Search Results: colonial-america-and-the-early-republic

Colonial America and the Early Republic

Author: Philip N. Mulder

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 1351950568

Category: Political Science

Page: 550

View: 3326

Reflecting the best recent scholarship of Early America and the Early Republic, the articles in this collection study the many dimensions of American political history. The authors explore Native American interests and encounters with settlers, diplomatic endeavors, environmental issues, legal debates and practiced law, women's citizenship and rights, servitude and slavery and popular political activity. The geographical perspective is as expansive as the topical, with strong representation of trans-Atlantic and continental interests of many nations and peoples. The international and interdisciplinary perspectives illustrate the dynamic transformations of America during this era of settlement, conquest, development, revolution and nation building.

Property Rights in the Colonial Era and Early Republic

Author: James W. Ely

Publisher: Taylor & Francis

ISBN: 9780815326830

Category: Business & Economics

Page: 424

View: 5584

A multidisciplinary overview This new series gathers a broad selection of the best scholarly literature dealing with property rights in American constitutional history. The initial three volumes deal with the historical aspects of property ownership, many of which are relevant to contemporary developments. Another volume is devoted to the contract clause, which was the heart of a great deal of constitutional litigation. Two volumes deal directly and at length with current issues, such as regulatory takings. The authors come from a variety of disciplines, including history, law, and political science, bringing a multidisciplinary approach to the debate, and providing an excellent background for understanding contemporary issues. A versatile classroom and student research resource Because it gathers so many important articles from law reviews, academic journals, and books, including classic essays by prominent 19th-century authorities, this collection is a valuable resource for law schools. But its thorough exploration of a vital issue that has been the concern of legislators, courts, and citizens since the founding of the republic also makes it useful in American History classes. Professors will appreciate the collection because it gives them access to a concentration of material for classroom use and it's a user-friendly way to introduce students to a variety of opinions and, diversity of sources that can get them started on doing their own research. Students will appreciate the many articles as a veritable gold mine of information.

The Colonies and early Republic

Author: Eric H. Monkkonen

Publisher: N.A

ISBN: N.A

Category: History

Page: 912

View: 1859

Writing and Postcolonialism in the Early Republic

Author: Edward Watts,E. Watts

Publisher: University of Virginia Press

ISBN: 9780813917610

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 225

View: 3741

Writing and Postcolonialism in the Early Republic is the first book-length analysis of early American literature through the lens of postcolonial theory. Although the United States represented a colonizing presence that displaced indigenous peoples and exported imperial culture, American colonists also found themselves exiled, often exploited and abused by the distant metropolitan center. In this innovative book, Edward Watts demonstrates how American post-Revolutionary literature exhibits characteristics of a postcolonial society.The author identifies six texts that particularly exhibit postcolonial qualities: Irving's Knickerbocker's History of New York, Brown's Arthur Mervyn, Murray's The Gleaner, Brackenridge's Modern Chivalry, Tyler's The Algerine Captive, and Watterston's The Lawyer. In each of these books a fictional protagonist attempts to write about the American experience using the language and genres left over from the colonial period. As the fictional authors fail, Watts suggests,we see the,real authors challenging and subverting the lingering colonial culture and its centrality to republican versions of the new nation. In the terms of contemporary postcolonial scholarship from Australia, Canada, and New Zealand, these early American authors worked to decolonize American writing by freeing it from vestigial British conventions.

Geschichte der Todesstrafe in Nordamerika

von der Kolonialzeit bis zur Gegenwart

Author: Jürgen Martschukat

Publisher: C.H.Beck

ISBN: 9783406476112

Category: Capital punishment

Page: 223

View: 1374

From Africa to America

African American History from the Colonial Era to the Early Republic, 1526-1790

Author: William Dillon Piersen

Publisher: Twayne Pub

ISBN: N.A

Category: History

Page: 177

View: 5349

Examines the presence of Africans in America from 1526, when the slaves of a Spanish expedition rebelled and settled among local Native Americans

America's Three Regimes

A New Political History

Author: Morton Keller

Publisher: Oxford University Press

ISBN: 0199924171

Category: History

Page: 384

View: 5545

Hailed in The New York Times Book Review as "the single best book written in recent years on the sweep of American political history," this groundbreaking work divides our nation's history into three "regimes," each of which lasts many, many decades, allowing us to appreciate as never before the slow steady evolution of American politics, government, and law. The three regimes, which mark longer periods of continuity than traditional eras reflect, are Deferential and Republican, from the colonial period to the 1820s; Party and Democratic, from the 1830s to the 1930s; and Populist and Bureaucratic, from the 1930s to the present. Praised by The Economist as "a feast to enjoy" and by Foreign Affairs as "a masterful and fresh account of U.S. politics," here is a major contribution to the history of the United States--an entirely new way to look at our past, our present, and our future--packed with provocative and original observations about American public life.

