Search Results: connie-the-marvellous-life-of-learie-constantine

Connie

The Marvellous Life of Learie Constantine

Author: Harry Pearson

Publisher: Little, Brown Book Group

ISBN: 1408705710

Category: Biography & Autobiography

Page: 400

View: 2914

His father was a first-class cricketer, his grandfather was a slave. Born in rural Trinidad in 1901, Learie Constantine was the most dynamic all-round cricketer of his age (1928-1939) when he played Test cricket for the West Indies and club cricket for Nelson. Few who saw Constantine in action would ever forget the experience. As well as the cricketing genius that led to Constantine being described as 'the most original cricketer of his time', Connie illuminates the world that he grew up in, a place where the memories of slavery were still fresh and where a peculiar, almost obsessive, devotion to 'Englishness' created a society that was often more British than Britain itself. Harry Pearson looks too at the society Constantine came to in England, which he would embrace as much as it embraced him: the narrow working-class world of the industrial North during a time of grave economic depression. Connie reveals how a flamboyant showman from the West Indies actually dovetailed rather well in a place where local music-hall stars such as George Formby, Frank Randle and Gracie Fields were f?ted as heroes, and how Lancashire League cricket fitted into this world of popular entertainment. Connie tells an uplifting story about sport and prejudice, genius and human decency, and the unlikely cultural exchange between two very different places - the tropical island of Trinidad and the cloth-manufacturing towns of northern England - which shared the common language of cricket.

Edging Towards Darkness

The story of the last timeless Test

Author: John Lazenby

Publisher: Bloomsbury Publishing

ISBN: 1472941292

Category: Sports & Recreation

Page: 320

View: 961

Cricket matches didn't always top out at five days, regardless of a result or not – they used to be 'timeless', with play continuing until one team won, no matter how many days that took. The last of these – which took place in Durban in 1939, in a series pitched against the backdrop of impending war – is now universally acknowledged as 'the timeless Test'. Weighing in at a prodigious ten days – the match stretched from 3–14 March 1939, and allowed for two rest days, while one day's play (the eighth) was lost entirely to rain – it is quite simply the longest Test ever played. A litany of records also perished in its wake and 'whole pages of Wisden were ruthlessly made obsolete'. If that was not enough, one player, the fastidious South African batsman Ken Viljoen, felt the need to have his hair cut twice during the game. Only the matches between Australia and England at Melbourne in 1929, which lasted eight playing days, and West Indies and England at Sabina Park, Jamaica, a year later (seven days), come remotely close in terms of their duration. In Edging Towards Darkness, John Lazenby tells the story of that Test for the first time. Set firmly in its historical and social setting, the story balances this game against the threat of encroaching world war in Europe – unfolding at terrifying speed – before bringing these two disparate strands together in an evocative and vibrant denouement.

Gentleman & Player

The Story of Colin Cowdrey, Cricket's Most Elegant and Charming Batsman

Author: Andrew Murtagh

Publisher: Pitch Publishing

ISBN: 1785313452

Category: Sports & Recreation

Page: 352

View: 5095

Colin Cowdrey is remembered for the elegance of his strokeplay; but there was more to this complex man than a classical cover drive. Successes were numerous: 114 Test matches, 22 Test hundreds, 100 first-class centuries, countless famous victories and unforgettable innings. There was controversy and disappointment too, chief among them being repeated snubs for the England captaincy and the D'Oliveira Affair. Cowdrey was involved in three of England's most memorable Tests: Lord's in 1963 against the West Indies, batting at 11 with his arm in plaster, two balls left and all four results possible; Trinidad in 1968 in which England secured a famous victory against the West Indies; and The Oval in 1968 when England gained an improbable final-over win against Australia. In later life, he shone as an administrative leader - as president of Kent and of the MCC, and as chairman of the ICC - and was made a Lord. Sir Garry Sobers spoke for many when he said at his memorial service, "Colin Cowdrey was a great man."

