Search Results: early-american-almanac-humor

Early American Almanac Humor

Author: Robert K. Dodge

Publisher: Popular Press

ISBN: 9780879723934

Category: Humor

Page: 172

View: 4284

This collection is a selection of comic items from almanacs published between 1776 and 1800. Dodge uses his smooth, astute writing style to unfold the humor in a section of American Heritage. The eight chapters are categorized by subject, including "Comic American Heroes," "The Tall Tale," and "Men, Women, Marriage, and Sex."

So Ole Says to Lena

Folk Humor of the Upper Midwest

Author: James P. Leary

Publisher: Univ of Wisconsin Press

ISBN: 9780299173746

Category: Humor

Page: 258

View: 6233

In the land of beer, cheese, and muskies—where the polka is danced and winter is unending and where Lutherans and Catholics predominate—everybody is ethnic, the politics are clean, and the humor is plentiful. This collection includes jokes, humorous anecdotes, and tall tales from ethnic groups (Woodland Indians, French, Cornish, Germans, Irish, Scandinavians, Finns, and Poles) and working folk (loggers, miners, farmers, townsfolk, hunters, and fishers). Dig into the rich cultural context supplied by the notes and photographs, or just laugh at the hundreds of jokes gathered at small-town cafes, farm tables, job sites, and church suppers. This second edition includes an afterword and indexes of motifs and tale types.

A Mixed Race

Ethnicity in Early America

Author: Frank Shuffelton

Publisher: Oxford University Press

ISBN: 9780195360561

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 296

View: 6644

This collection of new essays enters one of the most topical and energetic debates of our time--the subject of ethnicity. The recent vigorous debates being waged over questions raised by the phenomenon of multiculturalism in America highlight the fact that American culture has arisen out of an unusually rich and interactive ethnic mix. The essays in A Mixed Race suggest that American society was inescapably multicultural from its very beginnings and that this representation of cultural differences fundamentally defined American culture. While recent scholarship has looked extensively at the ethnic formation of modern American culture, this study focuses on the eighteenth century and colonial American values that have been previously overlooked in the debate, arguing that a culture shaped by responses to ethnic and racial difference is not merely a modern circumstance but one at the base of American history. Written by a group of first-class contributors, the essays in this collection discuss the representation of cultural differences between European immigrants and Native Americans, the circumstances of the first African-American autobiographical narratives, rhetorical negotiations among different European-American cultural groups, ethnic representation in the genre literature of jest books and execution narratives, and the ethnic conceptions of Michel de Crevecoeur, Phillis Wheatley, and Thomas Jefferson. A Mixed Race offers agile and original yet scholarly readings of ethnicity and ethnic formation from some of our best critics of early American culture. Moving from questions of race and ethnicity to varieties of ethnic representation, and finally to individual confrontations, this volume sheds light on the confrontations of ethnically diverse peoples, and launches a timely, full-scale investigation of the construction of American culture.

Bodies Politic

Negotiating Race in the American North, 1730-1830

Author: John Wood Sweet

Publisher: JHU Press

ISBN: 9780801873782

Category: History

Page: 486

View: 2984

"Superb... A useful addition to the literature about people of color in [New England]... The major strength of "Bodies Politic" is that it is based on extensive archival research and a wide reading of secondary literature on Africans and Native Americans." -- "History: Reviews of New Books"

Early American Almanacs ; the Colonial Weekday Bible

Author: Marion Barber Stowell

Publisher: Burt Franklin

ISBN: N.A

Category: Almanacs, American

Page: 331

View: 1786

The American Almanac and Repository of Useful Knowledge for the Year ...

Author: Jared Sparks,Francis Bowen,George Partridge Sanger

Publisher: N.A

ISBN: N.A

Category: Almanacs, American

Page: N.A

View: 7446

The American Almanac and Repository of Useful Knowledge for the year 1834

Author: Charles Bowen

Publisher: N.A

ISBN: N.A

Category:

Page: N.A

View: 4538

American Almanac and Repository of Useful Knowledge

Author: N.A

Publisher: N.A

ISBN: N.A

Category: Almanacs, American

Page: N.A

View: 1443

Ayer's American Almanac

For the Use of Farmers, Planters, Mechanics, and All Families

Author: N.A

Publisher: N.A

ISBN: N.A

Category: Almanacs, American

Page: N.A

View: 5352

the american almanac and repository of useful knowledge, for the year 1838.

Author: N.A

Publisher: N.A

ISBN: N.A

Category:

Page: N.A

View: 4628

The Continuum Encyclopedia of American Literature

Author: Steven R. Serafin,Alfred Bendixen

Publisher: A&C Black

ISBN: 9780826417770

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 1305

View: 394

More than ten years in the making, this comprehensive single-volume literary survey is for the student, scholar, and general reader. The Continuum Encyclopedia of American Literature represents a collaborative effort, involving 300 contributors from across the US and Canada. Composed of more than 1,100 signed biographical-critical entries, this Encyclopedia serves as both guide and companion to the study and appreciation of American literature. A special feature is the topical article, of which there are 70.

