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Fighting for Status

Hierarchy and Conflict in World Politics

Author: Jonathan Renshon

Publisher: Princeton University Press

ISBN:

Category: Political Science

Page: 328

View: 412

There is widespread agreement that status or standing in the international system is a critical element in world politics. The desire for status is recognized as a key factor in nuclear proliferation, the rise of China, and other contemporary foreign policy issues, and has long been implicated in foundational theories of international relations and foreign policy. Despite the consensus that status matters, we lack a basic understanding of status dynamics in international politics. The first book to comprehensively examine this subject, Fighting for Status presents a theory of status dissatisfaction that delves into the nature of prestige in international conflicts and specifies why states want status and how they get it. What actions do status concerns trigger, and what strategies do states use to maximize or salvage their standing? When does status matter, and under what circumstances do concerns over relative position overshadow the myriad other concerns that leaders face? In examining these questions, Jonathan Renshon moves beyond a focus on major powers and shows how different states construct status communities of peer competitors that shift over time as states move up or down, or out, of various groups. Combining innovative network-based statistical analysis, historical case studies, and a lab experiment that uses a sample of real-world political and military leaders, Fighting for Status provides a compelling look at the causes and consequences of status on the global stage.

Who Fights for Reputation

The Psychology of Leaders in International Conflict

Author: Keren Yarhi-Milo

Publisher: Princeton University Press

ISBN:

Category: Political Science

Page: 344

View: 294

How psychology explains why a leader is willing to use military force to protect or salvage reputation In Who Fights for Reputation, Keren Yarhi-Milo provides an original framework, based on insights from psychology, to explain why some political leaders are more willing to use military force to defend their reputation than others. Rather than focusing on a leader's background, beliefs, bargaining skills, or biases, Yarhi-Milo draws a systematic link between a trait called self-monitoring and foreign policy behavior. She examines self-monitoring among national leaders and advisers and shows that while high self-monitors modify their behavior strategically to cultivate image-enhancing status, low self-monitors are less likely to change their behavior in response to reputation concerns. Exploring self-monitoring through case studies of foreign policy crises during the terms of U.S. presidents Carter, Reagan, and Clinton, Yarhi-Milo disproves the notion that hawks are always more likely than doves to fight for reputation. Instead, Yarhi-Milo demonstrates that a decision maker's propensity for impression management is directly associated with the use of force to restore a reputation for resolve on the international stage. Who Fights for Reputation offers a brand-new understanding of the pivotal influence that psychological factors have on political leadership, military engagement, and the protection of public prestige.

Quest for Status

Chinese and Russian Foreign Policy

Author: Deborah Welch Larson

Publisher: Yale University Press

ISBN:

Category: Political Science

Page: 352

View: 196

A look at how the desire to improve international status affects Russia's and China's foreign policies Deborah Welch Larson and Alexei Shevchenko argue that the desire for world status plays a key role in shaping the foreign policies of China and Russia. Applying social identity theory—the idea that individuals derive part of their identity from larger communities—to nations, they contend that China and Russia have used various modes of emulation, competition, and creativity to gain recognition from other countries and thus validate their respective identities. To make this argument, they analyze numerous cases, including Catherine the Great’s attempts to westernize Russia, China’s identity crises in the nineteenth century, and both countries’ responses to the end of the Cold War. The authors employ a multifaceted method of measuring status, factoring in influence and inclusion in multinational organizations, military clout, and cultural sway, among other considerations. Combined with historical precedent, this socio-psychological approach helps explain current trends in Russian and Chinese foreign policy.

Why We Fight

Author: Mike Martin

Publisher: Oxford University Press

ISBN:

Category: Social Science

Page: 311

View: 302

"Why are we willing to die for our countries? How can ideology persuade someone to blow themselves up? When we go to war, morality, religion and ideology often take the blame. But Mike Martin boldly argues that the opposite is true: rather than driving violence, these things help to reduce it. While we resort to ideas and values to justify or interpret warfare, something else is really propelling us towards conflict: our subconscious desires, shaped by millions of years of evolution.