Over And Out

Albert Trott: The Man Who Cleared the Lord's Pavilion

Author: Steve Neal

Publisher: Pitch Publishing

ISBN: 1785312871

Category: Sports & Recreation

Page: 224

View: 2089

Over and Out is the remarkable story of a neglected cricket hero. Albert Trott was good enough to play for Australia and England, but at the height of his powers no Test team would pick him. He brought an Ashes series to life by taking 8-43 on debut and his batting average for Australia was 102.5. This was the man who cleared the Lord's pavilion with the biggest of hits. Over and Out celebrates his exploits on the field, which for far too long have been hidden by the taboo of suicide. It also addresses the mystery of Albert Trott, how he responded to the external forces that fashioned his life and ultimately why he did what he did. From fame to broke and broken, from Melbourne to Middlesex his story is compelling. While lesser men have found their place within the cricketing pantheon, it has been the fate of 'Dear Trotty' to be excluded, the permanent outsider. There is no portrait of Albert Trott in the Long Room in the Lord's pavilion. It is time for him to take up his rightful place in the history of the game.

Mystery Spinner

The Life and Death of an Extraordinary Cricketer

Author: Gideon Haigh

Publisher: Aurum Press Limited

ISBN: 1845138414

Category: Sports & Recreation

Page: 376

View: 947

DIV It is no mystery that today the name of Jack Iverson is virtually unknown. For most of his life he was an unexceptional estate agent in Australia. He died in obscurity, by his own hand, at the age of only 58. He was a clumsy fielder, and a hopeless batsman. But for four years he was the best spin bowler in the world. The story of Jack Iverson is one of the most remarkable in the history of cricket. ‘Every now and then,’ wrote one journalist, ‘there comes a man who can do the right thing the wrong way round.’ Iverson took up cricket, at the advanced age of 31, as capriciously as he left it – joining a club 3rd XI in Melbourne one day, and instantly announcing himself as the most prodigious and improbable spinner of a cricket ball. Using a unique technique he appears to have perfects with a ping-pong ball during wartime service in Papua New Guinea, he doubled back his middle finger and found he could bowl leg breaks, top spinners and googlies, every one dropped on a perfect length and impossible to pick. Within four years he was bowling the Australian Test side to victory over England in the Ashes series of 1950-51. Then, in his moment of triumph, he retired from international cricket, and was never the same bowler again. Mystery Spinner is more than that beautifully written life of an elusive and forgotten hero who, after his brief burst of celebrity, has left strangely little trace in posterity. It is also the utterly compelling story of Gideon Haigh’s quest to solve the enduring riddle of Jack Iverson’s life – a quest which led him across Australia following tenuous clues in school registers and county records. And above all it is a moving study, for an age that presumes sporting prowess to be the ultimate definition of personal identity, of how skill is only half the battle in sport, and how it takes an extraordinary individual to cope successfully with extraordinary achievement. /div

The Trundlers

Author: Harry Pearson

Publisher: N.A

ISBN: 9781408704066

Category: Cricket

Page: 256

View: 1140

Some men are born medium-paced, some achieve medium-pace others have medium-pace thrust upon them. Bowlers who take wickets not with pace or spin, but - at speeds between 65 and 85mph - by nagging accuracy are the commonest in cricket. So far, however, nobody has paid them any attention. Yet seam bowling remains one of cricket's most mysterious arts. George Hirst, one of the best early exponents of swerve, was as puzzled by it as his opponents. 'Sometimes it works,' he said, 'and sometimes in doesn't.' Examining the history of medium-pace bowling, explaining how swing both normal and reverse actually works, and telling the story of some of the great and not-so-great dobbers such as Shackleton ('His bowling, like his hair, never less than immaculate,' noted Wisden approvingly), Trundlers will bring bread-and-butter bowlers who 'do a bit off the seam', 'wobble the odd one about' or simply 'nag away at off-stump' out into the limelight for the first time. Warm, affectionate and told with Harry Pearson's trademark humour, Trundlers celebrates dobbers in all their sleeves-rolled-up, uncomplaining workaday glory.

