Search Results: development-of-american-journalistic-work-in-the-eighteenth-and-nineteenth-centuries

Development of American Journalistic Work in the Eighteenth and Nineteenth Centuries

Journalists, Politicians, Political Communication, and Occupational Boundaries

Author: Patricia L. Dooley

Publisher: N.A

ISBN: N.A

Category:

Page: N.A

View: 5494

Literary Journalism in the United States of America and Slovenia

Author: Sonja Merljak Zdovc

Publisher: University Press of America

ISBN: 9780761841562

Category: Language Arts & Disciplines

Page: 145

View: 8234

Slovenia is acquiring some literary journalism written by Slovene journalists and writers. Author Sonja Merljak Zdovc suggests that more Slovene writers should prefer literary journalism because nonfiction is based on truth, facts, and data and appeals more to readers interested in real world stories. The honest, precise, profound, and sophisticated voice of literary journalism is becoming increasingly good for newspaper circulation, as it reaches not just the mind but also the heart of the reader. Thus, the world of Slovene journalism should also take a turn towards the stylized literary journalism seen in the United States. There, journalists and writers realize that through literary journalism they could perhaps end a general decline of traditional print media by restoring to readers stories that uncover the universal struggle of the human condition.

Encyclopedia of Journalism

Author: Christopher H. Sterling

Publisher: SAGE Publications

ISBN: 1452261520

Category: Language Arts & Disciplines

Page: 3136

View: 9484

"Written in a clear and accessible style that would suit the needs of journalists and scholars alike, this encyclopedia is highly recommended for large news organizations and all schools of journalism." —Starred Review, Library Journal Journalism permeates our lives and shapes our thoughts in ways we've long taken for granted. Whether we listen to National Public Radio in the morning, view the lead story on the Today show, read the morning newspaper headlines, stay up-to-the-minute with Internet news, browse grocery store tabloids, receive Time magazine in our mailbox, or watch the nightly news on television, journalism pervades our daily activities. The six-volume Encyclopedia of Journalism covers all significant dimensions of journalism, including print, broadcast, and Internet journalism; U.S. and international perspectives; history; technology; legal issues and court cases; ownership; and economics. The set contains more than 350 signed entries under the direction of leading journalism scholar Christopher H. Sterling of The George Washington University. In the A-to-Z volumes 1 through 4, both scholars and journalists contribute articles that span the field's wide spectrum of topics, from design, editing, advertising, and marketing to libel, censorship, First Amendment rights, and bias to digital manipulation, media hoaxes, political cartoonists, and secrecy and leaks. Also covered are recently emerging media such as podcasting, blogs, and chat rooms. The last two volumes contain a thorough listing of journalism awards and prizes, a lengthy section on journalism freedom around the world, an annotated bibliography, and key documents. The latter, edited by Glenn Lewis of CUNY Graduate School of Journalism and York College/CUNY, comprises dozens of primary documents involving codes of ethics, media and the law, and future changes in store for journalism education. Key Themes Consumers and Audiences Criticism and Education Economics Ethnic and Minority Journalism Issues and Controversies Journalist Organizations Journalists Law and Policy Magazine Types Motion Pictures Networks News Agencies and Services News Categories News Media: U.S. News Media: World Newspaper Types News Program Types Online Journalism Political Communications Processes and Routines of Journalism Radio and Television Technology

Tom Wolfe

Author: Harold Bloom

Publisher: Infobase Publishing

ISBN: 143811351X

Category:

Page: 211

View: 9129

Presents a collection of critical essays about the works of Tom Wolfe.

The Conservative Press in Eighteenth-and Nineteenth-century America

Author: Ronald Lora,William Henry Longton

Publisher: Greenwood Publishing Group

ISBN: 9780313310430

Category: History

Page: 401

View: 5989

Selecting journals that speak for a very large number of topics addressed by the conservative press, this volume profiles selected conservative journals published since 1787. The conservative press has scarcely spoken with a single voice, whether the topics treated or even the time inhabited are the same or different. Yet, these journals testify to the persistent vigor and importance of conservatism. Together they provide a focused survey of the history of American conservative thought from the late 18th Century to the late 19th Century. Along with the companion volume covering the 20th Century conservative press, the book provides an important resource on conservative thought in America. Despite the disparities in conservative intellectual thought, the journals covered, even the more idiosyncratic and extreme, are connected by their core values of conservatism. The book is organized into sections reflecting these connections. The first section covers journals associated with Federal, Whig, or, in the Civil War era, Northern Democratic political interests. A later section includes journals sharing an attachment to Southern conservative values during the antebellum and Reconstruction periods. Two sections deal, respectively, with 19th Century Orthodox Protestant periodicals and 19th Century Catholic and Episcopal journals, and yet another section discusses journals united by a major focus on literary topics and cultural connections.