A Divinity for All Persuasions

Almanacs and Early American Religious Life

Author: T. J. Tomlin

Publisher: Oxford University Press, USA

ISBN: 0199373655

Category: History

Page: 220

View: 8969

The almanac was early America's most affordable and widespread form of print. At its core, it was a calendar and an astrologically-based medical handbook punctuated by poetry, moral axioms, and amusing anecdotes. A Divinity for All Persuasions investigates the religious significance of early America's most ubiquitous popular genre. Other than a Bible and perhaps a few sermons and schoolbooks, an almanac was the only printed item most people owned before 1820 and almanac-makers becameastute arbiters of popular opinion. Catering to consumer demand by drawing on the religious works of their day, early American almanac-makers placed a distilled Protestant vernacular at the center of their publications. By disseminating a recognizable collection of Protestant concepts regarding God's existence, divine revelation, the human condition, and the afterlife, almanacs played an unparalleled role in reinforcing British North America's shared religious culture." Employing a wealthof archival material, T.J. Tomlin analyzes the pan-Protestant sensibility distributed through the almanacs' pages between 1730 and 1820. Influenced by readers' opinions and printers' pragmatism, the religious content of popular print supports a fresh interpretation of early American cultural and religious history. In sharp contrast to a historiography centered on intra-Protestant competition, Tomlin shows that most early Americans relied on a handful of Protestant "essentials" (the Bible, the afterlife, and a recognizably moral life) rather than denominational specifics to define and organize their religious lives. A Divinity for All Persuasions uncovers the prevailing religious sensibility at the center of early America's most popular form of print."

Self-help and Popular Religion in Early American Culture

An Interpretive Guide

Author: Roy M. Anker

Publisher: Greenwood Publishing Group

ISBN: 9780313311369

Category: Religion

Page: 246

View: 9834

Focuses on early America, from the Protestant Ethic and Puritan New England through Revivalism and American Romanticism.

Benjamin Franklin's Humor

Author: Paul M. Zall

Publisher: University Press of Kentucky

ISBN: 0813138175

Category: History

Page: 200

View: 6027

Although he called himself merely a "printer" in his will, Benjamin Franklin could have also called himself a diplomat, a doctor, an electrician, a frontier general, an inventor, a journalist, a legislator, a librarian, a magistrate, a postmaster, a promoter, a publisher -- and a humorist. John Adams wrote of Franklin, "He had wit at will. He had humor that when he pleased was pleasant and delightful... [and] talents for irony, allegory, and fable, that he could adapt with great skill, to the promotion of moral and political truth." In Benjamin Franklin's Humor, author Paul M. Zall shows how one of America's founding fathers used humor to further both personal and national interests. Early in his career, Franklin impersonated the feisty widow Silence Dogood in a series of comically moralistic essays that helped his brother James outpace competitors in Boston's incipient newspaper market. In the mid-eighteenth century, he displayed his talent for comic impersonation in numerous editions of Poor Richard's Almanac, a series of pocket-sized tomes filled with proverbs and witticisms that were later compiled in Franklin's The Way to Wealth (1758), one of America's all-time bestselling books. Benjamin Franklin was sure to be remembered for his early work as an author, printer, and inventor, but his accomplishments as a statesman later in life firmly secured his lofty stature in American history. Zall shows how Franklin employed humor to achieve desired ends during even the most difficult diplomatic situations: while helping draft the Declaration of Independence, while securing France's support for the American Revolution, while brokering the treaty with England to end the War for Independence, and while mediating disputes at the Constitutional Convention. He supervised and facilitated the birth of a nation with customary wit and aplomb. Zall traces the development of an acute sense of humor throughout the life of a great American. Franklin valued humor not as an end in itself but as a means to gain a competitive edge, disseminate information, or promote a program. Early in life, he wrote about timely topics in an effort to reach a mass reading class, leaving an amusing record of early American culture. Later, Franklin directed his talents toward serving his country. Regardless of its origin, the best of Benjamin Franklin's humor transcends its initial purpose and continues to evoke undying laughter at shared human experiences.

American Heroes: Profiles of Men and Women Who Shaped Early America

Author: Edmund S. Morgan

Publisher: W. W. Norton & Company

ISBN: 039330454X

Category: Biography & Autobiography

Page: 304

View: 3032

Reexamines the lives of American heroes such as George Washington and Benjamin Franklin, and reevaluates the legacies of religious figures such as Anne Hutchinson and unknown martyrs such as Mary Easty and Giles Cory, who were executed for practicing witchcraft.

Ayer's American Almanac

Author: Ayer, J.C. & co., Lowell, Mass

Publisher: N.A

ISBN: N.A

Category: Almanacs

Page: N.A

View: 2571

Vols. for 1889- contain the almanac for the United States and also almanacs in various languages for various parts of the world.

The American Almanac, Year-book, Cyclopedia and Atlas

Author: N.A

Publisher: N.A

ISBN: N.A

Category: Yearbooks

Page: N.A

View: 9923

The American Almanac, Year-book, Cyclopaedia and Atlas

Author: N.A

Publisher: N.A

ISBN: N.A

Category: Almanacs, American

Page: N.A

View: 6169

The Eclectic Magazine of Foreign Literature, Science, and Art

Author: N.A

Publisher: N.A

ISBN: N.A

Category: American literature

Page: N.A

View: 6116

The Eclectic Magazine

Author: John Holmes Agnew,Walter Hilliard Bidwell

Publisher: N.A

ISBN: N.A

Category: Periodicals

Page: N.A

View: 4744

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