Search Results: fighting-for-rights

Fighting for Rights

Military Service and the Politics of Citizenship

Author: Ronald R. Krebs

Publisher: Cornell University Press

ISBN: 9780801459542

Category: History

Page: 280

View: 1770

Leaders around the globe have long turned to the armed forces as a "school for the nation." Debates over who serves continue to arouse passion today because the military's participation policies are seen as shaping politics beyond the military, specifically the politics of identity and citizenship. Yet how and when do these policies transform patterns of citizenship? Military service, Ronald R. Krebs argues, can play a critical role in bolstering minorities' efforts to grasp full and unfettered rights. Minority groups have at times effectively contrasted their people's battlefield sacrifices to the reality of inequity, compelling state leaders to concede to their claims. At the same time, military service can shape when, for what, and how minorities have engaged in political activism in the quest for meaningful citizenship. Employing a range of rich primary materials, Krebs shows how the military's participation policies shaped Arab citizens' struggles for first-class citizenship in Israel from independence to the mid-1980s and African Americans' quest for civil rights, from World War I to the Korean War. Fighting for Rights helps us make sense of contemporary debates over gays in the military and over the virtues and dangers of liberal and communitarian visions for society. It suggests that rhetoric is more than just a weapon of the weak, that it is essential to political exchange, and that politics rests on a dual foundation of rationality and culture.

Fighting for Rights

From Holy Wars to Humanitarian Military Interventions

Author: Tal Dingott Alkopher

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 1317135369

Category: Political Science

Page: 224

View: 5537

In the light of NATO's humanitarian war in Kosovo is it possible to understand or explain wars as an outcome of perceptions of rights? How did rights, be they divine rights in the Middle Ages, territorial rights in the eighteenth century, or human rights today, become something that people are willing to fight and die for? To answer these questions, this book explores the linkage between concepts of rights and the practice of war in the international arena. Alkopher describes how normative structures of rights have shaped different practices of war from medieval to modern times, through the lens of social constructivism. From the eleventh to the thirteenth century, concepts of divine rights and institutionalized practices of the Crusades to the Holy Land fostered the prevailing ideas of international rights and war. In the eighteenth century, the institutionalization of states' rights and territorial wars shaped international conflict. This view held until the late twentieth century when the institutionalization of human rights coupled with the emerging practice of humanitarian war, particularly NATO's war in Kosovo, engendered new norms of international conduct. The author concludes that rights have the power to constitute an international order that will be either cooperative or conflictual and the choice of outcome is very much in our hands. This book will be essential reading for international relations and political science scholars and students but also philosophers, legal and sociological historians and international lawyers.

Fights for Rights

Author: Ronald W. Eades

Publisher: University Press of Kentucky

ISBN: 9780813109121

Category: Political Science

Page: 58

View: 4253

As Americans, we often take our many freedoms for granted. It is easy to forget the difficulties many of our ancestors faced when fighting for the rights we now enjoy. Because the United States is a "nation of laws and not of men," these people were able to challenge unfair laws in hope of a better future. Fights for Rights explains our everyday rights of free speech and religion, the rights of the accused, and how our Constitution guarantees these rights for all people, including women and African Americans.

American Indian Rights Movement

Author: Sarah Machajewski

Publisher: The Rosen Publishing Group, Inc

ISBN: 1499428499

Category: Juvenile Nonfiction

Page: 32

View: 7760

American Indians have faced injustice from the moment Europeans came to the Americas to claim land and resources. This volume traces the history of injustice against American Indians, from losing their land, to moving to reservations, to having their culture stolen from them. Readers will learn how the movement for rights began, and the challenges and successes activists faced. Primary sources and photographs from the movement will bring readers back in time to fully grasp the importance of events. The book concludes by challenging readers to think about how they could help advance American Indian rights today.

Peaceful Fights for Equal Rights

Author: Rob Sanders

Publisher: Simon & Schuster Books for Young Readers

ISBN: 1534429433

Category: Juvenile Fiction

Page: 48

View: 3598

A primer for peaceful protest, resistance, and activism from the author of Rodzilla and Pride: The Story of Harvey Milk and the Rainbow Flag. Protesting. Standing up for what’s right. Uniting around the common good—kids have questions about all of these things they see and hear about each day. Through sparse and lyrical writing, Rob Sanders introduces abstract concepts like “fighting for what you believe in” and turns them into something actionable. Jared Schorr’s bold, bright illustrations brings the resistance to life making it clear that one person can make a difference. And together, we can accomplish anything.

