Search Results: conflict-after-the-cold-war

Conflict After the Cold War

Arguments on Causes of War and Peace

Author: Richard K. Betts

Publisher: Taylor & Francis

ISBN: 1351864874

Category: History

Page: 682

View: 3884

Edited by one of the most renowned scholars in the field, Richard Betts' Conflict After the Cold War assembles classic and contemporary readings on enduring problems of international security. Offering broad historical and philosophical breadth, the carefully chosen and excerpted selections in this popular reader help students engage key debates over the future of war and the new forms that violent conflict will take. Conflict After the Cold War encourages closer scrutiny of the political, economic, social, and military factors that drive war and peace. New to the Fifth Edition: Original introductions to each of 10 major parts as well as to the book as a whole have been updated by the author. An entirely new section (Part IX) on "Threat Assessment and Misjudgment" explores fundamental problems in diagnosing danger, understanding strategic choices, and measuring costs against benefits in wars over limited stakes. 12 new readings have been added or revised: Fred C. Iklé, "The Dark Side of Progress" G. John Ikenberry, "China’s Choice" Kenneth N. Waltz, "Why Nuclear Proliferation May Be Good" Daniel Byman, "Drones: Technology Serves Strategy" Audrey Kurth Cronin, "Drones: Tactics Undermine Strategy" Eyre Crowe and Thomas Sanderson, "The German Threat? 1907" Neville Henderson, "The German Threat? 1938" Vladimir Putin, "The Threat to Ukraine from the West" Eliot A. Cohen, "The Russian Threat" James C. Thomson, Jr., "How Could Vietnam Happen? An Autopsy" Stephen Biddle, "Afghanistan’s Legacy" Martin C. Libicki, "Why Cyberdeterrence is Different"

Conflict After the Cold War

Arguments on Causes of War and Peace

Author: N.A

Publisher: Pearson College Division

ISBN: 9780205583522

Category: Political Science

Page: 654

View: 1230

Edited by one of the most renowned scholars in the field, Richard Betts' Conflict After the Cold War assembles classic and contemporary readings that argue about the shape of international conflict in this post-Cold War and post-9/11 era. Contextualized within a broader philosophical and historical context, the carefully chosen and excerpted selections in this popular reader introduce students to the core debates about the causes and the future of war and peace. Through the precision of its approach and attention to new issues, this reader challenges conventional wisdom and encourages more critical examination of the political, economic, social, and military factors that underlie political violence.

International Conflict Resolution After the Cold War

Author: National Research Council,Division of Behavioral and Social Sciences and Education,Commission on Behavioral and Social Sciences and Education,Committee on International Conflict Resolution

Publisher: National Academies Press

ISBN: 9780309171731

Category: Political Science

Page: 644

View: 9184

The end of the Cold War has changed the shape of organized violence in the world and the ways in which governments and others try to set its limits. Even the concept of international conflict is broadening to include ethnic conflicts and other kinds of violence within national borders that may affect international peace and security. What is not yet clear is whether or how these changes alter the way actors on the world scene should deal with conflict: Do the old methods still work? Are there new tools that could work better? How do old and new methods relate to each other? International Conflict Resolution After the Cold War critically examines evidence on the effectiveness of a dozen approaches to managing or resolving conflict in the world to develop insights for conflict resolution practitioners. It considers recent applications of familiar conflict management strategies, such as the use of threats of force, economic sanctions, and negotiation. It presents the first systematic assessments of the usefulness of some less familiar approaches to conflict resolution, including truth commissions, "engineered" electoral systems, autonomy arrangements, and regional organizations. It also opens up analysis of emerging issues, such as the dilemmas facing humanitarian organizations in complex emergencies. This book offers numerous practical insights and raises key questions for research on conflict resolution in a transforming world system.

Coping with Conflict After the Cold War

Author: Edward A. Kolodziej,Roger E. Kanet

Publisher: N.A

ISBN: N.A

Category: Political Science

Page: 407

View: 6536

This volume provides answers to the question of how the international community might cope with armed conflict after the Cold War. It identifies key actors--states and international organizations--that have the resources and (potentially) the will to address the problems of continuing violence and enduring conflicts. The book also evaluates the roles and strategies that might be adopted by these actors, unilaterally or cooperatively, to ease or end such armed struggles. The authors review the role of the United States, Russia, Japan, and China, all of which have the potential to play constructive roles in resolving conflicts. They also explore the contributions that the United Nations, the European Community, and other transnational organizations can make to building a more peaceful and secure world. Instead of appealing to grand theory as a guide for coping, the authors conclude, different mixes of actors, resources, roles, and strategies will have to be fashioned to meet the special needs of each conflict. Coping is viewed as an international imperative and not as the responsibility or prerogative of any one actor. The volume will be of interest to anyone concerned with international relations, international organizations, and security issues. Contributors are Arthur J. Alexander, Mohammed Ayoob, Nicole Ball, Paul F. Diehl, Roger E. Kanet, Samuel S. Kim, Edward A. Kolodziej, Edward J. Laurence, David F. Linowes, Patrick M. Morgan, Jack Snyder, Janice Gross Stein, and I. William Zartman.