Fedegraphica

A Graphic Biography of the Genius of Roger Federer

Author: Mark Hodgkinson

Publisher: Aurum Press

ISBN: 1781318387

Category: Biography & Autobiography

Page: 272

View: 6680

Universally recognised as the greatest tennis player of all time, and maybe even the greatest athlete, Roger Federer is one of sport's most iconic and popular figures and is adored by millions around the world. In this graphic biography like no other, his genius and astonishing records — no man has won more majors, or spent more weeks as the world number one — are explored and celebrated with beautiful infographics analysing his serving patterns, the speed of his shots, the spin he generates, his movement, as well as his performance in high-pressure situations such as tiebreaks and Grand Slam finals. Drawing on interviews with Federer and those close to him, this is the story of how a young hothead from Basel transformed himself into a calm and poised athlete who came to dominate tennis. And who, while deep in his thirties, has continued to seek improvements, to challenge men many years younger than him and to contend for the sport's biggest prizes. The sheer brilliance of Roger Federer is revealed through illuminating infographics of his game alongside stunning photography, stories and analysis from those who have played, watched and admired him that will give you a new appreciation of his greatness and how his tennis has moved so many people.

The War of the White Roses

Yorkshire Cricket's Civil War, 1968-1986

Author: Stuart Rayner

Publisher: Pitch Publishing

ISBN: 1785311751

Category: Sports & Recreation

Page: 320

View: 5675

In 1968 Yorkshire County Cricket Club was the dominant force in English cricket, yet by 1986 it had slid to become one of the game's also-rans. The War of the White Roses tells the story in full from a completely neutral perspective for the first time. With insight from inside the dressing room, committee room, and from the terraces, it tells how two decades of fierce infighting caused so much damage it took almost 30 years to recapture those past glories. The period from 1968 to 1986 was scarred by bitterness, pettiness and jealousy as civil war broke out with one of the county's greatest-ever players, the brilliant but divisive Geoffrey Boycott, at the centre of the story. He is just one of the many interviewees to contribute from both sides of the divide, looking at the personal feuds and political machinations of the period, and examining just how they contributed to the team's fall from grace.

The Cricket War

The Story of Kerry Packer's World Series Cricket

Author: Gideon Haigh

Publisher: Bloomsbury Publishing

ISBN: 147295064X

Category: Sports & Recreation

Page: 368

View: 6231

One of The Times' 50 Greatest Sports Books In May 1977, the cricket world awoke to discover that a thirty-nine-year-old Sydney Businessman called Kerry Packer had signed thirty-five elite international players for his own televised 'World Series'. The Cricket War is the definitive account of the split that changed the game on the field and on the screen. In helmets, under lights, with white balls, and in coloured clothes, the outlaw armies of Ian Chappell, Tony Greig and Clive Lloyd fought a daily battle of survival. In boardrooms and courtrooms Packer and cricket's rulers fought a bitter war of nerves. A compelling account of the top-class sporting life, The Cricket War also gives a unique insight into the motives and methods of the man who became Australia's richest, and remained so, until the day he died. It was the end of cricket as we knew it – and the beginning of cricket as we know it. Gideon Haigh has published over thirty books, over twenty of them about cricket. This edition of The Cricket War, Gideon Haigh's first book about cricket originally published in 1993, has been updated with new photographs and a new introduction by the author.

The Far Corner

A Mazy Dribble Through North-East Football

Author: Harry Pearson

Publisher: Abacus

ISBN: 034913975X

Category: Travel

Page: 256

View: 3978

A book in which Wilf Mannion rubs shoulders with The Sunderland Skinhead: recollections of Len Shakleton blight the lives of village shoppers: and the appointment of Kevin Keegan as manager of Newcastle is celebrated by a man in a leather stetson, crooning 'For The Good Times' to the accompaniment of a midi organ, THE FAR CORNER is a tale of heroism and human frailty, passion and the perils of eating an egg mayonnaise stottie without staining your trousers.

