Search Results: empire-statesman

Empire Statesman

The Rise and Redemption of Al Smith

Author: Robert A. Slayton

Publisher: Simon and Schuster

ISBN: 0684863022

Category: Biography & Autobiography

Page: 480

View: 1957

A portrait of the former New York governor chronicles Smith's struggles in state government and the anti-Catholic sentiments that torpedoed his bid for the presidency in 1928.

The Revolution of ’28

Al Smith, American Progressivism, and the Coming of the New Deal

Author: Robert Chiles

Publisher: Cornell University Press

ISBN: 1501714198

Category: Biography & Autobiography

Page: 298

View: 6386

The Revolution of ’28 explores the career of New York governor and 1928 Democratic presidential nominee Alfred E. Smith. Robert Chiles peers into Smith’s work and uncovers a distinctive strain of American progressivism that resonated among urban, ethnic, working-class Americans in the early twentieth century. The book charts the rise of that idiomatic progressivism during Smith’s early years as a state legislator through his time as governor of the Empire State in the 1920s, before proceeding to a revisionist narrative of the 1928 presidential campaign, exploring the ways in which Smith’s gubernatorial progressivism was presented to a national audience. As Chiles points out, new-stock voters responded enthusiastically to Smith's candidacy on both economic and cultural levels. Chiles offers a historical argument that describes the impact of this coalition on the new liberal formation that was to come with Franklin Delano Roosevelt’s New Deal, demonstrating the broad practical consequences of Smith’s political career. In particular, Chiles notes how Smith’s progressive agenda became Democratic partisan dogma and a rallying point for policy formation and electoral success at the state and national levels. Chiles sets the record straight in The Revolution of ’28 by paying close attention to how Smith identified and activated his emergent coalition and put it to use in his campaign of 1928, before quickly losing control over it after his failed presidential bid.

Skyscraper

The Politics and Power of Building New York City in the Twentieth Century

Author: Benjamin Flowers

Publisher: University of Pennsylvania Press

ISBN: 9780812241846

Category: Architecture

Page: 232

View: 1078

Selected by Choice magazine as an Outstanding Academic Title for 2010 Nowhere in the world is there a greater concentration of significant skyscrapers than in New York City. And though this iconographic American building style has roots in Chicago, New York is where it has grown into such a powerful reflection of American commerce and culture. In Skyscraper: The Politics and Power of Building New York City in the Twentieth Century, Benjamin Flowers explores the role of culture and ideology in shaping the construction of skyscrapers and the way wealth and power have operated to reshape the urban landscape. Flowers narrates this modern tale by closely examining the creation and reception of three significant sites: the Empire State Building, the Seagram Building, and the World Trade Center. He demonstrates how architects and their clients employed a diverse range of modernist styles to engage with and influence broader cultural themes in American society: immigration, the Cold War, and the rise of American global capitalism. Skyscraper explores the various wider meanings associated with this architectural form as well as contemporary reactions to it across the critical spectrum. Employing a broad array of archival sources, such as corporate records, architects' papers, newspaper ads, and political cartoons, Flowers examines the personal, political, cultural, and economic agendas that motivate architects and their clients to build ever higher. He depicts the American saga of commerce, wealth, and power in the twentieth century through their most visible symbol, the skyscraper.

Dry Manhattan

Prohibition in New York City

Author: Michael A. LERNER

Publisher: Harvard University Press

ISBN: 0674040090

Category: History

Page: 360

View: 1685

In 1919, the United States made its boldest attempt at social reform: Prohibition. This "noble experiment" was aggressively promoted, and spectacularly unsuccessful, in New York City. In the first major work on Prohibition in a quarter century, and the only full history of Prohibition in the era's most vibrant city, Lerner describes a battle between competing visions of the United States that encompassed much more than the freedom to drink.