Diplomacy and Psychology

Prevention of Armed Conflicts After the Cold War

Author: Tommy Gärling,Gunnel Backenroth-Ohsako,Bo Ekehammar

Publisher: N.A

ISBN: 9789812104496

Category: Conflict management

Page: 327

View: 2578

Peace and conflict issues after the Cold War

Author: Asbjørn Eide,African Peace Research Institute

Publisher: United Nations Educational

ISBN: N.A

Category: Political Science

Page: 226

View: 7769

International Conflict Resolution After the Cold War

Author: Daniel Druckman,National Research Council (U.S.). Committee on International Conflict Resolution

Publisher: Pearson Education

ISBN: 9780309070270

Category: History

Page: 626

View: 8445

Annotation To help develop insights for conflict resolution practitioners, the Committee examines evidence on the effectiveness of a dozen approaches to managing or resolving conflict in the world. It considers recent applications of familiar strategies such as threats of force, economic sanctions, and negotiations. It also assesses some less familiar approaches, including truth commissions, engineered electoral systems, and autonomy arrangements. Annotation c. Book News, Inc., Portland, OR (booknews.com).

Third World conflicts and international order after the Cold War

Author: Amitav Acharya

Publisher: N.A

ISBN: N.A

Category: Political Science

Page: 28

View: 5322

The New UN Peacekeeping

Building Peace in Lands of Conflict After the Cold War

Author: Steven R. Ratner

Publisher: Macmillan

ISBN: 9780312164485

Category: Political Science

Page: 322

View: 7908

As the United Nations passes its fiftieth anniversary, it has undergone a sea change in its approach toward peacekeeping. Originally a stopgap measure to preserve a cease-fire, peacekeeping has, since the waning of the Cold War, become a means to implement an agreed political solution to conflict between antagonists. Placed inside war-torn states, UN peacekeepers have encountered manifold new challenges through oversight of elections, protection of human rights, and reconstructing of governmental administration. In this study, Steven R. Ratner offers a comprehensive framework for scholars, policy-makers, and all those seeking to understand this new peacekeeping. He sees the UN as an administrator, mediator, and guarantor of political settlements - roles that can conflict when peace accords unravel, as is all too common. He describes the numerous actors, inside and outside the UN, who are engaged in this process, often with competing interests. And in historical review, beginning with the League of Nations, he reveals many striking precedents long before the 1990s. In the central case-study, Ratner applies his thesis to the most ambitious UN operation completed, the Cambodia mission of 1991-93. After reconstructing the process leading to the massive UN role, he reviews and appraises its performance, offering a sophisticated critique demonstrating the dangers of quick 'success' or 'failure' verdicts. With the experiences of those operations in mind, he concludes with a set of compelling recommendations for the UN's members.

New Un Peacekeeping

Building Peace In Lands Of Conflict After The Cold War

Author: Steven R Ratner

Publisher: Palgrave Macmillan

ISBN: 9780312124151

Category: Political Science

Page: 322

View: 5832

As the United Nations passes its fiftieth anniversary, it has undergone a sea change in its approach toward peacekeeping. Originally a stopgap measure to preserve a cease-fire, peacekeeping has, since the waning of the Cold War, become a means to implement an agreed political solution to conflict between antagonists. Placed inside war-torn states, UN peacekeepers have encountered manifold new challenges through oversight of elections, protection of human rights, and reconstructing of governmental administration. In this study, Steven R. Ratner offers a comprehensive framework for scholars, policy-makers, and all those seeking to understand this new peacekeeping. He sees the UN as an administrator, mediator, and guarantor of political settlements - roles that can conflict when peace accords unravel, as is all too common. He describes the numerous actors, inside and outside the UN, who are engaged in this process, often with competing interests. And in historical review, beginning with the League of Nations, he reveals many striking precedents long before the 1990s. In the central case-study, Ratner applies his thesis to the most ambitious UN operation completed, the Cambodia mission of 1991-93. After reconstructing the process leading to the massive UN role, he reviews and appraises its performance, offering a sophisticated critique demonstrating the dangers of quick 'success' or 'failure' verdicts. With the experiences of those operations in mind, he concludes with a set of compelling recommendations for the UN's members.

