of the history of medicine worldwide and includes reviews of recent books on medical history and information about national and international activities in the field.

International Bibliography of Book Reviews of Scholarly Literature Chiefly in the Fields of Arts and Humanities and the Social Sciences

Author: N.A

Publisher: N.A

ISBN: N.A

Category: Books

Page: N.A

View: 7210

Climates of the British Isles

Present, Past and Future

Author: Mike Hulme,Elaine Barrow

Publisher: Psychology Press

ISBN: 9780415130165

Category: Travel

Page: 454

View: 615

Embracing the full scope of the Climatic Research Unit, this book serves a broad audience with extensive new data and excellent overviews of the past, present and potential future climates of the British Isles.

Confronting the Climate

British Airs and the Making of Environmental Medicine

Author: V. Jankovic

Publisher: Springer

ISBN: 023011346X

Category: History

Page: 229

View: 1098

This book explores the social origins of the Western preoccupation with health and environmental hazards. It looks at the rise of the dichotomy between the vulnerable 'in' and the threatening 'out' by examining the pathologies associated with weather, domestic space, ventilation, clothing, and travel in Britain at the turn of the 19th century.

Der Report der Magd

Roman

Author: Margaret Atwood

Publisher: Piper ebooks

ISBN: 3492970591

Category: Fiction

Page: 400

View: 561

Die provozierende Vision eines totalitären Staats, in dem Frauen keine Rechte haben: Die Dienerin Desfred besitzt etwas, was ihr alle Machthaber, Wächter und Spione nicht nehmen können, nämlich ihre Hoffnung auf ein Entkommen, auf Liebe, auf Leben ... Margaret Atwoods »Report der Magd« wurde zum Kultbuch einer ganzen Generation und von Volker Schlöndorff unter dem Titel »Die Geschichte der Dienerin« verfilmt.

Enlightenment, Modernity and Science

Geographies of Scientific Culture and Improvement in Georgian England

Author: Paul A. Elliott

Publisher: I. B. Tauris

ISBN: N.A

Category: History

Page: 352

View: 1884

Scientific culture was one of the defining characteristics of the English Enlightenment. The latest discoveries were debated in homes, institutions and towns around the country. But how did the dissemination of scientific knowledge vary with geographical location? What were the differing influences in town and country and from region to region? Enlightenment, Modernity and Science provides the first full length study of the geographies of Georgian scientific culture in England. The author takes the reader on a tour of the principal arenas in which scientific ideas were disseminated, including home, town and countryside, to show how cultures of science and knowledge varied across the Georgian landscape. Taking in key figures such as Erasmus Darwin, Abraham Bennett, and Joseph Priestley along the way, it is a work that sheds important light on the complex geographies of Georgian English scientific culture.

Enlightened Zeal

The Hudson's Bay Company and Scientific Networks, 1670-1870

Author: Theodore Binnema

Publisher: University of Toronto Press

ISBN: 1442666951

Category: Business & Economics

Page: 488

View: 8646

Enlightened Zeal examines the fascinating history of the Hudson’s Bay Company’s involvement in scientific networks during the company’s two-hundred year chartered monopoly. Working from the company’s voluminous records, Ted Binnema demonstrates the significance of science in the company’s corporate strategies. Initially highly secretive about all of its activities, the HBC was by 1870 an exceptionally generous patron of science. Aware of the ways that a commitment to scientific research could burnish its corporate reputation, the company participated in intricate symbiotic networks that linked the HBC as a corporation with individuals and scientific organizations in England, Scotland, and the United States. The pursuit of scientific knowledge could bring wealth and influence, along with tribute, fame, and renown, but science also brought less tangible benefits: adventure, health, happiness, male companionship, self-improvement, or a sense of meaning. The first study of scientific research in any chartered company over the entire course of its monopoly, Enlightened Zeal expands our understanding of social networks in science, establishes the vast scope of the HBC’s contribution to public knowledge, and will inspire new research into the history of science in other chartered monopolies.

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