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Colonial America To 1763

Author: Thomas L. Purvis

Publisher: Infobase Publishing

ISBN:

Category: United States

Page: 400

View: 928

Chronicles life in the United States during the Colonial period, including information on weather, economy, population, religion, education, arts and letters, and popular culture.

Colonial America

A History to 1763

Author: Richard Middleton

Publisher: John Wiley & Sons

ISBN:

Category: History

Page: 624

View: 142

Colonial America: A History to 1763, 4th Edition provides updated and revised coverage of the background, founding, and development of the thirteen English North American colonies. Fully revised and expanded fourth edition, with updated bibliography Includes new coverage of the simultaneous development of French, Spanish, and Dutch colonies in North America, and extensively re-written and updated chapters on families and women Features enhanced coverage of the English colony of Barbados and trans-Atlantic influences on colonial development Provides a greater focus on the perspectives of Native Americans and their influences in shaping the development of the colonies

From Columbus to Colonial America

1492 to 1763

Author: Britannica Educational Publishing

Publisher: Britannica Educational Publishing

ISBN:

Category: Juvenile Nonfiction

Page: 152

View: 793

The New World, as the land that comprises the United States was once known, held the promise of opportunity and changing fortunes for those who discovered and colonized it. Even before becoming an independent nation, the land proved to be a bounteous yet challenging home. This lively volume recounts the early history of America, using a diverse selection of the era’s personal and historic documents as guideposts.

Taxation in Colonial America

Author: Alvin Rabushka

Publisher: Princeton University Press

ISBN:

Category: History

Page: 968

View: 551

Taxation in Colonial America examines life in the thirteen original American colonies through the revealing lens of the taxes levied on and by the colonists. Spanning the turbulent years from the founding of the Jamestown settlement to the outbreak of the American Revolution, Alvin Rabushka provides the definitive history of taxation in the colonial era, and sets it against the backdrop of enormous economic, political, and social upheaval in the colonies and Europe. Rabushka shows how the colonists strove to minimize, avoid, and evade British and local taxation, and how they used tax incentives to foster settlement. He describes the systems of public finance they created to reduce taxation, and reveals how they gained control over taxes through elected representatives in colonial legislatures. Rabushka takes a comprehensive look at the external taxes imposed on the colonists by Britain, the Netherlands, and Sweden, as well as internal direct taxes like poll and income taxes. He examines indirect taxes like duties and tonnage fees, as well as county and town taxes, church and education taxes, bounties, and other charges. He links the types and amounts of taxes with the means of payment--be it gold coins, agricultural commodities, wampum, or furs--and he compares tax systems and burdens among the colonies and with Britain. This book brings the colonial period to life in all its rich complexity, and shows how colonial attitudes toward taxation offer a unique window into the causes of the revolution.

Learning to Read and Write in Colonial America

Author: E. Jennifer Monaghan

Publisher: Univ of Massachusetts Press

ISBN:

Category: Education

Page: 491

View: 818

An experienced teacher of reading and writing and an award-winning historian, E. Jennifer Monaghan brings to vibrant life the process of learning to read and write in colonial America. Ranging throughout the colonies from New Hampshire to Georgia, she examines the instruction of girls and boys, Native Americans and enslaved Africans, the privileged and the poor, revealing the sometimes wrenching impact of literacy acquisition on the lives of learners. For the most part, religious motives underlay reading instruction in colonial America, while secular motives led to writing instruction. Monaghan illuminates the history of these activities through a series of deeply researched and readable case studies. An Anglican missionary battles mosquitoes and loneliness to teach the New York Mohawks to write in their own tongue. Puritan fathers model scriptural reading for their children as they struggle with bereavement. Boys in writing schools, preparing for careers in counting houses, wield their quill pens in the difficult task of mastering a "good hand." Benjamin Franklin learns how to compose essays with no teacher but himself. Young orphans in Georgia write precocious letters to their benefactor, George Whitefield, while schools in South Carolina teach enslaved black children to read but never to write. As she tells these stories, Monaghan clears new pathways in the analysis of colonial literacy. She pioneers in exploring the implications of the separation of reading and writing instruction, a topic that still resonates in today's classrooms. Monaghan argues that major improvements occurred in literacy instruction and acquisition after about 1750, visible in rising rates of signature literacy. Spelling books were widely adopted as they key text for teaching young children to read; prosperity, commercialism, and a parental urge for gentility aided writing instruction, benefiting girls in particular. And a gentler vision of childhood arose, portraying children as more malleable than sinful. It promoted and even commercialized a new kind of children's book designed to amuse instead of convert, laying the groundwork for the "reading revolution" of the new republic.

Daily Life in the Colonial City

Author: Keith T. Krawczynski

Publisher: ABC-CLIO

ISBN:

Category: History

Page: 554

View: 281

An exploration of day-to-day urban life in colonial America.

Colonial America in an Atlantic World

A Story of Creative Interaction

Author: T. H. Breen

Publisher: Pearson College Division

ISBN:

Category: History

Page: 387

View: 965

The book presents the Atlantic coast history as a story of interaction and adaptation among the peoples of the four continents, and discusses the variety of social, political, environmental, and cultural processes set in motion by European exploration and settlement. Beginning with a chapter on the pre-Columbian background of Europe, Africa, and North and South America, this lively narrative traces the history of colonial America to 1763. Covering British, Spanish, French, and Dutch colonization, the book examines colonial development in the North American colonies along the Atlantic coast and in the borderlands, the North American interior, and the Caribbean.

Colonial America, 1543-1763

Author: Tim McNeese

Publisher: Infobase Publishing

ISBN:

Category: United States

Page: 136

View: 729

From the final decades of the 1500s through the mid-1700s, the North American continent witnessed a whirlwind of competition and colonization as European powers vied to establish their place in the northern reaches of the New World. Each power--whether England, France, Holland, Spain, or others--relied on strong-willed individuals who were driven by motives as different as night and day--from religious freedom to gold and glory. These adventurous people served as conquerors and colonists, explorers and evangelists, promoters and profiteers, farmers and freemen, Puritans and planters, sovereigns and servants. Before the era of European colonization in North America was complete, each had made his or her contribution, creating possibilities for themselves and their descendents in America that many had never thought possible. Learn how these colonists flourished in the midst of overwhelming obstacles in Colonial America: 1543-1763.

The shaping of North America from earliest times to 1763

Author: Isaac Asimov

Publisher:

ISBN:

Category: History

Page: 261

View: 111

An Empire of Regions

A Brief History of Colonial British America

Author: Eric Nellis

Publisher: University of Toronto Press

ISBN:

Category: History

Page: 368

View: 608

An Empire of Regions is a refreshing interpretation of British American history that demonstrates how the thirteen British mainland colonies grew to function as self-governing entities in distinct regional clusters. In lucid prose, Eric Nellis invites readers to explore the circumstances leading to the colonies' collective defense of their individual interests, and to reevaluate the founding principles of the United States. There is considerable discussion of social conditions and of the British background to the colonies' development. Extensive treatment of slavery, the slave trade, and native populations is provided, while detailed maps illustrate colony boundaries, settlement growth, and the impact of the Proclamation Line. This absorbing and compelling narrative will captivate both newcomers to and enthusiasts of American history.

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