In the Twilight of Empire

Count Alois Lexa Von Aehrenthal (1854-1912) ; Imperial Habsburg Patriot and Statesman

Author: Solomon Wank

Publisher: Böhlau Verlag Wien

ISBN: 9783205783527

Category: Austria

Page: 292

View: 5202

United Empire

Author: N.A

Publisher: N.A

ISBN: N.A

Category:

Page: N.A

View: 3630

Machine Made: Tammany Hall and the Creation of Modern American Politics

Author: Terry Golway

Publisher: W. W. Norton & Company

ISBN: 0871407922

Category: History

Page: 400

View: 7894

“Golway’s revisionist take is a useful reminder of the unmatched ingenuity of American politics.”—Wall Street Journal History casts Tammany Hall as shorthand for the worst of urban politics: graft and patronage personified by notoriously crooked characters. In his groundbreaking work Machine Made, journalist and historian Terry Golway dismantles these stereotypes, focusing on the many benefits of machine politics for marginalized immigrants. As thousands sought refuge from Ireland’s potato famine, the very question of who would be included under the protection of American democracy was at stake. Tammany’s transactional politics were at the heart of crucial social reforms—such as child labor laws, workers’ compensation, and minimum wages— and Golway demonstrates that American political history cannot be understood without Tammany’s profound contribution. Culminating in FDR’s New Deal, Machine Made reveals how Tammany Hall “changed the role of government—for the better to millions of disenfranchised recent American arrivals” (New York Observer).

The Last Three Miles

Politics, Murder, and the Construction of America's First Superhighway

Author: Steven Hart

Publisher: The New Press

ISBN: 1595587489

Category: History

Page: 216

View: 5417

At the dawn of America’s love affair with the automobile, cars and trucks leaving the nation’s largest city were unceremoniously dumped out of the western end of the Holland Tunnel onto local roads wending their way through the New Jersey Meadowlands. Jersey City mayor Frank Hague—dictator of the Hudson County political machine and a national political player—was a prime mover behind the building of the country’s first “superhighway,” designed to connect the hub of New York City to the United States of America. Hague’s nemesis in this undertaking was union boss Teddy Brandle, and construction of the last three miles of Route 25, later dubbed the Pulaski Skyway, marked an epic battle between big labor and big politics, culminating in a murder and the creation of a motorway so flawed it soon became known as “Death Avenue” —now appropriately featured in the opening sequence of the hit HBO series The Sopranos. A book in the tradition of Robert Caro’s The Power Broker and Henry Petroski’s Engineers of Dreams, The Last Three Miles brings to vivid life the riveting and bloodstained back story of a fascinating chapter in the heroic age of public works.

Hollywood Left and Right

How Movie Stars Shaped American Politics

Author: Steven J. Ross

Publisher: Oxford University Press

ISBN: 0199911436

Category: History

Page: 512

View: 9912

In Hollywood Left and Right, Steven J. Ross tells a story that has escaped public attention: the emergence of Hollywood as a vital center of political life and the important role that movie stars have played in shaping the course of American politics. Ever since the film industry relocated to Hollywood early in the twentieth century, it has had an outsized influence on American politics. Through compelling larger-than-life figures in American cinema--Charlie Chaplin, Louis B. Mayer, Edward G. Robinson, George Murphy, Ronald Reagan, Harry Belafonte, Jane Fonda, Charlton Heston, Warren Beatty, and Arnold Schwarzenegger--Hollywood Left and Right reveals how the film industry's engagement in politics has been longer, deeper, and more varied than most people would imagine. As shown in alternating chapters, the Left and the Right each gained ascendancy in Tinseltown at different times. From Chaplin, whose movies almost always displayed his leftist convictions, to Schwarzenegger's nearly seamless transition from action blockbusters to the California governor's mansion, Steven J. Ross traces the intersection of Hollywood and political activism from the early twentieth century to the present. Hollywood Left and Right challenges the commonly held belief that Hollywood has always been a bastion of liberalism. The real story, as Ross shows in this passionate and entertaining work, is far more complicated. First, Hollywood has a longer history of conservatism than liberalism. Second, and most surprising, while the Hollywood Left was usually more vocal and visible, the Right had a greater impact on American political life, capturing a senate seat (Murphy), a governorship (Schwarzenegger), and the ultimate achievement, the Presidency (Reagan).

