Search Results: fasting-and-feasting-the-life-of-visionary-food-writer-patience-gray

Fasting and Feasting

The Life of Visionary Food Writer Patience Gray

Author: Adam Federman

Publisher: Chelsea Green Publishing

ISBN: 1603586091

Category: Biography & Autobiography

Page: 384

View: 6679

A New York Times Notable Book for 2017--Now in Paperback For more than thirty years, Patience Gray—author of the celebrated cookbook Honey from a Weed—lived in a remote area of Puglia in southernmost Italy. She lived without electricity, modern plumbing, or a telephone, grew much of her own food, and gathered and ate wild plants alongside her neighbors in this economically impoverished region. She was fond of saying that she wrote only for herself and her friends, yet her growing reputation brought a steady stream of international visitors to her door. This simple and isolated life she chose for herself may help explain her relative obscurity when compared to the other great food writers of her time: M. F. K. Fisher, Elizabeth David, and Julia Child. So it is not surprising that when Gray died in 2005, the BBC described her as an “almost forgotten culinary star.” Yet her influence, particularly among chefs and other food writers, has had a lasting and profound effect on the way we view and celebrate good food and regional cuisines. Gray’s prescience was unrivaled: She wrote about what today we would call the Slow Food movement—from foraging to eating locally—long before it became part of the cultural mainstream. Imagine if Michael Pollan or Barbara Kingsolver had spent several decades living among Italian, Greek, and Catalan peasants, recording their recipes and the significance of food and food gathering to their way of life. In Fasting and Feasting, biographer Adam Federman tells the remarkable—and until now untold—life story of Patience Gray: from her privileged and intellectual upbringing in England, to her trials as a single mother during World War II, to her career working as a designer, editor, translator, and author, and describing her travels and culinary adventures in later years. A fascinating and spirited woman, Patience Gray was very much a part of her times but very clearly ahead of them.

Fasting and Feasting

The Life of Visionary Food Writer Patience Gray

Author: Adam Federman

Publisher: Chelsea Green Publishing

ISBN: 1603586083

Category: Biography & Autobiography

Page: 384

View: 9750

For more than thirty years, Patience Gray--author of the celebrated cookbook Honey from a Weed--lived in a remote area of Puglia in southernmost Italy. She lived without electricity, modern plumbing, or a telephone, grew much of her own food, and gathered and ate wild plants alongside her neighbors in this economically impoverished region. She was fond of saying that she wrote only for herself and her friends, yet her growing reputation brought a steady stream of international visitors to her door. This simple and isolated life she chose for herself may help explain her relative obscurity when compared to the other great food writers of her time: M. F. K. Fisher, Elizabeth David, and Julia Child. So it is not surprising that when Gray died in 2005, the BBC described her as an "almost forgotten culinary star." Yet her influence, particularly among chefs and other food writers, has had a lasting and profound effect on the way we view and celebrate good food and regional cuisines. Gray's prescience was unrivaled: She wrote about what today we would call the Slow Food movement--from foraging to eating locally--long before it became part of the cultural mainstream. Imagine if Michael Pollan or Barbara Kingsolver had spent several decades living among Italian, Greek, and Catalan peasants, recording their recipes and the significance of food and food gathering to their way of life. In Fasting and Feasting, biographer Adam Federman tells the remarkable--and until now untold--life story of Patience Gray: from her privileged and intellectual upbringing in England, to her trials as a single mother during World War II, to her career working as a designer, editor, translator, and author, and describing her travels and culinary adventures in later years. A fascinating and spirited woman, Patience Gray was very much a part of her times but very clearly ahead of them.

Fasting and Feasting

The Life of Visionary Food Writer Patience Gray

Author: Adam Federman

Publisher: Chelsea Green Publishing Company

ISBN: 9781603588232

Category: Biography & Autobiography

Page: 384

View: 8823

A New York Times Notable Book for 2017 For more than thirty years, Patience Gray--author of the celebrated cookbook Honey from a Weed--lived in a remote area of Puglia in southernmost Italy. She lived without electricity, modern plumbing, or a telephone, grew much of her own food, and gathered and ate wild plants alongside her neighbors in this economically impoverished region. She was fond of saying that she wrote only for herself and her friends, yet her growing reputation brought a steady stream of international visitors to her door. This simple and isolated life she chose for herself may help explain her relative obscurity when compared to the other great food writers of her time: M. F. K. Fisher, Elizabeth David, and Julia Child. So it is not surprising that when Gray died in 2005, the BBC described her as an "almost forgotten culinary star." Yet her influence, particularly among chefs and other food writers, has had a lasting and profound effect on the way we view and celebrate good food and regional cuisines. Gray's prescience was unrivaled: She wrote about what today we would call the Slow Food movement--from foraging to eating locally--long before it became part of the cultural mainstream. Imagine if Michael Pollan or Barbara Kingsolver had spent several decades living among Italian, Greek, and Catalan peasants, recording their recipes and the significance of food and food gathering to their way of life. In Fasting and Feasting, biographer Adam Federman tells the remarkable--and until now untold--life story of Patience Gray: from her privileged and intellectual upbringing in England, to her trials as a single mother during World War II, to her career working as a designer, editor, translator, and author, and describing her travels and culinary adventures in later years. A fascinating and spirited woman, Patience Gray was very much a part of her times but very clearly ahead of them.

