Search Results: espionage-and-the-roots-of-the-cold-war

Espionage and the Roots of the Cold War

The Conspiratorial Heritage

Author: David McKnight

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 1136338128

Category: History

Page: 252

View: 1809

From the 1930s to the 1950s a large number of left-wing men and women in the USA, Britain, Europe, Australia and Canada were recruited to the Soviet intelligence services. They were amateurs and the reason for their success is intriguing. Using Soviet archives, this work explores these successes.

A Very Principled Boy

The Life of Duncan Lee, Red Spy and Cold Warrior

Author: Mark A. Bradley

Publisher: Basic Books (AZ)

ISBN: 0465030092

Category: Biography & Autobiography

Page: 384

View: 6897

Drawing on previously unreleased CIA and State Department records, this real-life story of espionage, misguided idealism and high treason follows a communist sympathizer who used his position as aid to the intelligence chief to leak critical information to the Soviets during World War II.

How the Cold War Began

Author: Amy Knight

Publisher: Basic Books

ISBN: 078673308X

Category: History

Page: 304

View: 1200

On September 5, 1945, Soviet cipher clerk Igor Gouzenko severed ties with his embassy in Ottawa, Canada, reporting allegations to authorities of a Soviet espionage network in North America. His defection — the first following the end of WWII, occurring less than a month after atomic bombs exploded over Japan — sent shockwaves through Washington, London, and Ottawa. The three allies, who until weeks earlier had been aligned with the Soviets, feared that key atomic secrets had been given to Russian agents, affecting the balance of postwar power. In her riveting narrative, Amy Knight documents how Gouzenko's defection, and the events that followed it, triggered Cold War fears and altered the course of modern history. Knight sheds new light on the Gouzenko Affair, showing how J. Edgar Hoover hoped to discredit the Truman administration by incriminating U.S. government insiders Alger Hiss and Harry Dexter White. She also probes Gouzenko's motives for defecting and brilliantly connects these events to the strained relations between the Soviet Union and the West that marked the beginning of the Cold War.

The Foundation of the CIA

Harry Truman, The Missouri Gang, and the Origins of the Cold War

Author: Richard E. Schroeder

Publisher: University of Missouri Press

ISBN: 0826273939

Category: Political Science

Page: 185

View: 7094

This highly accessible book provides new material and a fresh perspective on American National Intelligence practice, focusing on the first fifty years of the twentieth century, when the United States took on the responsibilities of a global superpower during the first years of the Cold War. Late to the art of intelligence, the United States during World War II created a new model of combining intelligence collection and analytic functions into a single organization—the OSS. At the end of the war, President Harry Truman and a small group of advisors developed a new, centralized agency directly subordinate to and responsible to the President, despite entrenched institutional resistance. Instrumental to the creation of the CIA was a group known colloquially as the “Missouri Gang,” which included not only President Truman but equally determined fellow Missourians Clark Clifford, Sidney Souers, and Roscoe Hillenkoetter.

Red Acropolis, Black Terror

The Greek Civil War and the Origins of Soviet-American Rivalry, 1943-1949

Author: André Gerolymatos

Publisher: Basic Books (AZ)

ISBN: N.A

Category: History

Page: 300

View: 6306

The first objective full-length accounting of the Greek Civil War takes readers back to the dawn of the Cold War, when, during the closing days of World War II, Greek partisan factions squared off in a battle for the nation that would draw the Soviet Union, Great Britain, and the U.S. into the conflict. 25,000 first printing.