Abschied vom Empire

die innere Dekolonisation Grossbritanniens 1945 - 1985

Author: Gerhard Altmann

Publisher: Wallstein Verlag

ISBN: 9783892448709

Category: Decolonization

Page: 461

View: 2767

Das Britische Empire umfaßte im Zenit seiner Macht etwa ein Viertel der Erdoberfläche. Die Britische Navy durchpflügte Ende des 19. Jahrhunderts die Ozeane, als handele es sich bei ihnen um Binnenseen des Vereinigten Königreiches. Im Schatten der Pax Britannica verdichteten sich Kommunikationsstrukturen, die man heute mit dem Begriff Globalisierung charakterisiert. Kurzum: Das britische Weltreich hat untilgbare Spuren hinterlassen. Dennoch vollzog sich der Prozeß der Dekolonisation nach 1945 aus britischer Perspektive nicht nur vergleichsweise schnell, sondern auch erstaunlich geräuschlos. Die in jüngster Zeit von inner- wie außerwissenschaftlichen Impulsen neu angeregte Empire-Forschung hat jedoch Zweifel an der Version eines >disimperialism ohne Trauma oder Tränen angemeldet. Allerdings fehlten bislang empirisch fundierte Untersuchungen zur inneren Dekolonisation Großbritanniens. Vor allem die veröffentlichte Meinung wurde von der Forschung weitgehend außer acht gelassen. Die Studie Abschied vom Empire

The Living Age

Author: N.A

Publisher: N.A

ISBN: N.A

Category:

Page: N.A

View: 305

Priests of Our Democracy

The Supreme Court, Academic Freedom, and the Anti-Communist Purge

Author: Marjorie Heins

Publisher: NYU Press

ISBN: 0814770266

Category: Law

Page: 384

View: 8600

Priests of Our Democracy tells of the teachers and professors who battled the anti-communist witch hunt of the 1950s. It traces the political fortunes of academic freedom beginning in the late 19th century, both on campus and in the courts. Combining political and legal history with wrenching personal stories, the book details how the anti-communist excesses of the 1950s inspired the Supreme Court to recognize the vital role of teachers and professors in American democracy. The crushing of dissent in the 1950s impoverished political discourse in ways that are still being felt, and First Amendment academic freedom, a product of that period, is in peril today. In compelling terms, this book shows why the issue should matter to everyone.

The Empire: A Series of Letters

Published in 'The Daily News', 1862, 1863

Author: Goldwin Smith

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

ISBN: 1108022979

Category: Political Science

Page: 336

View: 9150

A collection of letters concerning British colonial interests written by a staunch anti-imperialist, first published in 1863.

Fiction of the New Statesman, 1913-1939

Author: Bashir Abu-Manneh

Publisher: Lexington Books

ISBN: 1611493528

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 255

View: 3098

Fiction of the New Statesman is the first study of the short stories published in the renowned British journal theNew Statesman. This book argues that New Statesman fiction advances a strong realist preoccupation with ordinary, everyday life, and shows how British domestic concerns have a strong hold on the working-class and lower-middle-class imaginative output of this period.

Empire

Die neue Weltordnung

Author: Michael Hardt,Antonio Negri

Publisher: Campus Verlag

ISBN: 3593418991

Category: Fiction

Page: 461

View: 2854

Nach einem Vierteljahrhundert politischer Theoriemüdigkeit haben Hardt und Negri mit ihrer brillanten, provokanten und heiß diskutierten Analyse des postmodernen Kapitalismus im Zeitalter der Globalisierung das Denken wieder in Bewegung gebracht. Der Hoffnung auf die politische Gestaltbarkeit einer neuen, gerechteren Weltordnung haben sie damit ein anspruchsvolles theoretisches Fundament gegeben. "Eine grandiose Gesellschaftsanalyse, die unser Unbehagen bündelt und ihm eine Richtung gibt, für die in der Geschichte der Philosophie das Wort vom 'guten Leben' steht." Die Zeit "Das Jahrzehnt linker Melancholie ist vorüber." Neue Zürcher Zeitung

Empire of Cotton

A Global History

Author: Sven Beckert

Publisher: Vintage

ISBN: 0385353251

Category: History

Page: 640

View: 3139

The epic story of the rise and fall of the empire of cotton, its centrality to the world economy, and its making and remaking of global capitalism. Cotton is so ubiquitous as to be almost invisible, yet understanding its history is key to understanding the origins of modern capitalism. Sven Beckert’s rich, fascinating book tells the story of how, in a remarkably brief period, European entrepreneurs and powerful statesmen recast the world’s most significant manufacturing industry, combining imperial expansion and slave labor with new machines and wage workers to change the world. Here is the story of how, beginning well before the advent of machine production in the 1780s, these men captured ancient trades and skills in Asia, and combined them with the expropriation of lands in the Americas and the enslavement of African workers to crucially reshape the disparate realms of cotton that had existed for millennia, and how industrial capitalism gave birth to an empire, and how this force transformed the world. The empire of cotton was, from the beginning, a fulcrum of constant global struggle between slaves and planters, merchants and statesmen, workers and factory owners. Beckert makes clear how these forces ushered in the world of modern capitalism, including the vast wealth and disturbing inequalities that are with us today. The result is a book as unsettling as it is enlightening: a book that brilliantly weaves together the story of cotton with how the present global world came to exist.