Council Unbound

The Growth of UN Decision Making on Conflict and Postconflict Issues After the Cold War

Author: Michael John Matheson

Publisher: US Institute of Peace Press

ISBN: 9781929223794

Category: History

Page: 422

View: 4368

"In this book, Michael Matheson examines the Security Council's new, expansive exercise of legal authority in this period and its devising of bold and innovative methods - coercive and noncoercive - to stop nascent wars and "threats to the peace," includi

After the Cold War

Security and Democracy in Africa and Asia

Author: William Hale,Eberhard Kienle

Publisher: I.B.Tauris

ISBN: 9781860641367

Category: History

Page: 294

View: 642

The end of the Cold War produced dramatic changes in the Third World. Written by a group of distinguished scholars, this book explores the impact of this transformation on the regional conflicts and domestic political systems of Asia and Africa. Examines the transformations now taking place in those parts of the world which, by and large, did not normally occupy center stage in the global Cold War conflict, although they were affected by it and its demise. The volume's eleven contributions address such issues as how the end of the superpower conflict has changed the relative power of Asian and African states within their own regions; how it has affected their internal political structures; and how communist and leftist movements in Africa and Asia have adapted themselves to the transformed global environment.

The Oxford Handbook of the Cold War

Author: Richard H. Immerman,Petra Goedde

Publisher: Oxford University Press

ISBN: 0199236968

Category: History

Page: 660

View: 2653

Thirty four essays by a team of leading scholars offering a broad reassessment of the cold war, calling into question orthodox ways of ordering the chronology of the period and presenting new insights into the global dimension of the conflict.

Guerrilla Conflict Before the Cold War

Author: Anthony James Joes

Publisher: Greenwood Publishing Group

ISBN: 9780275954826

Category: History

Page: 209

View: 8419

Examines guerrilla warfare from the American Revolution to Vietnam.

Third World Conflict and American Response in the Post-Cold War World

Author: Donald M. Snow

Publisher: N.A

ISBN: N.A

Category: Cold War

Page: 60

View: 6504

Africa After the Cold War

The Changing Perspectives on Security

Author: Adebayo Oyebade,Abiodun Alao

Publisher: Africa World Press

ISBN: 9780865436510

Category: History

Page: 228

View: 3733

Although it is widely recognised that Africa's security problems are acute, it has never been a subject of much intellectual inquiry. This lack of scholarly discourse on the many dimensions of the problems of African security is the major consideration of this book. The approach to the questions of security differ markedly from the traditional approach that gives primacy to the threat of military aggression as sole factor in state security. A departure must be made from this dominant preoccupation in a new global order that has seen profound changes.

Why the Cold War Ended

A Range of Interpretations

Author: Ralph Summy,Michael E. Salla

Publisher: Greenwood Publishing Group

ISBN: 9780313295690

Category: History

Page: 278

View: 1499

Did the West "win" the Cold War? Was it a genuine or a contrived conflict? When did it begin? How was its cause related to its end? Has it ended, or has it merely changed? In this volume, contributors assess the combination of socio-political forces and events they attribute to the ending of the Cold War. In diverse theories they challenge the self-serving orthodoxy that claims Western military prowess, economic strength, and ideological superiority produced "the triumph."

The First Vietnam War

Colonial Conflict and Cold War Crisis

Author: Mark Atwood Lawrence,Fredrik Logevall

Publisher: Harvard University Press

ISBN: 9780674023710

Category: History

Page: 374

View: 3065

In this work, scholars examine various dimensions of the struggle between France and Vietnamese revolutionaries that began in 1945 and reached its climax at Dien Bien Phu. Several essays break new ground in the study of the Vietnamese revolution and the establishment of the political and military apparatus that successfully challenged both France and the United States. Other essays explore the roles of China, France, Great Britain, and the United States, all of which contributed to the transformation of the conflict from a colonial skirmish to a Cold War crisis. --From publisher's description.

Dilemmas of Diversity After the Cold War

Analyses of "cultural Difference" by U.S. and Russia-based Scholars

Author: Michele R. Rivkin-Fish,Elena Trubina

Publisher: Woodrow Wilson Center

ISBN: 1933549920

Category: History

Page: 243

View: 9174

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