As the Willow Vanishes

Author: Richard Young

Publisher: N.A

ISBN: 9781495256400

Category: Sports & Recreation

Page: 230

View: 2276

Reader, you are in for a treat. Or possibly a shock. Richard 'Siggy' Young has just written an astonishing cricket book about football. Or perhaps it's a stunning football book about cricket. There was much more to the birth and subsequent explosive rise of football in Scotland than mere football. There was cricket. Scottish cricket, Big Scottish cricket. This is serious revisionist history. Cherished myths are debunked. ...a must-read for all with even a passing interest in the origins of Scottish 'fitba' and the social dynamics of nineteenth century industrial Scotland. One thing's for sure. Make no mistake. It's an utter gem.

42 Faith

The Rest of the Jackie Robinson Story

Author: Ed Henry

Publisher: Thomas Nelson

ISBN: 0718089057

Category: Biography & Autobiography

Page: 240

View: 1606

Jackie Robinson, Branch Rickey, and the hidden hand of God that changed history Journalist and baseball lover Ed Henry reveals for the first time the backstory of faith that guided Jackie Robinson into not only the baseball record books but the annals of civil rights advancement as well. Through recently discovered sermons, interviews with Robinson’s family and friends, and even an unpublished book by the player himself, Henry details a side of Jackie’s humanity that few have taken the time to see. Branch Rickey, the famed owner who risked it all by signing Jackie to his first contract, is also shown as a complex individual who wanted nothing more than to make his God-fearing mother proud of him. Few know the level at which Rickey struggled with his decision, only moving forward after a private meeting with a minister he’d just met. It turns out Rickey was not as certain about signing Robinson as historians have always assumed. With many baseball stories to enthrall even the most ardent enthusiast, 42 Faith also digs deep into why Jackie was the man he was and what both drove him and challenged him after his retirement. From his early years before baseball, to his time with Rickey and the Dodgers, to his failing health in his final years, we see a man of faith that few have recognized. This book will add a whole new dimension to Robinson’s already awe-inspiring legacy. Yes, Jackie and Branch are both still heroes long after their deaths. Now, we learn more fully than ever before, there was an assist from God too.

A Catholic Introduction to the Bible: The Old Testament

Author: John Bergsma,Brant Pitre

Publisher: Ignatius Press

ISBN: 1642290483

Category: Religion

Page: 1060

View: 587

Although many Catholics are familiar with the four Gospels and other writings of the New Testament, for most, reading the Old Testament is like walking into a foreign land. Who wrote these forty-six books? When were they written? Why were they written? What are we to make of their laws, stories, histories, and prophecies? Should the Old Testament be read by itself or in light of the New Testament?

John Bergsma and Brant Pitre offer readable in-depth answers to these questions as they introduce each book of the Old Testament. They not only examine the literature from a historical and cultural perspective but also interpret it theologically, drawing on the New Testament and the faith of the Catholic Church. Unique among introductions, this volume places the Old Testament in its liturgical context, showing how its passages are employed in the current Lectionary used at Mass.

Accessible to nonexperts, this thorough and up-to-date introduction to the Old Testament can serve as an idea textbook for biblical studies. Its unique approach, along with its maps, illustrations, and other reference materials, makes it a valuable resource for seminarians, priests, Scripture scholars, theologians, and catechists, as well as anyone seeking a deeper understanding of the Bible.