An Ottoman Statesman in War and Peace

Ahmed Resmi Efendi, 1700-1783

Author: Virginia H. Aksan

Publisher: BRILL

ISBN: 9789004101166

Category: History

Page: 253

View: 6270

This study of Ahmed Resmi, servant and critic of the state, offers new insights into Ottoman eighteenth-century society, emphasizing the impact of the 1768-74 Russo-Turkish war on an outmoded world-view, and the call for the reconstruction of the Ottoman polity.

From Republic to Empire

Rhetoric, Religion, and Power in the Visual Culture of Ancient Rome

Author: John Pollini

Publisher: University of Oklahoma Press

ISBN: 0806188162

Category: Art

Page: 576

View: 2394

Political image-making—especially from the Age of Augustus, when the Roman Republic evolved into a system capable of governing a vast, culturally diverse empire—is the focus of this masterful study of Roman culture. Distinguished art historian and classical archaeologist John Pollini explores how various artistic and ideological symbols of religion and power, based on Roman Republican values and traditions, were taken over or refashioned to convey new ideological content in the constantly changing political world of imperial Rome. Religion, civic life, and politics went hand in hand and formed the very fabric of ancient Roman society. Visual rhetoric was a most effective way to communicate and commemorate the ideals, virtues, and political programs of the leaders of the Roman State in an empire where few people could read and many different languages were spoken. Public memorialization could keep Roman leaders and their achievements before the eyes of the populace, in Rome and in cities under Roman sway. A leader’s success demonstrated that he had the favor of the gods—a form of legitimation crucial for sustaining the Roman Principate, or government by a “First Citizen.” Pollini examines works and traditions ranging from coins to statues and reliefs. He considers the realistic tradition of sculptural portraiture and the ways Roman leaders from the late Republic through the Imperial period were represented in relation to the divine. In comparing visual and verbal expression, he likens sculptural imagery to the structure, syntax, and diction of the Latin language and to ancient rhetorical figures of speech. Throughout the book, Pollini’s vast knowledge of ancient history, religion, literature, and politics extends his analysis far beyond visual culture to every aspect of ancient Roman civilization, including the empire’s ultimate conversion to Christianity. Readers will gain a thorough understanding of the relationship between artistic developments and political change in ancient Rome.

Parliamentary Debates

Official Report

Author: Great Britain. Parliament. House of Commons

Publisher: N.A

ISBN: N.A

Category: Great Britain

Page: N.A

View: 5632

Contains the 4th session of the 28th Parliament through the session of the Parliament.

Trial by Friendship

Anglo-American Relations, 1917-1918

Author: David R. Woodward

Publisher: University Press of Kentucky

ISBN: 0813158451

Category: History

Page: 286

View: 8214

During the crucial period of 1917-1918, the United States superseded Great Britain as the premier power in the world. The differing strategic perspectives of London and Washington were central to the tensions and misunderstandings that separated the two dominant powers in 1918 and determined how these two countries would interact following the Armistice. David R. Woodward traces the projection of American military power to western Europe and analyzes in depth the strategic goals of the American political and military leadership in this first comprehensive study of Anglo-American relations in the land war in Europe. Based on extensive research in British and American archives, the study focuses on Woodrow Wilson and David Lloyd George, whose relationship was poisoned by the mutual suspicion and hostility generated by their disagreements over strategy and military policy. President Wilson sought to use his country's military effort in western Europe as a tool to gain acceptance for his "new diplomacy." The British, anxious over the Turko-German threat to Asia and their worsening manpower situation, sought to utilize American military intervention for their own political/military purposes. Woodward's use of unpublished sources provides new perspectives on war leadership, and his analysis of the British-American interaction serves as a case study of the inevitable tension between national self-interest and efforts at collective security, even among nations that share many cultural and political values. For historians and anyone interested in military history and World War I, Trial by Friendship fills a gap in the study of Anglo-American relations by providing a strong, well- written study on an area of American history that has received scant attention from scholars.

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