Secret World

A History of Intelligence

Author: Christopher Andrew

Publisher: Yale University Press

ISBN: 030024052X

Category: Political Science

Page: 896

View: 4143

The first-ever detailed, comprehensive history of intelligence, from Moses and Sun Tzu to the present day The history of espionage is far older than any of today’s intelligence agencies, yet the long history of intelligence operations has been largely forgotten. The codebreakers at Bletchley Park, the most successful World War II intelligence agency, were completely unaware that their predecessors in earlier moments of national crisis had broken the codes of Napoleon during the Napoleonic wars and those of Spain before the Spanish Armada. Those who do not understand past mistakes are likely to repeat them. Intelligence is a prime example. At the outbreak of World War I, the grasp of intelligence shown by U.S. President Woodrow Wilson and British Prime Minister Herbert Asquith was not in the same class as that of George Washington during the Revolutionary War and leading eighteenth-century British statesmen. In this book, the first global history of espionage ever written, distinguished historian Christopher Andrew recovers much of the lost intelligence history of the past three millennia—and shows us its relevance.

Spies

The Rise and Fall of the KGB in America

Author: John Earl Haynes

Publisher: Yale University Press

ISBN: 0300155727

Category: Espionage, Soviet

Page: 650

View: 2693

This stunning book, based on KGB archives that have never come to light before, provides the most complete account of Soviet espionage in America ever written. In 1993, former KGB officer Alexander Vassiliev was permitted unique access to Stalin-era records of Soviet intelligence operations against the United States. Years later, living in Britain, Vassiliev retrieved his extensive notebooks of transcribed documents from Moscow.With these notebooks John Earl Haynes and Harvey Klehr have meticulously constructed a new, sometimes shocking, historical account.Along with general insights into espionage tactics and the motives of Americans who spied for Stalin, "Spies" resolves specific, long-seething controversies. The book confirms, among many other things, that Alger Hiss cooperated with Soviet intelligence over a long period of years, that journalist I. F. Stone worked on behalf of the KGB in the 1930s, and that Robert Oppenheimer was never recruited by Soviet intelligence. "Spies" also uncovers numerous American spies who were never even under suspicion and satisfyingly identifies the last unaccounted for American nuclear spies. Vassiliev tells the story of the notebooks and his own extraordinary life in a gripping introduction to the volume.

Debating the Origins of the Cold War

American and Russian Perspectives

Author: Ralph B. Levering

Publisher: Rowman & Littlefield

ISBN: 9780847694082

Category: History

Page: 200

View: 5144

Debating the Origins of the Cold War examines the coming of the Cold War through Americans' and Russians' contrasting perspectives and actions. In two engaging essays, the authors demonstrate that a huge gap existed between the democratic, capitalist, and global vision of the post-World War II peace that most Americans believed in and the dictatorial, xenophobic, and regional approach that characterized Soviet policies. The authors argue that repeated failures to find mutually acceptable solutions to concrete problems led to the rapid development of the Cold War, and they conclude that, given the respective concerns and perspectives of the time, both superpowers were largely justified in their courses of action. Supplemented by primary sources, including documents detailing Soviet espionage in the United States during the 1930s and 1940s and correspondence between Premier Josef Stalin and Foreign Minister V. M. Molotov during postwar meetings, this is the first book to give equal attention to the U.S. and Soviet policies and perspectives.

The Contours of America’s Cold War

Author: Matthew Farish

Publisher: U of Minnesota Press

ISBN: 9781452901121

Category:

Page: N.A

View: 9330

The Atomic Bomb and the Origins of the Cold War

Author: Campbell Craig,Sergey S Radchenko

Publisher: Yale University Press

ISBN: 030014265X

Category: History

Page: 232

View: 9766

After a devastating world war, culminating in the obliteration of Hiroshima and Nagasaki, it was clear that the United States and the Soviet Union had to establish a cooperative order if the planet was to escape an atomic World War III. In this provocative study, Campbell Craig and Sergey Radchenko show how the atomic bomb pushed the United States and the Soviet Union not toward cooperation but toward deep bipolar confrontation. Joseph Stalin, sure that the Americans meant to deploy their new weapon against Russia and defeat socialism, would stop at nothing to build his own bomb. Harry Truman, initially willing to consider cooperation, discovered that its pursuit would mean political suicide, especially when news of Soviet atomic spies reached the public. Both superpowers, moreover, discerned a new reality of the atomic age: now, cooperation must be total. The dangers posed by the bomb meant that intermediate measures of international cooperation would protect no one. Yet no two nations in history were less prepared to pursue total cooperation than were the United States and the Soviet Union. The logic of the bomb pointed them toward immediate Cold War.