Stroke of Genius

Author: Gideon Haigh

Publisher: Penguin UK

ISBN: 1743770413

Category: Biography & Autobiography

Page: 240

View: 2694

Today Victor Trumper is, literally, a legend - revered for deeds lost in time, a hallowed name from the golden era from before the moving image began to dictate memories and Bradman reset the records. In life, Trumper was Australia's first world beater - at his peak just after Federation, he was not just a cricketer but an artist of the bat, the genius of a new era, a symbol of what Australia could be. Crowds flocked to his club matches, English supporters cheered him on in Tests, and at his early funeral in 1915 - even amidst the grief of war - mourners choked the streets of Sydney. Trumper lives on, not just as the name of a stand at the SCG, or a park near his former home ground. He lives in an image that captures him mid-stroke: a daring player's graceful advance into the unknown, alive with intent and controlled abandon. Reproduced countless times in cricket books and pavilions around the world, it conjures an era, an attitude - cricket's first imaginings of itself - and encapsulates the timeless beauty of sport like none other. If Trumper is a legend, George Beldam's 'Jumping Out' has become an icon. But that image has almost paradoxically obscured the story of its subject. Man and photograph have entranced Gideon Haigh since childhood, and in Stroke of Genius he explores both the real Victor Trumper and the process of his iconography. Together they inspired a profound moral and aesthetic revaluation of the game, and changed the way we think about cricket, art and Australia. In this inventive, fresh and compelling work of history, Haigh reveals how Trumper, and Beldam's incarnation of his brilliance, are at the intersection of sport and art, history and timelessness, reality and myth.

Don Kenyon

His Own Man

Author: Tim Jones

Publisher: Amberley Publishing Limited

ISBN: 1445647575

Category: Biography & Autobiography

Page: 160

View: 5429

Telling the life of Worcestershire CCC's most influential captain through fascinating pictures.

Britishness Abroad

Transnational Movements and Imperial Cultures

Author: N.A

Publisher: Academic Monographs

ISBN: 0522853927

Category: British

Page: 302

View: 743

As a global phenomenon Britishness encompassed trade, conquest and settlement and the development of imperial cultures within the vast reaches of the British Empire. At its zenith peoples around the world joined in shared traditions and common loyalties that were strenuously maintained; even those who contested its claims found it difficult to escape its effects. With the eclipse of British power and influence, the importance of this legacy has attracted increasing attention from researchers seeking to escape the confines of national histories. Britishness Abroad explores the cultural, economic and political aspects of Britishness in Australia, New Zealand, New Guinea, Canada and South Africa, as well as in the United States and within Britain itself. Leading scholars consider the movement of people, money, technology, identities, beliefs and attitudes around the British world and examine what happened to Britishness as the Empire declined. Contributors: Stephen Banfield, Kate Darian-Smith, Anne Dickson-Waiko, Patricia Grimshaw, David Goodman, Jonathan Hyslop, John MacKenzie, Gary Magee and Andrew Thompson, Adele Perry, Bill Schwarz, Stuart Ward

Field of Shadows

Author: Dan Waddell

Publisher: Bantam Press

ISBN: 9780593072615

Category: Cricket

Page: 272

View: 6285

Adolf Hitler despised cricket, considering it un-German and decadent. And Berlin in 1937 was not a time to be going against the Fuhrerâe(tm)s wishes. But hot on the heels of the 1936 Olympics, an enterprising cricket fanatic of enormous bravery, Felix Menzel, somehow persuaded his Nazi leaders to invite an English team to play his motley band of part-timers. That team was the Gentlemen of Worcestershire, an ill-matched group of mavericks, minor nobility, ex-county cricketers, rich businessmen and callow schoolboys âe" led by former Worcestershire CC skipper Major Maurice Jewell. Ordered âe~not to loseâe(tm) by the MCC, Jewell and his men entered the 'Garden of Beasts' to play two unofficial Test matches against Germany. Against a backdrop of repression, brutality and sporadic gunfire, the Gents battled searing August heat, matting pitches, the skill and cunning of Menzel, and opponents who didn't always adhere to the laws and spirit of the game. The tour culminated in a match at the very stadium which a year before had witnessed one of sport's greatest spectacles and a sinister public display of Nazi might. Despite the shadow cast by the cataclysmic conflict that was shortly to engulf them, Dan Waddell's vivid and detailed account of the Gentlemen of Worcestershire's 1937 Berlin tour is a story of triumph: of civility over barbarity, of passion over indifference and hope over despair.