Just the Facts

How "Objectivity" Came to Define American Journalism

Author: David T.Z. Mindich

Publisher: NYU Press

ISBN: 0814764150

Category: Language Arts & Disciplines

Page: 200

View: 9440

If American journalism were a religion, as it has been called, then its supreme deity would be "objectivity." The high priests of the profession worship the concept, while the iconoclasts of advocacy journalism, new journalism, and cyberjournalism consider objectivity a golden calf. Meanwhile, a groundswell of tabloids and talk shows and the increasing infringement of market concerns make a renewed discussion of the validity, possibility, and aim of objectivity a crucial pursuit. Despite its position as the orbital sun of journalistic ethics, objectivity—until now—has had no historian. David T. Z. Mindich reaches back to the nineteenth century to recover the lost history and meaning of this central tenet of American journalism. His book draws on high profile cases, showing the degree to which journalism and its evolving commitment to objectivity altered–and in some cases limited—the public's understanding of events and issues. Mindich devotes each chapter to a particular component of this ethic–detachment, nonpartisanship, the inverted pyramid style, facticity, and balance. Through this combination of history and cultural criticism, Mindich provides a profound meditation on the structure, promise, and limits of objectivity in the age of cybermedia.

The Encyclopedia of the Novel

Author: N.A

Publisher: John Wiley & Sons

ISBN: 111877907X

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 1024

View: 4779

Now available in a single volume paperback, this advanced reference resource for the novel and novel theory offers authoritative accounts of the history, terminology, and genre of the novel, in over 140 articles of 500-7,000 words. Entries explore the history and tradition of the novel in different areas of the world; formal elements of the novel (story, plot, character, narrator); technical aspects of the genre (such as realism, narrative structure and style); subgenres, including the bildungsroman and the graphic novel; theoretical problems, such as definitions of the novel; book history; and the novel's relationship to other arts and disciplines. The Encyclopedia is arranged in A-Z format and features entries from an international cast of over 140 scholars, overseen by an advisory board of 37 leading specialists in the field, making this the most authoritative reference resource available on the novel. This essential reference, now available in an easy-to-use, fully indexed single volume paperback, will be a vital addition to the libraries of literature students and scholars everywhere.

Between the Novel and the News

The Emergence of American Women's Writing

Author: Sari Edelstein

Publisher: University of Virginia Press

ISBN: 0813935911

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 240

View: 1595

While American literary history has long acknowledged the profound influence of journalism on canonical male writers, Sari Edelstein argues that American women writers were also influenced by a dynamic relationship with the mainstream press. From the early republic through the turn of the twentieth century, she offers a comprehensive reassessment of writers such as Catharine Maria Sedgwick, Harriet Jacobs, and Charlotte Perkins Gilman. Drawing on slave narratives, sentimental novels, and realist fiction, Edelstein examines how advances in journalism—including the emergence of the penny press, the rise of the story-paper, and the birth of eyewitness reportage—shaped not only a female literary tradition but also gender conventions themselves. Excluded from formal politics and lacking the vote, women writers were deft analysts of the prevalent tropes and aesthetic gestures of journalism, which they alternately relied upon and resisted in their efforts to influence public opinion and to intervene in political debates. Ultimately, Between the Novel and the News is a project of recovery that transforms our understanding of the genesis and the development of American women’s writing.

The Age of Reform

Author: Richard Hofstadter

Publisher: Vintage

ISBN: 0307809641

Category: Political Science

Page: 352

View: 2570

Winner of the Pulitzer Prize in Non-Fiction. This book is a landmark in American political thought. Preeminent Richard Hofstadter examines the passion for progress and reform that colored the entire period from 1890 to 1940 with startling and stimulating results. The Age of Reform searches out the moral and emotional motives of the reformers the myths and dreams in which they believed, and the realities with which they had to compromise.

The New Encyclopedia of Southern Culture

Volume 23: Folk Art

Author: Carol Crown,Cheryl Rivers,Charles Reagan Wilson

Publisher: UNC Press Books

ISBN: 1469607999

Category: Reference

Page: 520

View: 3817

Folk art is one of the American South's most significant areas of creative achievement, and this comprehensive yet accessible reference details that achievement from the sixteenth century through the present. This volume of The New Encyclopedia of Southern Culture explores the many forms of aesthetic expression that have characterized southern folk art, including the work of self-taught artists, as well as the South's complex relationship to national patterns of folk art collecting. Fifty-two thematic essays examine subjects ranging from colonial portraiture, Moravian material culture, and southern folk pottery to the South's rich quilt-making traditions, memory painting, and African American vernacular art, and 211 topical essays include profiles of major folk and self-taught artists in the region.