Fasting and Feasting

The Life of Visionary Food Writer Patience Gray

Author: Adam Federman

Publisher: Chelsea Green Publishing

ISBN: 1603587527

Category:

Page: 400

View: 7118

Honey from a Weed

Fasting and Feasting in Tuscany, Catalonia, the Cyclades, and Apulia

Author: Patience Gray

Publisher: Prospect Books (UK)

ISBN: 9781903018200

Category: Cooking

Page: 374

View: 3485

This book is perhaps the jewel in Prospect's crown. Within a few months of its first appearance in 1986 it was hailed as a modern classic. Fiona MacCarthy wrote in The Times that, 'the book is a large and grandiose life history, a passionate narrative of extremes of experience.' Jeremy Round called Patience Gray 'the high priestess of cooking', whose book 'pushes the form of the cookery book as far as it can go.' Angela Carter remarked that 'it was less a cookery book that a summing-up of the genre of the late-modern British cookery book.' The work has attracted a cult following in the United States, where passages have been read out at great length on the radio; and it has been anthologized by Paul Levy in The Penguin Book of Food and Drink. It was given a special award by the Andr� Simon Book Prize committee in 1987.

Ring Doves and Snakes

Author: Patience Gray

Publisher: MacMillan

ISBN: N.A

Category: Greece

Page: 181

View: 7932

An autobiographical account of a year spent in Greece.

Plats Du Jour

Author: Patience Gray,Primrose Boyd

Publisher: Persephone Books

ISBN: 9781903155608

Category: Cooking, European

Page: 304

View: 1787

What She Ate

Six Remarkable Women and the Food that Tells Their Stories

Author: Laura Shapiro

Publisher: Penguin

ISBN: 0525427643

Category: Biography & Autobiography

Page: 307

View: 8981

A Washington Post Notable Nonfiction Book of 2017 One of NPR Fresh Air's "Books to Close Out a Chaotic 2017" NPR's Book Concierge Guide To 2017's Great Reads "How lucky for us readers that Shapiro has been listening so perceptively for decades to the language of food." --Maureen Corrigan, NPR Fresh Air Six "mouthwatering" (Eater.com) short takes on six famous women through the lens of food and cooking, probing how their attitudes toward food can offer surprising new insights into their lives, and our own. Everyone eats, and food touches on every aspect of our lives--social and cultural, personal and political. Yet most biographers pay little attention to people's attitudes toward food, as if the great and notable never bothered to think about what was on the plate in front of them. Once we ask how somebody relates to food, we find a whole world of different and provocative ways to understand her. Food stories can be as intimate and revealing as stories of love, work, or coming-of-age. Each of the six women in this entertaining group portrait was famous in her time, and most are still famous in ours; but until now, nobody has told their lives from the point of view of the kitchen and the table. What She Ate is a lively and unpredictable array of women; what they have in common with one another (and us) is a powerful relationship with food. They include Dorothy Wordsworth, whose food story transforms our picture of the life she shared with her famous poet brother; Rosa Lewis, the Edwardian-era Cockney caterer who cooked her way up the social ladder; Eleanor Roosevelt, First Lady and rigorous protector of the worst cook in White House history; Eva Braun, Hitler's mistress, who challenges our warm associations of food, family, and table; Barbara Pym, whose witty books upend a host of stereotypes about postwar British cuisine; and Helen Gurley Brown, the editor of Cosmopolitan, whose commitment to "having it all" meant having almost nothing on the plate except a supersized portion of diet gelatin.

