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Does Anything Eat Wasps

And 101 Other Questions

Author: New Scientist

Publisher: Hachette UK

ISBN:

Category: Science

Page: 224

View: 714

Every year, readers send in thousands of questions to New Scientist, the world's best-selling science weekly, in the hope that the answers to them will be given in the 'Last Word' column - regularly voted the most popular section of the magazine. Does Anything Eat Wasps? is a collection of the best that have appeared, including: Why can't we eat green potatoes? Why do airliners suddenly plummet? Does a compass work in space? Why do all the local dogs howl at emergency sirens? How can a tree grow out of a chimney stack? Why do bruises go through a range of colours? Why is the sea blue inside caves? Many seemingly simple questions are actually very complex to answer. And some that seem difficult have a very simple explanation. New Scientist's 'Last Word' celebrates all questions - the trivial, the idiosyncratic, the baffling and the strange. This selection of the best is popular science at its most entertaining and enlightening.

Does anything eat wasps?

and 101 other questions : questions and answers from the popular 'Last Word' column

Author: Mick O'Hare

Publisher:

ISBN:

Category: Science

Page: 218

View: 221

Why Don't Penguins' Feet Freeze?

And 114 Other Questions

Author: New Scientist

Publisher: Hachette UK

ISBN:

Category: Science

Page: 236

View: 978

Why Don't Penguins' Feet Freeze? is the latest compilation of readers' answers to the questions in the 'Last Word' column of New Scientist, the world's best-selling science weekly. Following the phenomenal success of Does Anything Eat Wasps? - the Christmas 2005 surprise bestseller - this new collection includes recent answers never before published in book form, and also old favourites from the column's early days. Yet again, many seemingly simple questions turn out to have complex answers. And some that seem difficult have a very simple explanation. New Scientist's 'Last Word' is regularly voted the magazine's most popular section as it celebrates all questions - the trivial, idiosyncratic, baffling and strange. This new selection of the best is popular science at its most entertaining and enlightening.

Does Anything Eat Shit?

And 101 Other Crap Questions and Answers

Author: Sarah Herman

Publisher: Summersdale Publishers LTD - ROW

ISBN:

Category: Humor

Page: 224

View: 847

Does anything eat shit? Have moles always lived in holes? Why are blondes so stupid? How much radiation can a pickled onion withstand? The world is full of really important questions. You will find none of them in this book. What you will find is plenty of nonsense, lots of lies and just enough truth to make you double check the 'facts' with a reliable source. Following the huge success of the New Scientist books - "Does Anything Eat Wasps?" and "Why Don't Penguins' Feet Freeze?" this is an alternative take on human curiosity. With plenty of detailed answers to as many ridiculous questions, if you've learnt absolutely nothing useful by the time you've finished this book, at least you'll be laughing.

Know It All

132 Head-Scratching Questions About the Science All Around Us

Author: New Scientist

Publisher: The Experiment

ISBN:

Category: Science

Page: 272

View: 581

A joy for science lovers, Know It All is your ticket to a grand meeting of curious minds! New Scientist magazine’s beloved “Last Word” column is a rare forum for “un-Google-able” queries: Readers write in, and readers respond! Know It All collects 132 of the column’s very best Q&As. The often-wacky questions cover physics, chemistry, zoology and beyond: When will Mount Everest cease to be the tallest mountain on the planet?If a thermometer was in space, what would it read?Why do some oranges have seeds, and some not?Many people suffer some kind of back pain. Is it because humans haven’t yet perfected the art of walking upright? And the unpredictable answers showcase the brainpower of New Scientist’s readers, like the anatomist who chimes in about back pain (“Evolution is not in the business of perfecting anything.”) and the vet who responds, “Quadrupeds can get backache too!”

How to Fossilise Your Hamster

And Other Amazing Experiments for the Armchair Scientist

Author: Mick O'Hare

Publisher: Profile Books

ISBN:

Category: Science

Page: 215

View: 634

Mick O'Hare and the New Scientist team try to answer scientific conundrums that can be answered by simple experiments.

The Science of Chocolate

Author: S. T. Beckett

Publisher: Royal Society of Chemistry

ISBN:

Category: Technology & Engineering

Page: 240

View: 591

This book takes the reader on the journey of chocolate, to discover how confectionery is made and will appeal to those with a fascination for chocolate.

How to Fossilize Your Hamster

And Other Amazing Experiments for the Armchair Scientist

Author: Mick O'Hare

Publisher: Macmillan

ISBN:

Category: Juvenile Nonfiction

Page: 240

View: 798

A collection of one hundred experiments demonstrates essential scientific principles in action, in tests that range from the chemical reaction between cola and Mentos, to creating clouds in a plastic bottle, and to preserving the family pet for all eterni

Why Don't Penguins' Feet Freeze

And 114 Other Questions

Author: Scientist New

Publisher: Penguin Canada

ISBN:

Category: Science

Page: 240

View: 798

- What time is it at the North Pole? - What’s the chemical formula for a human being? - Why is snot green? - Should you pickle your conkers? - Why do boomerangs come back? The New Scientist magazine’s ever-popular "Last Word" column produces an endlessly fascinating array of questions and answers from its readers. For all those who relish its mixture of wit, insight and scientific curiosity—not to mention those who have read and enjoyed Does Anything Eat Wasps?, the brilliantly successful previous collection—this new volume will be irresistible. Why Don’t Penguins’ Feet Freeze? includes recent answers never before published in book form, as well as old favourites from the column’s early days. This bumper collection brings together the highlights of the ‘Last Word’ in another wise, weird and wacky compendium that is guaranteed to amaze, inform and delight.

How to Make a Tornado

The strange and wonderful things that happen when scientists break free

Author: New Scientist

Publisher: Profile Books

ISBN:

Category: Science

Page: 257

View: 970

Science tells us grand things about the universe: how fast light travels, and why stones fall to earth. But scientific endeavour goes far beyond these obvious foundations. There are some fields we don't often hear about because they are so specialised, or turn out to be dead ends. Yet researchers have given hallucinogenic drugs to blind people (seriously), tried to weigh the soul as it departs the body and planned to blast a new Panama Canal with atomic weapons. Real scientific breakthroughs sometimes come out of the most surprising and unpromising work. How to Make a Tornado is about the margins of science - not the research down tried-and-tested routes, but some of its zanier and more brilliant by-ways. Investigating everything from what it's like to die, to exploding trousers and recycled urine, this book is a reminder that science is intensely creative and often very amusing - and when their minds run free, scientists can fire the imagination like nobody else.

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