The Handbook of Historical Sociolinguistics

Author: Juan Manuel Hernández-Campoy,Juan Camilo Conde-Silvestre

Publisher: John Wiley & Sons

ISBN: 111825726X

Category: Language Arts & Disciplines

Page: 704

View: 2570

Written by an international team of leading scholars, this groundbreaking reference work explores the nature of language change and diffusion, and paves the way for future research in this rapidly expanding interdisciplinary field. Features 35 newly-written essays from internationally acclaimed experts that reflect the growth and vitality of the burgeoning area of historical sociolinguistics Examines how sociolinguistic theoretical models, methods, findings, and expertise can be used to reconstruct a language's past in order to explain linguistic changes and developments Bridges the gap between the past and the present in linguistic studies Structured thematically into sections exploring: origins and theoretical assumptions; methods for the sociolinguistic study of the history of languages; linguistic and extra-linguistic variables; historical dialectology, language contact and diffusion; and attitudes to language

The Routledge International Handbook of the Sociology of Education

Author: Michael W. Apple,Stephen J. Ball,Luis Armando Gandin

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 1135179719

Category: Education

Page: 441

View: 3271

This collection brings together many of the world’s leading sociologists of education to explore and address key issues and concerns within the discipline. The thirty-seven newly commissioned chapters draw upon theory and research to provide new accounts of contemporary educational processes, global trends, and changing and enduring forms of social conflict and social inequality. The research, conducted by leading international scholars in the field, indicates that two complexly interrelated agendas are discernible in the heat and noise of educational change over the past twenty-five years. The first rests on a clear articulation by the state of its requirements of education. The second promotes at least the appearance of greater autonomy on the part of educational institutions in the delivery of those requirements. The Routledge International Handbook of the Sociology of Education examines the ways in which the sociology of education has responded to these two political agendas, addressing a range of issues which cover three key areas: perspectives and theories social processes and practices inequalities and resistances. The book strongly communicates the vibrancy and diversity of the sociology of education and the nature of ‘sociological work’ in this field. It will be a primary resource for teachers, as well as a title of major interest to practising sociologists of education.

Key Readings in Journalism

Author: Elliot King,Jane Chapman

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 113576767X

Category: Language Arts & Disciplines

Page: 424

View: 5867

Key Readings in Journalism brings together over thirty essential writings that every student of journalism should know. Designed as a primary text for undergraduate students, each reading was carefully chosen in response to extensive surveys from educators reflecting on the needs of today’s journalism classroom. Readings range from critical and historical studies of journalism, such as Walter Lippmann’s Public Opinion and Michael Schudson’s Discovering the News, to examples of classic reporting, such as Carl Bernstein and Bob Woodward’s All the President’s Men. They are supplemented by additional readings to broaden the volume’s scope in every dimension, including gender, race, and nationality. The volume is arranged thematically to enable students to think deeply and broadly about journalism—its development, its practice, its key individuals and institutions, its social impact, and its future—and section introductions and headnotes precede each reading to provide context and key points for discussion.

The Oxford Handbook of Modern Irish History

Author: Alvin Jackson

Publisher: OUP Oxford

ISBN: 0191667609

Category: History

Page: 640

View: 7878

The study of Irish history, once riven and constricted, has recently enjoyed a resurgence, with new practitioners, new approaches, and new methods of investigation. The Oxford Handbook of Modern Irish History represents the diversity of this emerging talent and achievement by bringing together 36 leading scholars of modern Ireland and embracing 400 years of Irish history, uniting early and late modernists as well as contemporary historians. The Handbook offers a set of scholarly perspectives drawn from numerous disciplines, including history, political science, literature, geography, and the Irish language. It looks at the Irish at home as well as in their migrant and diasporic communities. The Handbook combines sets of wide thematic and interpretative essays, with more detailed investigations of particular periods. Each of the contributors offers a summation of the state of scholarship within their subject area, linking their own research insights with assessments of future directions within the discipline. In its breadth and depth and diversity, The Oxford Handbook of Modern Irish History offers an authoritative and vibrant portrayal of the history of modern Ireland.

Encyclopedia of American Journalism

Author: Stephen L. Vaughn

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 1135880190

Category: Language Arts & Disciplines

Page: 664

View: 3848

The Encyclopedia of American Journalism explores the distinctions found in print media, radio, television, and the internet. This work seeks to document the role of these different forms of journalism in the formation of America's understanding and reaction to political campaigns, war, peace, protest, slavery, consumer rights, civil rights, immigration, unionism, feminism, environmentalism, globalization, and more. This work also explores the intersections between journalism and other phenomena in American Society, such as law, crime, business, and consumption. The evolution of journalism's ethical standards is discussed, as well as the important libel and defamation trials that have influenced journalistic practice, its legal protection, and legal responsibilities. Topics covered include: Associations and Organizations; Historical Overview and Practice; Individuals; Journalism in American History; Laws, Acts, and Legislation; Print, Broadcast, Newsgroups, and Corporations; Technologies.