Fighting for Rights

Author: Trish Albert

Publisher: Heinemann Library

ISBN: 9781442509030

Category: Aboriginal Australians

Page: 24

View: 4987

This series explores the histories, cultures and identities of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples. Through different modes of storytelling, the reader will discover the experiences of people from the past and present and also how Indigenous Australians have fought for rights and why they have a unique place in society. Age 8+.

Fighting for Human Rights

Author: Paul Gready

Publisher: Psychology Press

ISBN: 0415312914

Category: Political Science

Page: 198

View: 3862

In a world that is increasingly disillusioned with formal politics, people are no longer prepared to wait for governments and international institutions to act on human rights concerns. This book identifies activism as a key means of realizing human rights and as a new form of politics. Fighting for Human Rights documents and compares successful high profile campaigns to cancel debt in the developing world, ban landmines and set up the International Criminal Court as well as emerging campaigns that focus on HIV/AIDS, environmental justice, democratization and blood diamonds.

Rallying for Immigrant Rights

The Fight for Inclusion in 21st Century America

Author: Kim Voss,Irene Bloemraad

Publisher: Univ of California Press

ISBN: 0520948912

Category: Social Science

Page: 336

View: 2427

From Alaska to Florida, millions of immigrants and their supporters took to the streets across the United States to rally for immigrant rights in the spring of 2006. The scope and size of their protests, rallies, and boycotts made these the most significant events of political activism in the United States since the 1960s. This accessibly written volume offers the first comprehensive analysis of this historic moment. Perfect for students and general readers, its essays, written by a multidisciplinary group of scholars and grassroots organizers, trace the evolution and legacy of the 2006 protest movement in engaging, theoretically informed discussions. The contributors cover topics including unions, churches, the media, immigrant organizations, and immigrant politics. Today, one in eight U.S. residents was born outside the country, but for many, lack of citizenship makes political voice through the ballot box impossible. This book helps us better understand how immigrants are making their voices heard in other ways.

Fighting for Rights

From Holy Wars to Humanitarian Military Interventions

Author: Tal Dingott Alkopher

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 1317135369

Category: Political Science

Page: 224

View: 2156

In the light of NATO's humanitarian war in Kosovo is it possible to understand or explain wars as an outcome of perceptions of rights? How did rights, be they divine rights in the Middle Ages, territorial rights in the eighteenth century, or human rights today, become something that people are willing to fight and die for? To answer these questions, this book explores the linkage between concepts of rights and the practice of war in the international arena. Alkopher describes how normative structures of rights have shaped different practices of war from medieval to modern times, through the lens of social constructivism. From the eleventh to the thirteenth century, concepts of divine rights and institutionalized practices of the Crusades to the Holy Land fostered the prevailing ideas of international rights and war. In the eighteenth century, the institutionalization of states' rights and territorial wars shaped international conflict. This view held until the late twentieth century when the institutionalization of human rights coupled with the emerging practice of humanitarian war, particularly NATO's war in Kosovo, engendered new norms of international conduct. The author concludes that rights have the power to constitute an international order that will be either cooperative or conflictual and the choice of outcome is very much in our hands. This book will be essential reading for international relations and political science scholars and students but also philosophers, legal and sociological historians and international lawyers.

Labour Unionism in the Financial Services Sector

Fighting for Rights and Representation

Author: Gregor Gall

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 1351154389

Category: Business & Economics

Page: 222

View: 2677

In recent years, there has been an acute crisis of worker representation in the finance sector in Britain. Labour union and staff association membership and density has fallen, collective organisation has experienced dislocation and disorganisation and worker self-confidence has been sapped. Prior to this, there was a sense of an identifiable trajectory towards greater 'unionateness' by labour unions and staff associations, with the sector moving towards growing self-identification of employees as 'workers' and the use of traditional tools of collective bargaining such as threats of strikes and strikes themselves. This study documents and explains these changes in wider historical terms, providing invaluable reading for those interested in the future of both the labour movement and the finance sector.