The Quarry Fox: And Other Critters of the Wild Catskills

Author: Leslie T. Sharpe

Publisher: The Overlook Press

ISBN: 1468315307

Category: Nature

Page: 256

View: 8585

Reflections on the private lives of the wild critters of the Catskills, from birds to moths to wild deer, by a lifelong naturalist A red fox stands poised at the edge of a woodchuck den, his ears perked for danger as two pudgy fox cubs frolic nearby. A mother black bear and her cubs hibernate beneath a felled tree. A barred owl snags a hapless cottontail from a meadow with its precise talons. In The Quarry Fox and Other Tales of the Wild Catskills, Leslie T. Sharpe trains her keen eye and narrative gifts on these and other New York wildlife through her tales of close observations as a naturalist living in the Great Western Catskills. The Quarry Fox is the first in-depth study of Catskill wildlife since John Burroughs invented the genre of nature-writing, in which Sharpe weaves her experiences with the seasons, plants, and creatures with the natural history of each organism, revealing their sensitivity to and resilience against the splendor and cruelty of Nature. Sharpe's frank, scientific observations join with her deeply felt connection to these creatures to instill in readers an appreciation of the undaunted and variegated beauty of the Catskills and camaraderie with its animals. From contemplating the importance of milkweed for monarchs to lay their eggs to reveling in the first steps of a wobbly fawn, The Quarry Fox is a celebration of the natural world and our place in it.

The Missing Ingredient

The Curious Role of Time in Food and Flavour

Author: Jenny Linford

Publisher: Penguin UK

ISBN: 1846148987

Category: Cooking

Page: 352

View: 1096

The Missing Ingredient is about what makes good food, and the first book to consider the intrinsic yet often forgotten role of time in creating the flavours and textures we love. Written through a series of encounters with ingredients, producers, cooks, shopkeepers and chefs, exploring everything from the brief period in which sugar caramelises, or the days required in the crucial process of fermentation, to the months of slow ripening and close attention that make a great cheddar, or the years needed for certain wines to reach their peak, Jenny Linford shows how, time and again, time itself is the invisible ingredient. From the patience and dedication of many food producers in fields and storehouses around the world to the rapid reactions required of any home cook at the hob, this book allows us to better understand our culinary lives.

East End Paradise

Kitchen Garden Cooking in the City

Author: Jojo Tulloh

Publisher: Random House

ISBN: 1446444104

Category: Cooking

Page: 50

View: 6447

Those of us living in towns and cities might think that the pleasures of growing our own food, watching the seasons pass with the changing produce and getting our hands stuck into the soil are beyond our reach. But a growing number of urban dwellers are realising that there are ways of connecting with the land, and enjoying the sheer pleasure of watching something grow, without giving up the joys of living in the city. Jojo Tulloh takes us to her inner-city allotment and guides us through a year of cooking, inspired by the food that has sprung from her surprisingly fertile patch of East London waste-ground.

The Reporter's Kitchen

Essays

Author: Jane Kramer

Publisher: N.A

ISBN: 1250074371

Category: Cooking

Page: 304

View: 6763

Jane Kramer started cooking when she started writing. Her first dish, a tinned-tuna curry, was assembled on a tiny stove in her graduate student apartment while she pondered her first writing assignment. From there, whether her travels took her to a tent settlement in the Sahara for an afternoon interview with an old Berber woman toiling over goat stew, or to the great London restaurateur and author Yotam Ottolenghi's Notting Hill apartment, where they assembled a buttered phylo-and-cheese tower called a mutabbaq, Jane always returned from the field with a new recipe, and usually, a friend. For the first time, Jane's beloved food pieces from The New Yorker, where she has been a staff writer since 1964, are arranged in one place--a collection of definitive chef profiles, personal essays, and gastronomic history that is at once deeply personal and humane. The Reporter's Kitchen follows Jane everywhere, and throughout her career--from her summer writing retreat in Umbria, where Jane and her anthropologist husband host memorable expat Thanksgivings--in July--to the Nordic coast, where Jane and acclaimed Danish chef Rene Redzepi, of Noma, forage for edible sea-grass. The Reporter’s Kitchen is an important record of culture distilled through food around the world. It's welcoming and inevitably surprising.

The Plagiarist in the Kitchen

Author: Jonathan Meades

Publisher: Unbound Publishing

ISBN: 1783522410

Category: Cooking

Page: 176

View: 5556

‘I adore Meades’s book . . . I want more of his rule-breaking irreverence in my kitchen.’ New York Times ‘The Plagiarist in the Kitchen is hilariously grumpy, muttering at us “Don’t you bastards know anything?” You can read it purely for literary pleasure, but Jonathan Meades makes everything sound so delicious that the non-cook will be moved to cook and the bad cook will cook better.’ David Hare, Guardian The Plagiarist in the Kitchen is an anti-cookbook. Best known as a provocative novelist, journalist and film-maker, Jonathan Meades has also been called ‘the best amateur chef in the world’ by Marco Pierre White. His contention here is that anyone who claims to have invented a dish is delusional, dishonestly contributing to the myth of culinary originality. Meades delivers a polemical but highly usable collection of 125 of his favourite recipes, each one an example of the fine art of culinary plagiarism. These are dishes and methods he has hijacked, adapted, improved upon and made his own. Without assuming any special knowledge or skill, the book is full of excellent advice. He tells us why the British never got the hang of garlic. That a purist would never dream of putting cheese in a Gratin Dauphinois. That cooking brains in brown butter cannot be improved upon. And why – despite the advice of Martin Scorsese’s mother – he insists on frying his meatballs. Adorned with his own abstract monochrome images (none of which ‘illustrate’ the stolen recipes they accompany), The Plagiarist in the Kitchen is a stylish object, both useful and instructive. In a world dominated by health fads, food vloggers and over-priced kitchen gadgets, it is timely reminder that, when it comes to food, it’s almost always better to borrow than to invent.