Hirelings

African American Workers and Free Labor in Early Maryland

Author: Jennifer Hull Dorsey

Publisher: Cornell University Press

ISBN: 9780801461156

Category: History

Page: N.A

View: 2404

In Hirelings, Jennifer Dorsey recreates the social and economic milieu of Maryland's Eastern Shore at a time when black slavery and black freedom existed side by side. She follows a generation of manumitted African Americans and their freeborn children and grandchildren through the process of inventing new identities, associations, and communities in the early nineteenth century. Free Africans and their descendants had lived in Maryland since the seventeenth century, but before the American Revolution they were always few in number and lacking in economic resources or political leverage. By contrast, manumitted and freeborn African Americans in the early republic refashioned the Eastern Shore's economy and society, earning their livings as wage laborers while establishing thriving African American communities. As free workers in a slave society, these African Americans contested the legitimacy of the slave system even while they remained dependent laborers. They limited white planters' authority over their time and labor by reuniting their families in autonomous households, settling into free black neighborhoods, negotiating labor contracts that suited the needs of their households, and worshipping in the African Methodist Episcopal Church. Some moved to the cities, but many others migrated between employers as a strategy for meeting their needs and thwarting employers' control. They demonstrated that independent and free African American communities could thrive on their own terms. In all of these actions the free black workers of the Eastern Shore played a pivotal role in ongoing debates about the merits of a free labor system.

Homespun Gospel

The Triumph of Sentimentality in Contemporary American Evangelicalism

Author: Todd M. Brenneman

Publisher: Oxford University Press

ISBN: 0199989001

Category: Religion

Page: 240

View: 8011

In popular evangelical literature, God is loving and friendly, described in heartfelt, often saccharine language that evokes nostalgia, comfortable domesticity, and familial love. This emotional style has been widely adopted by the writers most popular among American evangelicals, including such celebrity pastors as Max Lucado, Rick Warren, and Joel Osteen. Todd M. Brenneman provides groundbreaking insight into the phenomenon of evangelical sentimentality: an emotional appeal to readers' feelings about familial relationships, which can in turn be used as the basis for a relationship with God. Brenneman shows how evangelicals use tropes of God as father, human beings as children, and nostalgia for an imagined idyllic home life to provide alternate sources of social authority, intended to help evangelicals survive a culture that is philosophically at odds with conservative Christianity. Yet Brenneman also demonstrates that the sentimental focus on individual emotion and experience can undermine the evangelical agenda. Sentimentality is an effective means of achieving individual conversions, but it also promotes a narcissism that blinds evangelicals to larger social forces and impedes their ability to bring about the change they seek. Homespun Gospel offers a compelling perspective on an unexplored but vital aspect of American evangelical identity.

Macbeth

Author: Nicolas Tredell

Publisher: Macmillan International Higher Education

ISBN: 0230203086

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 192

View: 9364

Macbeth is the most concentrated and intense of Shakespeare's tragedies. This dark, thrilling drama of intrigue, witchcraft and murder can be seen as a profound exploration of evil, a powerful study of psychological turmoil, a penetrating examination of urgent political issues and a searching enquiry into masculinity and femininity. Over four centuries, the play has attracted a huge body of commentary, generated a wide range of fascinating interpretations and provoked vigorous controversy. In this Reader's Guide, Nicolas Tredell considers the key critical responses to Macbeth from the early seventeenth to the twenty-first century. He provides concise accounts and assessments of the most vital commentaries and interpretations, setting them in their critical, theoretical and historical contexts. Lively and authoritative, this survey is an invaluable resource for students, teachers and all those who wish to deepen their grasp of the crucial concerns of Macbeth criticism and to engage in the ongoing critical debates about the play.

Changing Journalism

Author: Peter Lee-Wright,Angela Phillips,Tamara Witschge

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 1136672702

Category: Performing Arts

Page: 192

View: 3111

Journalism is in transition. Irrevocable decisions are being made, often based on flimsy evidence, which could change not only the future of journalism, but also the future of democracy. This book, based on extensive research, provides the opportunity to reflect upon these decisions and considers how journalism could change for the better and for the good of democracy. It covers: the business landscape work and employment the regulatory framework audiences and interaction the impact of technology on practices and content ethics in a converged world The book analyses research in both national and local journalism, broadcast, newspaper and online journalism, broadsheet and tabloid, drawing comparisons between the different outlets in the field of news journalism, making this essential reading for scholars and students of journalism and media studies.

Theorising the Ibero-American Atlantic

Author: N.A

Publisher: BRILL

ISBN: 900425806X

Category: History

Page: 320

View: 3965

Theorising the Ibero-American Atlantic offers fresh and challenging perspectives on the Atlantic turn in Hispanic and Latin American studies. Contributors, while mindful of its limits, explore and establish the viability and value of the Ibero-American Atlantic as a framework of enquiry.

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