Raymond Pace Alexander

A New Negro Lawyer Fights for Civil Rights in Philadelphia

Author: David A. Canton

Publisher: Univ. Press of Mississippi

ISBN: 9781604734263

Category: Social Science

Page: 272

View: 3148

Raymond Pace Alexander (1897-1974) was a prominent black attorney in Philadelphia and a distinguished member of the National Bar Association, the oldest and largest association of African American lawyers and judges. A contemporary of such nationally known black attorneys as Charles Hamilton Houston, William Hastie, and Thurgood Marshall, Alexander litigated civil rights cases and became well known in Philadelphia. Yet his legacy to the civil rights struggle has received little national recognition. As a New Negro lawyer during the 1930s, Alexander worked with left-wing organizations to desegregate an all-white elementary school in Berwin, Pennsylvania. After World War II, he became an anti-communist liberal and formed coalitions with like-minded whites. In the sixties, Alexander criticized Black Power rhetoric, but shared some philosophies with Black Power such as black political empowerment and studying black history. By the late sixties, he focused on economic justice by advocating a Marshall Plan for poor Americans and supporting affirmative action. Alexander was a major contributor to the northern civil rights struggle and was committed to improving the status of black lawyers. He was representative of a generation who created opportunities for African Americans but was later often ignored or castigated by younger leaders who did not support the tactics of the old guard's pioneers.

The Rights Turn in Conservative Christian Politics

How Abortion Transformed the Culture Wars

Author: Andrew R. Lewis

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

ISBN: 1108285619

Category: Political Science

Page: N.A

View: 4376

The Rights Turn in Conservative Christian Politics documents a recent, fundamental change in American politics with the waning of Christian America. Rather than conservatives emphasizing morality and liberals emphasizing rights, both sides now wield rights arguments as potent weapons to win political and legal battles and build grassroots support. Lewis documents this change on the right, focusing primarily on evangelical politics. Using extensive historical and survey data that compares evangelical advocacy and evangelical public opinion, Lewis explains how the prototypical culture war issue - abortion - motivated the conservative rights turn over the past half century, serving as a springboard for rights learning and increased conservative advocacy in other arenas. Challenging the way we think about the culture wars, Lewis documents how rights claims are used to thwart liberal rights claims, as well as to provide protection for evangelicals, whose cultural positions are increasingly in the minority; they have also allowed evangelical elites to justify controversial advocacy positions to their base and to engage more easily in broad rights claiming in new or expanded political arenas, from health care to capital punishment.

Failure and Hope

Author: Christine Mahoney

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

ISBN: 1107162815

Category: Political Science

Page: 168

View: 6466

In 2015, 60 million people were displaced by violent conflict globally - the highest since World War II. National and international policy prevents the displaced from working or moving freely outside the camps set up to 'temporarily' house them. This policy has left the displaced with no right to work and move while they remain displaced for years, if not decades. Based on data on all 61 protracted displacement crises worldwide, fieldwork in 7 conflict zones around the world, in-depth interviews with over 170 humanitarian aid workers, government officials and refugees, the book systematically details the barriers to effective advocacy at every level of governance and shows that failure is the norm. Unlike many academic monographs, it goes further and proposes an alternative way forward that capitalizes on advances social entrepreneurship, crowd-funding and micro-finance to improve the lives of those that have been forced to flee their homes to find safety.

The Wind in My Hair

My Fight for Freedom in Modern Iran

Author: Masih Alinejad

Publisher: Little, Brown

ISBN: 031654907X

Category: Biography & Autobiography

Page: 400

View: 4054

An extraordinary memoir from an Iranian journalist in exile about leaving her country, challenging tradition and sparking an online movement against compulsory hijab. A photo on Masih's Facebook page: a woman standing proudly, face bare, hair blowing in the wind. Her crime: removing her veil, or hijab, which is compulsory for women in Iran. This is the self-portrait that sparked 'My Stealthy Freedom,' a social media campaign that went viral. But Masih is so much more than the arresting face that sparked a campaign inspiring women to find their voices. She's also a world-class journalist whose personal story, told in her unforgettably bold and spirited voice, is emotional and inspiring. She grew up in a traditional village where her mother, a tailor and respected figure in the community, was the exception to the rule in a culture where women reside in their husbands' shadows. As a teenager, Masih was arrested for political activism and was surprised to discover she was pregnant while in police custody. When she was released, she married quickly and followed her young husband to Tehran where she was later served divorce papers to the shame and embarrassment of her religiously conservative family. Masih spent nine years struggling to regain custody of her beloved only son and was forced into exile, leaving her homeland and her heritage. Following Donald Trump's notorious immigration ban, Masih found herself separated from her child, who lives abroad, once again. A testament to a spirit that remains unbroken, and an enlightening, intimate invitation into a world we don't know nearly enough about, THE WIND IN MY HAIR is the extraordinary memoir of a woman who overcame enormous adversity to fight for what she believes in, and to encourage others to do the same