The Religious Roots of the First Amendment

Dissenting Protestants and the Separation of Church and State

Author: Nicholas P. Miller

Publisher: Oxford University Press

ISBN: 0199942803

Category: Religion

Page: 272

View: 2449

Traditional understandings of the genesis of the separation of church and state rest on assumptions about "Enlightenment" and the republican ethos of citizenship. In The Religious Roots of the First Amendment, Nicholas P. Miller does not seek to dislodge that interpretation but to augment and enrich it by recovering its cultural and discursive religious contexts--specifically the discourse of Protestant dissent. He argues that commitments by certain dissenting Protestants to the right of private judgment in matters of Biblical interpretation, an outgrowth of the doctrine of the priesthood of all believers, helped promote religious disestablishment in the early modern West. This movement climaxed in the disestablishment of religion in the early American colonies and nation. Miller identifies a continuous strand of this religious thought from the Protestant Reformation, across Europe, through the English Reformation, Civil War, and Restoration, into the American colonies. He examines seven key thinkers who played a major role in the development of this religious trajectory as it came to fruition in American political and legal history: William Penn, John Locke, Elisha Williams, Isaac Backus, William Livingston, John Witherspoon, and James Madison. Miller shows that the separation of church and state can be read, most persuasively, as the triumph of a particular strand of Protestant nonconformity-that which stretched back to the Puritan separatist and the Restoration sects, rather than to those, like Presbyterians, who sought to replace the "wrong" church establishment with their own, "right" one. The Religious Roots of the First Amendment contributes powerfully to the current trend among some historians to rescue the eighteenth-century clergymen and religious controversialists from the enormous condescension of posterity.

Liberty, Equality, Power: A History of the American People, Volume II: Since 1863, Concise Edition

Author: John M. Murrin,Paul E. Johnson,James M. McPherson,Alice Fahs,Gary Gerstle

Publisher: Cengage Learning

ISBN: 1133947743

Category: History

Page: 496

View: 3670

How did America transform itself, in a relatively short time, from a land inhabited by hunter-gatherer and agricultural Native American societies into the most powerful industrial nation on earth? You'll find out in LIBERTY, EQUALITY, POWER: A HISTORY OF THE AMERICAN PEOPLE, CONCISE Sixth Edition. The authors tell this story through the lens of three major themes: liberty, equality, and power. You'll learn not only the impact of the notions of liberty and equality but also how dominant and subordinate groups have affected and been affected by the ever-shifting balance of power. Important Notice: Media content referenced within the product description or the product text may not be available in the ebook version.

Liberty, Equality, Power: A History of the American People, Concise Edition

Author: John M. Murrin,Paul E. Johnson,James M. McPherson,Alice Fahs,Gary Gerstle

Publisher: Cengage Learning

ISBN: 113394762X

Category: History

Page: 896

View: 3436

How did America transform itself, in a relatively short time, from a land inhabited by hunter-gatherer and agricultural Native American societies into the most powerful industrial nation on earth? You'll find out in LIBERTY, EQUALITY, POWER: A HISTORY OF THE AMERICAN PEOPLE, CONCISE Sixth Edition. The authors tell this story through the lens of three major themes: liberty, equality, and power. You'll learn not only the impact of the notions of liberty and equality but also how dominant and subordinate groups have affected and been affected by the ever-shifting balance of power. Important Notice: Media content referenced within the product description or the product text may not be available in the ebook version.

Liberty, Equality, Power: A History of the American People, Volume 2: Since 1863

Author: John Murrin,Paul Johnson,James McPherson,Alice Fahs,Gary Gerstle

Publisher: Cengage Learning

ISBN: 0495915882

Category: History

Page: 576

View: 6864

A highly respected, balanced, and thoroughly modern approach to US History, LIBERTY, EQUALITY, POWER, uses these three themes to show how the United States was transformed from hunter-gatherer and agricultural Native American societies into the most powerful industrial nation on earth. This approach helps students understand the impact of the notions of liberty and equality, which are often associated with the American story, and also how dominant and subordinate groups have affected and been affected by the ever-shifting balance of power. The text integrates the best of recent social and cultural scholarship -- including fun material on music and movies -- into a political story, offering students the most comprehensive and complete understanding of American history available. Available in the following split options: LIBERTY, EQUALITY, POWER, Sixth Edition (Chapters 1-32), ISBN: 978-0-495-90499-1; Volume 1: To 1877 (Chapters 1-17), ISBN: 978-0-495-91587-4; Volume 2: Since 1863 (Chapters 17-32), ISBN: 978-0-495-91588-1. Important Notice: Media content referenced within the product description or the product text may not be available in the ebook version.