The Working Class Majority

America's Best Kept Secret, Second Edition

Author: John Sbardellati

Publisher: Cornell University Press

ISBN: 0801464684

Category: Social Science

Page: 264

View: 6140

Between 1942 and 1958, J. Edgar Hoover's Federal Bureau of Investigation conducted a sweeping and sustained investigation of the motion picture industry to expose Hollywood's alleged subversion of "the American Way" through its depiction of social problems, class differences, and alternative political ideologies. FBI informants (their names still redacted today) reported to Hoover's G-men on screenplays and screenings of such films as Frank Capra's It's a Wonderful Life (1946), noting that "this picture deliberately maligned the upper class attempting to show that people who had money were mean and despicable characters." The FBI's anxiety over this film was not unique; it extended to a wide range of popular and critical successes, including The Grapes of Wrath (1940), The Best Years of Our Lives (1946), Crossfire (1947) and On the Waterfront (1954). In J. Edgar Hoover Goes to the Movies, John Sbardellati provides a new consideration of Hollywood's history and the post-World War II Red Scare. In addition to governmental intrusion into the creative process, he details the efforts of left-wing filmmakers to use the medium to bring social problems to light and the campaigns of their colleagues on the political right, through such organizations as the Motion Picture Alliance for the Preservation of American Ideals, to prevent dissemination of "un-American" ideas and beliefs. Sbardellati argues that the attack on Hollywood drew its motivation from a sincerely held fear that film content endangered national security by fostering a culture that would be at best apathetic to the Cold War struggle at best, or, at its worst, conducive to communism at home. Those who took part in Hollywood's Cold War struggle, whether on the left or right, shared one common trait: a belief that the movies could serve as engines for social change. This strongly held assumption explains why the stakes were so high and, ultimately, why Hollywood became one of the most important ideological battlegrounds of the Cold War.

Interrogation Nation

Refugees and Spies in Cold War Germany

Author: Keith R. Allen

Publisher: Rowman & Littlefield

ISBN: 1538101521

Category: History

Page: 310

View: 6606

This groundbreaking book explores the treatment of the millions of refugees and tens of thousands of spies that flooded Germany after World War II. Drawing on newly declassified espionage files, Keith R. Allen uncovers long-hidden interrogation systems that were developed by Germany’s western occupiers to protect internal security and gather intelligence about the Soviet Union. He shows how vetting in the name of public order brought foreign intelligence officials into practically every venue, from train stations to corporate boardrooms to private dwellings, in postwar West Germany. At the heart of efforts to extract insights were extensive, personalized efforts by law enforcement and security officials to manipulate desires and emotions involving dearest family members, closest friends, and trusted colleagues. Linking personal narratives of those interrogated to the international context of postwar politics, Allen reveals a compelling world inhabited by spies and refugees. Allen's study illuminates the places, personalities, and practices of refugee interrogation in one of Europe’s most successful postwar states. As calls for intense scrutiny of refugees have grown dramatically, Allen illustrates how decisions to shortchange the rights of migrants in periods of heightened ideological and military tension may contribute to long-term threats to personal liberties and the rule of law.

Rising Tide

The Untold Story of the Russian Submarines That Fought the Cold War

Author: Gary E. Weir,Walter J. Boyne

Publisher: Nal Caliber

ISBN: 9780451213013

Category: History

Page: 354

View: 841

A chronicle of the submarine conflicts between the United States and the Soviet Union, told from the viewpoints of seven Russian admirals, discusses the surveillance of U.S. marine craft, their innovative techniques, the development of the first nuclear submarines, and their firsthand experiences in key battles. Reprint.