The unfinished revolution

Voices from the global fight for women's rights

Author: Worden, Minky

Publisher: Policy Press

ISBN: 1447308980

Category: Social Science

Page: 384

View: 6346

CUSTOMERS IN NORTH AMERICA: COPIES ARE AVAILABLE FROM WWW.SEVENSTORIES.COM Women's rights have progressed significantly in the last two decades, but major challenges remain in order to end global gender discrimination. The unfinished revolution: Voices from the global fight for women's rights outlines the recent history of the battle to secure basic rights for women and girls, including in the Middle East where the hopes raised by the Arab Spring are yet to be fulfilled. This anthology opens with a foreword by Christiane Amanpour and features essays by more than 30 writers, activists, policymakers and human rights experts, including Nobel laureates Shirin Ebadi and Jody Williams. Most important are contributions from women who have fought against human rights abuses and have become agents of change. Contributors propose new workable solutions to ongoing rights violations including human trafficking and harmful traditional practices such as child marriage and female genital mutilation. As a whole, the book shows that the struggle for women's equality is far from over and is essential reading for everyone involved in the fight to realise the full potential for half the world's population.

Encyclopedia of Cesar Chavez: The Farm Workers' Fight for Rights and Justice

Author: Roger Bruns

Publisher: ABC-CLIO

ISBN: 1440803811

Category: Social Science

Page: 344

View: 7980

This book is a unique, single-volume treatment offering original source material on the life, accomplishments, disappointments, and lasting legacy of one of American history's most celebrated social reformers—Cesar Chavez. • Presents a unique narrative of the events in the life of Chavez and the Farm Workers Movement, as well as original documents and entries on people and events • Provides a valuable source of information for tracing attitudes, legislation, and progressive reform efforts in the last half-century, especially in light of the current heated debate over immigration • Demonstrates how a determined organizer applied various methods and tactics to accomplish what seemed at the onset of the movement to be a quixotic venture—a relevant lesson for those strategizing to achieve social justice today

Fighting for the Enemy

Koreans in Japan's War, 1937-1945

Author: Brandon Palmer

Publisher: University of Washington Press

ISBN: 0295804602

Category: History

Page: 272

View: 4773

Fighting for the Enemy explores the participation of Koreans in the Japanese military and supporting industries before and during World War II, first through voluntary enlistment and eventually through conscription. Contrary to popular belief among Korean nationalists, this involvement was not entirely coerced. Brandon Palmer examines this ambiguous situation in the context of Japan's long-term colonial effort to assimilate Koreans into Japanese sociopolitical life and documents the many ways Koreans-short of openly resisting-avoided full cooperation with Japanese war efforts. Much media attention has been given to Japan's exploitation of "comfort women" in Korea and elsewhere in East Asia during the colonial period, but, until now, there has been no extended, objective analysis of the exploitation of the thousands of young Korean men who served in Japan's military and auxiliary occupations.

Fighting for Space

How a Group of Drug Users Transformed One City’s Struggle with Addiction

Author: Travis Lupick

Publisher: arsenal pulp press

ISBN: 1551527138

Category: Social Science

Page: 407

View: 5257

North America is in the grips of a drug epidemic; with the introduction of fentanyl, the chances of a fatal overdose are greater than ever, prompting many to rethink the war on drugs. Public opinion has slowly begun to turn against prohibition, and policy-makers are finally beginning to look at addiction as a health issue as opposed to one for the criminal justice system. While deaths across the continent continue to climb, Fighting for Space explains the concept of harm reduction as a crucial component of a city’s response to the drug crisis. It tells the story of a grassroots group of addicts in Vancouver's Downtown Eastside who waged a political street fight for two decades to transform how the city treats its most marginalized citizens. Over the past twenty-five years, this group of residents from Canada's poorest neighborhood organized themselves in response to the growing number of overdose deaths and demanded that addicts be given the same rights as any other citizen; against all odds, they eventually won. But just as their battle came to an end, fentanyl arrived and opioid deaths across North America reached an all-time high. The "genocide" in Vancouver finally sparked government action. Twenty years later, as the same pattern plays out in other cities, there is much that advocates for reform can learn from Vancouver's experience. Fighting for Space tells that story—including case studies in Ohio, Florida, New York, California, Massachusetts, and Washington state—with the same passionate fervor as the activists whose tireless work gave dignity to addicts and saved countless lives.