Coming to My Senses

The Making of a Counterculture Cook

Author: Alice Waters

Publisher: Clarkson Potter

ISBN: 1101906650

Category: Biography & Autobiography

Page: 320

View: 7977

The long-awaited memoir from cultural icon and culinary standard bearer Alice Waters recalls the circuitous road and tumultuous times leading to the opening of what is arguably America's most influential restaurant. When Alice Waters opened the doors of her "little French restaurant" in Berkeley, California in 1971 at the age of 27, no one ever anticipated the indelible mark it would leave on the culinary landscape—Alice least of all. Fueled in equal parts by naiveté and a relentless pursuit of beauty and pure flavor, she turned her passion project into an iconic institution that redefined American cuisine for generations of chefs and food lovers. In Coming to My Senses Alice retraces the events that led her to 1517 Shattuck Avenue and the tumultuous times that emboldened her to find her own voice as a cook when the prevailing food culture was embracing convenience and uniformity. Moving from a repressive suburban upbringing to Berkeley in 1964 at the height of the Free Speech Movement and campus unrest, she was drawn into a bohemian circle of charismatic figures whose views on design, politics, film, and food would ultimately inform the unique culture on which Chez Panisse was founded. Dotted with stories, recipes, photographs, and letters, Coming to My Senses is at once deeply personal and modestly understated, a quietly revealing look at one woman's evolution from a rebellious yet impressionable follower to a respected activist who effects social and political change on a global level through the common bond of food.

Fasting, Feasting

Author: Anita Desai

Publisher: Random House

ISBN: 1448104556

Category: Fiction

Page: 240

View: 3097

SHORTLISTED FOR THE 1999 BOOKER PRIZE Uma, the plain, spinster daughter of a close-knit Indian family, is trapped at home, smothered by her overbearing parents and their traditions, unlike her ambitious younger sister Aruna, who brings off a 'good' marriage, and brother Arun, the disappointing son and heir who is studying in America. Across the world in Massachusetts, life with the Patton family is bewildering for Arun in the alien culture of freedom, freezers and paradoxically self-denying self-indulgence.

Recipes from Corsica

Author: Rolli Lucarotti

Publisher: Prospect Books (UK)

ISBN: 9781903018279

Category: Cooking

Page: 232

View: 4039

This intelligent, literate book is the only one in English on the subject of the food of Corsica.

The Third Policeman

A Novel

Author: Flann O'Brien

Publisher: Dalkey Archive Press

ISBN: 9781564782144

Category: Fiction

Page: 200

View: 5442

With the publication of The Third Policeman, Dalkey Archive Press now has all of O'Brien's fiction back in print.

The Centaur's Kitchen

A Book of French, Italian, Greek & Catalan Dishes for Ships' Cooks on the Blue Funnel Line

Author: Patience Gray,Miranda Gray

Publisher: Prospect Books (UK)

ISBN: 9781903018736

Category: Cooking

Page: 124

View: 3478

Cooking.

The Angry Chef's Guide to Spotting Bullsh*t in the World of Food

Bad Science and the Truth about Healthy Eating

Author: Anthony Warner

Publisher: The Experiment

ISBN: 1615194606

Category: Cooking

Page: 336

View: 1521

Just say no to nutri-nonsense Why is Chef Anthony Warner so angry? Two words: pseudoscience bullshit. Lies about nutrition are repeated everywhere--in newspaper headlines, on celebrity blogs, even by our well-meaning friends and family. Bad science is no reason to give up good food (we miss you, bread)! It's high time to distinguish fact from crap. As the Angry Chef, Warner skewers common food myths that range from questionable ("coconut oil is a weight-loss miracle") to patently dangerous ("autism is caused by toxins"). He also cuts down a host of fad diets--including the paleo diet and the infamous detox. Warner goes on to explain why we're so easily misled: It has a lot to do with our instinctive craving for simple explanations and straightforward rules. With help from "Science Columbo," he pares away poisonous rhetoric and serves up the delicious, nuanced truth (with a side of saucy humor). Bon appétit!

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