American Betrayal

The Secret Assault on Our Nation's Character

Author: Diana West

Publisher: Macmillan

ISBN: 0312630786

Category: History

Page: 403

View: 4542

Argues that today's government has abandoned basic beliefs in favor of socialist practices, citing the roles Truman, Eisenhower, McCarthy, and others in allowing Russian influences, promoting liberalism, and enabling Islamic tolerance.

No Live Files Remain

Author: Andras Forgach

Publisher: Simon and Schuster

ISBN: 1471160602

Category: Fiction

Page: 400

View: 6247

For readers of The Lives of Others and The Reader, and based on a true story, No Live Files Remain is a beautiful and moving novel of family, lies, betrayal and forgiveness. He wanted to understand the past. Now he must live with the truth. Thirty years after the fall of communism in Hungary, as acclaimed writer, translator, dramatist and visual artist Andras Forgach investigated his family's past he uncovered a horrifying truth. His mother, whom he deeply loved, had been an informant for the Kadar regime. She had informed not only on acquaintances but on family, friends and even her children. In the eagerly anticipated No Live Files Remain, with rights sold around the world, Forgach gives voice to his deceased mother, holding her responsible for her deeds while defending the memories he cherished of her as a son. 'Mother wasn't lacking in evocativeness, no, no, I can affirm that. She was the firmament, the high sky, and she still is, even covered in heavy clouds.' Andras Forgach

Spy Capitalism

ITEK and the CIA

Author: Jonathan E. Lewis

Publisher: Yale University Press

ISBN: 030012905X

Category: History

Page: 336

View: 8945

What happens when the world of venture capital collides with the world of espionage? To find the answer, Jonathan E. Lewis takes us inside the executive suite at Itek Corporation during the Cold War years from 1957 to 1965. Itek was manufacturing the world’s most sophisticated satellite reconnaissance cameras, and the information these cameras provided about Soviet missiles and military activity was critical to U.S. security. So was Itek. This intriguing book examines in unprecedented detail the challenges Itek faced not only as a contractor for the most important national security program of the time—the CIA’s Project CORONA spy satellite—but also as a start-up company competing with established industrial giants. In telling the story of Itek Corporation, Lewis fills important gaps in the history of American intelligence, business history, and management studies. In addition, he addresses a variety of important themes such as the compatibility of secrecy and capitalism, the struggle between profits and patriotism, and the workings of power and connections in America. Lewis explores how Itek executives contended with myriad business problems that were compounded by the need to raise capital without revealing the complete truth about the company’s highly secret business. He also presents for the first time information about Laurance Rockefeller’s venture capital operations and his role in financing Itek, based on the financier’s private Itek papers. The book is both a remarkable case study of a company at the heart of the American intelligence-industrial complex during the Cold War and a thought-provoking examination of the impact of the CIA on the capitalist system it was created to defend.

Have the Mountains Fallen?

Two Journeys of Loss and Redemption in the Cold War

Author: Jeffrey Lilley

Publisher: Indiana University Press

ISBN: 0253032431

Category: Biography & Autobiography

Page: 312

View: 3602

Cover -- Contents -- Preface -- Acknowledgments -- Note on Transliteration and Translation -- List of Names -- Timeline -- PART I -- 1 Flight -- 2 Seeds of Rebellion -- 3 Have the Mountains Fallen? -- 4 The Burdens of War -- PART II -- 5 Chinese with a Dog -- 6 Recovering Dignity -- 7 The Sting of Rejection -- 8 Balancing Acts -- PART III -- 9 American Rendezvous -- 10 Standing Up to Injustice -- 11 Waves of Change -- 12 An Expiring Ideology -- PART IV -- 13 The Wheels of Truth -- 14 New Beginnings -- 15 Times of Tumult -- 16 Holy Ground -- Epilogue -- Notes -- Bibliography -- Interviews -- Index -- A -- B -- C -- D -- E -- F -- G -- H -- I -- J -- K -- L -- M -- N -- O -- P -- R -- S -- T -- U -- V -- W -- X -- Y -- Z