Amazing Grace

The Man Who was W.G.

Author: Richard Tomlinson

Publisher: Hachette UK

ISBN: 1408705184

Category: Biography & Autobiography

Page: 432

View: 6103

On a sunny afternoon in May 1868, nineteen-year-old Gilbert Grace stood in a Wiltshire field, wondering why he was playing cricket against the Great Western Railway Club. A batting genius, 'W. G.' should have been starring at Lord's in the grand opening match of the season. But MCC did not want to elect this humble son of a provincial doctor. W. G's career was faltering before it had barely begun. Grace finally forced his way into MCC and over the next three decades, millions came to watch him - not just at Lord's, but across the British Empire and beyond. Only W. G. could boast a fan base that stretched from an American Civil War general and the Prince of Wales's mistress to the children who fingered his coat-tails as he walked down the street, just to say 'I touched him'. The public never knew the darker story behind W. G.'s triumphal progress. Accused of avarice, W. G. was married to the daughter of a bankrupt. Disparaged as a simpleton, his subversive mind recast how to play sport - thrillingly hard, pushing the rules, beating his opponents his own way. In Amazing Grace, Richard Tomlinson unearths a life lived so far ahead of his times that W. G. is still misunderstood today. For the first time, Tomlinson delves into long-buried archives in England and Australia to reveal the real W. G: a self-made, self-destructive genius, at odds with the world and himself.

An Empire Divided

The American Revolution and the British Caribbean

Author: Andrew Jackson O'Shaughnessy

Publisher: University of Pennsylvania Press

ISBN: 0812293398

Category: History

Page: 376

View: 7347

There were 26—not 13—British colonies in America in 1776. Of these, the six colonies in the Caribbean—Jamaica, Barbados, the Leeward Islands, Grenada and Tobago, St. Vincent; and Dominica—were among the wealthiest. These island colonies were closely related to the mainland by social ties and tightly connected by trade. In a period when most British colonists in North America lived less than 200 miles inland and the major cities were all situated along the coast, the ocean often acted as a highway between islands and mainland rather than a barrier. The plantation system of the islands was so similar to that of the southern mainland colonies that these regions had more in common with each other, some historians argue, than either had with New England. Political developments in all the colonies moved along parallel tracks, with elected assemblies in the Caribbean, like their mainland counterparts, seeking to increase their authority at the expense of colonial executives. Yet when revolution came, the majority of the white island colonists did not side with their compatriots on the mainland. A major contribution to the history of the American Revolution, An Empire Divided traces a split in the politics of the mainland and island colonies after the Stamp Act Crisis of 1765-66, when the colonists on the islands chose not to emulate the resistance of the patriots on the mainland. Once war came, it was increasingly unpopular in the British Caribbean; nonetheless, the white colonists cooperated with the British in defense of their islands. O'Shaughnessy decisively refutes the widespread belief that there was broad backing among the Caribbean colonists for the American Revolution and deftly reconstructs the history of how the island colonies followed an increasingly divergent course from the former colonies to the north.

Arthur Carr

The Rise and Fall of Nottinghamshire's Bodyline Captain

Author: Peter Wynne-Thomas

Publisher: Chequered Flag Publishing

ISBN: 9780993215292

Category: Cricket players

Page: 304

View: 9540

When Arthur Carr played his last first-class cricket match in 1934, it was the end of an impressive career which saw him play for Nottinghamshire for 25 years, lead England as captain and score 45 centuries. Yet Carr graced Trent Bridge little in the years after his retirement. The reason? He was tainted by Bodyline - it was Carr who pioneered Bodyline bowling as the captain of Nottinghamshire and defended its use after the infamous tour of Australia. Winner of the County Championship, soldier in the Great War, Wisden Cricketer of the Year, inspiration for novelist Alec Waugh - Carr was far more than the instigator of a bowling tactic. Based on years of research, Peter Wynne-Thomas is bringing this forgotten captain - who could be both inspiring and alienating - back into the spotlight.

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