Spiritual Perversion

Author: Steve Sanchez

Publisher: Steve Sanchez

ISBN:

Category: Biography & Autobiography

Page: 432

View: 480

Sanchez gives raw and honest insight into why he was vulnerable to the mind control of a cult. He describes how he recovered psychologically, financially, and spiritually, as well as how he rescued his daughter from the cult who brainwashed her against him.

The Competition Paradigm

America's Romance with Conflict, Contest, and Commerce

Author: Pauline Vaillancourt Rosenau

Publisher: Rowman & Littlefield

ISBN:

Category: Social Science

Page: 237

View: 876

This insightful book explores the question of competition and effects it has on individuals, organizations, and society as a whole. Visit our website for sample chapters!

An American Dilemma, Volume 1

The Negro Problem and Modern Democracy

Author: Gunnar Myrdal

Publisher: Transaction Publishers

ISBN:

Category: Social Science

Page: 812

View: 731

This landmark effort to understand African-American people in the New World provides deep insight into the contradictions of American democracy as well as a study of a people within a people. The touchstone of this classic is the jarring discrepancy between the American creed of respect for the inalienable rights to freedom, justice, and opportunity for all and the pervasive violations of the dignity of blacks.

China's Struggle for Status

The Realignment of International Relations

Author: Yong Deng

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

ISBN:

Category: Political Science

Page:

View: 862

At the end of the Cold War the People's Republic of China found itself in an international crisis, facing severe problems in both domestic politics and foreign policy. Nearly two decades later, Yong Deng provides an original account of China's remarkable rise from the periphery to the center stage of the post-Cold War world. Deng examines how the once beleaguered country has adapted to, and proactively realigned, the international hierarchy, great-power politics, and its regional and global environment in order to carve out an international path within the globalized world. Creatively engaging with mainstream international relations theories and drawing extensively from original Chinese material, this is a well-grounded assessment of the promises and challenges of China's struggle to manage the interlacing of its domestic and international transitions and the interactive process between its rise and evolving world politics.

Duck

Author: Victoria de Rijke

Publisher: Reaktion Books

ISBN:

Category: Nature

Page: 224

View: 411

The squat, noisy duck occupies a prominent role in the human cultural imagination, as evidenced by everything from the rubber duck of childhood baths to insurance commercials. With Duck,Victoria de Rijke explores the universality of this quacking bird through the course of human culture and history. From the Eider duck to the Brazilian teal to the familiar mallard, duck species are richly diverse, and de Rijke offers a comprehensive overview of their evolutionary history. She explores the numerous roles that the duck plays in literature, art, and religion—including the Hebrew belief that ducks represent immortality, and the Finnish myth that the universe was hatched from a duck’s egg. The author also highlights the significant role humor has always played in human imaginings of duck life, such as the Topographia Hibernia, a twelfth-century tome contending that ducks originated as growths on tree trunks washed up on a beach. But the book does not neglect the bird’s role in everyday life as well, from food dishes to jokes to beloved animated characters such as Daffy Duck and Donald Duck. Duck is an entertaining account of a bird whose distinctive silhouette is known the world over.

My Three Mothers and Other Passions

Author: Sophie Freud

Publisher: NYU Press

ISBN:

Category: Psychology

Page: 372

View: 644

Sophie Freud— author, teacher, social worker, mother, daughter, and grand-daughter of Sigmund Freud—here offers, for the first time, a candid portrait of her struggles in her own life. Blessed and cursed with the legacy of a famous family, Dr. Freud has negotiated her way from a blissful childhood in Vienna, to Paris, to Radcliff College, to her present-day life as on one of the most respected teachers in her field. My Three Mothers and Other Passions is a remarkable story about a remarkable woman, and Dr. Freud explores with us openly and engagingly the many experiences of her life.

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