Pride: The Story of Harvey Milk and the Rainbow Flag

Author: Rob Sanders

Publisher: Random House Books for Young Readers

ISBN: 0399555331

Category: Juvenile Nonfiction

Page: 40

View: 1363

Celebrate the 40th anniversary of the Rainbow Pride Flag with the very first picture book to tell its remarkable and inspiring history! In this deeply moving and empowering true story, young readers will trace the life of the Gay Pride Flag, from its beginnings in 1978 with social activist Harvey Milk and designer Gilbert Baker to its spanning of the globe and its role in today's world. Award-winning author Rob Sanders's stirring text, and acclaimed illustrator Steven Salerno's evocative images, combine to tell this remarkable - and undertold - story. A story of love, hope, equality, and pride. PRAISE FOR PRIDE! A Junior Library Guild Selection "Pride is a beacon of (technicolor) light." - Entertainment Weekly "An essential LGBTQ children's book" - Out.com "This children’s book about gay Pride should be in every school." - Gay Times Magazine "The picture book about Harvey Milk and the Rainbow Flag is everything you needed as a kid." - LGBTQ Nation "I couldn’t be more thrilled the world now has this book." - Dustin Lance Black, Academy Award-winning screenwriter of MILK "This inspiring, positive story is a great introduction to two LGBTQ heroes and to the spirit of the LGBTQ community." - Pridesource.com "A welcome social history . . . Mission accomplished." - The San Francisco Chronicle "A children’s book that will properly express the struggle and joys that the LGBTQ rights movement went through." - Instinct Magazine ★ "Offers little ones an age-appropriate introduction . . . Ebullient . . ." - Shelf Awareness, starred review "An uplifting introduction to the symbol of the Rainbow Flag . . . Vibrant and lively . . . Recommended for all collections." - School Library Journal "A biography LGBTQ rights activists and allies can proudly share with children . . . A hope-filled ode to the rainbow flag." - Kirkus Reviews "A poignant and uplifting biography." - Publisher's Weekly "A tribute to a leader undertreated in young people’s literature." -The Bulletin of the Center For Children’s Books "Salerno’s strong art has a colorful seventies vibe . . . There is value here." - Booklist "Pride: The Story of Harvey Milk and The Rainbow Flag beautifully tells the history of both Uncle Harvey's dream and his collaboration with Gilbert Baker to create a global symbol of equality and inclusion. This book tells a history that all children will cherish, and will inspire the next generation of hope givers, our world's youth" - Stuart Milk, Founder and President of the Harvey Milk Foundation “Harvey Milk and Gilbert Baker showed LGBTQ people that they should be proud of who they are and who they love. That is exactly what we do at The Trevor Project for LGBTQ youth in crisis. We’re thrilled that more young people will learn the story behind the original rainbow flag.” - Amit Paley, Trevor Project CEO and Executive Director

Rodzilla

Author: Rob Sanders

Publisher: Simon and Schuster

ISBN: 1481457802

Category: Juvenile Fiction

Page: 48

View: 3052

This just in! There’s a Rodzilla on the loose! Is he a monster…or just your typical toddler? Tune in for the full report in this riotous picture book from Rob Sanders and Caldecott Medalist Dan Santat. Rodzilla is the mightiest toddler to ever roam the streets of the city. Marvel at the sight of his chubby monstrosity. Gaze at his toothless grin. Take a whiff of his…no, don’t do that. Only a mother could love such a creature. Rodzilla is taking over the city (that is really his playpen) and causing all sorts of chaos for its inhabitants (um, his parents). Can he be stopped before he toddles one step too far? Told as an action-packed news report, kids will love following Rodzilla on his mighty tear through the city, and ultimately back to his parents’ arms. Because sometimes even monsters need a little help.

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