Liberty, Equality, Power: A History of the American People, Volume I: To 1877, Concise Edition

Author: John M. Murrin,Paul E. Johnson,James M. McPherson,Alice Fahs,Gary Gerstle

Publisher: Cengage Learning

ISBN: 1285657519

Category: History

Page: 480

View: 2479

How did America transform itself, in a relatively short time, from a land inhabited by hunter-gatherer and agricultural Native American societies into the most powerful industrial nation on earth? You'll find out in LIBERTY, EQUALITY, POWER: A HISTORY OF THE AMERICAN PEOPLE, CONCISE Sixth Edition. The authors tell this story through the lens of three major themes: liberty, equality, and power. You'll learn not only the impact of the notions of liberty and equality but also how dominant and subordinate groups have affected and been affected by the ever-shifting balance of power. Important Notice: Media content referenced within the product description or the product text may not be available in the ebook version.

Poetry Wars

Verse and Politics in the American Revolution and Early Republic

Author: Colin Wells

Publisher: University of Pennsylvania Press

ISBN: 0812249658

Category: History

Page: 352

View: 4359

The pen was as mighty as the musket during the American Revolution, as poets waged literary war against politicians, journalists, and each other. Drawing on hundreds of poems, Poetry Wars reconstructs the important public role of poetry in the early republic and examines the reciprocal relationship between political conflict and verse.

The Poems of Edward Taylor

A Reference Guide

Author: Rosemary Fithian Guruswamy

Publisher: Greenwood Publishing Group

ISBN: 9780313317811

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 133

View: 8065

Edward Taylor (1642-1729) was one of the most influential ministers in Puritan New England. He was also a prolific but unpublished poet. With the discovery of his poetry in 1936 and the publication of a nearly complete volume in 1960, his reputation as the premiere early American poet has grown immensely. Beginning with an overview of his life and times, this reference analyzes Taylor's poems in light of Puritan doctrine and his thoughts about poetry. The book traces the genesis of his works, their editorial and publication history, and the complex cultural and historical background of his writings.

The Early Republic and Antebellum America

An Encyclopedia of Social, Political, Cultural, and Economic History

Author: Christopher G. Bates

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 1317457404

Category: History

Page: 1400

View: 9714

First Published in 2015. Routledge is an imprint of Taylor & Francis, an Informa company.

Early American Technology

Making and Doing Things from the Colonial Era to 1850

Author: Judith A. McGaw

Publisher: UNC Press Books

ISBN: 9780807844847

Category: History

Page: 482

View: 8504

This collection of original essays documents technology's centrality to the history of early America. Unlike much previous scholarship, this volume emphasizes the quotidian rather than the exceptional: the farm household seeking to preserve food or acquir

Torture and State Violence in the United States

A Short Documentary History

Author: Robert M. Pallitto

Publisher: JHU Press

ISBN: 1421402491

Category: History

Page: 272

View: 1492

"Organized around five broad thematic periods in American history--colonial America and the early republic; slavery and the frontier; imperialism, Jim Crow, and World Wars I and II; the Cold War, Vietnam, and police torture; and the war on terror--this annotated documentary history traces the low and high points of official attitudes toward state violence."--Page 4 of cover.

Race and the Early Republic

Racial Consciousness and Nation-Building in the Early Republic

Author: Michael A. Morrison,James Brewer Stewart

Publisher: Rowman & Littlefield Publishers

ISBN: 1461715059

Category: History

Page: 216

View: 7707

By 1840, American politics was a paradox—unprecedented freedom and equality for men of European descent, and the simultaneous isolation and degradation of people of African and Native American descent. Historians have characterized this phenomenon as the "white republic." Race and the Early Republic offers a rich account of how this paradox evolved, beginning with the fledgling nation of the 1770s and running through the antebellum years. The essays in the volume, written by a wide array of scholars, are arranged so as to allow a clear understanding of how and why white political supremacy came to be in the early United States. Race and the Early Republic is a collection of diverse, insightful and interrelated essays that promote an easy understanding of why and how people of color were systematically excluded from the early U.S. republic.

Church and State in America

The First Two Centuries

Author: James H. Hutson

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

ISBN: 1139467905

Category: History

Page: N.A

View: 628

This is an account of the ideas about and public policies relating to the relationship between government and religion from the settlement of Virginia in 1607 to the presidency of Andrew Jackson, 1829–37. This book describes the impact and the relationship of various events, legislative, and judicial actions, including the English Toleration Act of 1689, the First and Second Great Awakenings, the Constitution of the United States, the Bill of Rights, and Jefferson's Letter to the Danbury Baptists. Four principles were paramount in the American approach to government's relation to religion: the importance of religion to public welfare; the resulting desirability of government support of religion (within the limitations of political culture); liberty of conscience and voluntaryism; the requirement that religion be supported by free will offerings, not taxation. Hutson analyzes and describes the development and interplay of these principles, and considers the relevance of the concept of the separation of church and state during this period.

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