A Legacy of Spies

A Novel

Author: John le Carré

Publisher: Penguin

ISBN: 0735225125

Category: Fiction

Page: 272

View: 688

#1 NEW YORK TIMES BESTSELLER The undisputed master returns with a riveting new book—his first Smiley novel in more than twenty-five years Peter Guillam, staunch colleague and disciple of George Smiley of the British Secret Service, otherwise known as the Circus, is living out his old age on the family farmstead on the south coast of Brittany when a letter from his old Service summons him to London. The reason? His Cold War past has come back to claim him. Intelligence operations that were once the toast of secret London, and involved such characters as Alec Leamas, Jim Prideaux, George Smiley and Peter Guillam himself, are to be scrutinized by a generation with no memory of the Cold War and no patience with its justifications. Interweaving past with present so that each may tell its own intense story, John le Carré has spun a single plot as ingenious and thrilling as the two predecessors on which it looks back: The Spy Who Came in from the Cold and Tinker Tailor Soldier Spy. In a story resonating with tension, humor and moral ambivalence, le Carré and his narrator Peter Guillam present the reader with a legacy of unforgettable characters old and new.

Code Warriors

NSA's Codebreakers and the Secret Intelligence War Against the Soviet Union

Author: Stephen Budiansky

Publisher: Vintage

ISBN: 0385352670

Category: Political Science

Page: 416

View: 3215

A sweeping, in-depth history of NSA, whose famous “cult of silence” has left the agency shrouded in mystery for decades The National Security Agency was born out of the legendary codebreaking programs of World War II that cracked the famed Enigma machine and other German and Japanese codes, thereby turning the tide of Allied victory. In the postwar years, as the United States developed a new enemy in the Soviet Union, our intelligence community found itself targeting not soldiers on the battlefield, but suspected spies, foreign leaders, and even American citizens. Throughout the second half of the twentieth century, NSA played a vital, often fraught and controversial role in the major events of the Cold War, from the Korean War to the Cuban Missile Crisis to Vietnam and beyond. In Code Warriors, Stephen Budiansky—a longtime expert in cryptology—tells the fascinating story of how NSA came to be, from its roots in World War II through the fall of the Berlin Wall. Along the way, he guides us through the fascinating challenges faced by cryptanalysts, and how they broke some of the most complicated codes of the twentieth century. With access to new documents, Budiansky shows where the agency succeeded and failed during the Cold War, but his account also offers crucial perspective for assessing NSA today in the wake of the Edward Snowden revelations. Budiansky shows how NSA’s obsession with recording every bit of data and decoding every signal is far from a new development; throughout its history the depth and breadth of the agency’s reach has resulted in both remarkable successes and destructive failures. Featuring a series of appendixes that explain the technical details of Soviet codes and how they were broken, this is a rich and riveting history of the underbelly of the Cold War, and an essential and timely read for all who seek to understand the origins of the modern NSA. From the Hardcover edition.

Spymaster

The Life of Britain's Most Decorated Cold War Spy and Head of MI6, Sir Maurice Oldfield

Author: Martin Pearce

Publisher: Random House

ISBN: 1473525357

Category: Biography & Autobiography

Page: 496

View: 3443

'I cannot think of a better biography of a spy chief' Richard Davenport-Hines, The Spectator Sir Maurice Oldfield was one of the most important British spies of the Cold War era. A farmer’s son from a provincial grammar school who found himself accidentally plunged into the world of espionage, Sir Maurice was the first Chief of MI6 who didn’t come to the role via the traditional public school and Oxbridge route. Oldfield was the voice of British Intelligence in Washington at the time of the Cuban Missile Crisis and the assassination of JFK, and was largely responsible for keeping the UK out of the Vietnam War. Working his way to the top of the secret service, he took on the job of rebuilding confidence in the British Secret Service in the wake of the Philby, Burgess and Maclean spy scandals. This is the fascinating life story, told in detail for the first time, of a complex, likable character as well as a formidable intelligence chief.

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