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Fundamental Rights in Europe

Author: Federico Fabbrini

Publisher: Oxford University Press

ISBN:

Category: Law

Page: 319

View: 280

The European architecture for the protection of fundamental rights combines the legal regimes of the states, the European Union, and the European Convention on Human Rights. The purpose of this book is to analyse the constitutional implications of this multilevel architecture and to examine the dynamics that spring from the interaction between different human rights standards in Europe. The book adopts a comparative approach, and through a comparison with the federal system of the United States, it advances an analytical model that systematically explains the dynamics at play in the European multilevel human rights architecture. It identifies two recurrent challenges in the interplay between different state and transnational human rights standards - a challenge of ineffectiveness, when transnational law operates as a ceiling of protection for a specific human right, and a challenge of inconsistency when transnational law operates as a floor - and considers the most recenttransformations taking place in the European human rights regime. The book tests the model of challenges and transformations by examining in depth four case studies: the right to due process for suspected terrorists, the right to vote for non-citizens, the right to strike and the right to abortion. In light of these examples, the book then concludes by reassessing the main theories on the protection of fundamental rights in Europe and making the case for a new vision - a "neo-federal" theory - which is able to frame the dilemmas of identity, equality and supremacy behind the European multilevel architecture for the protection of human rights.

The Protection of Fundamental Rights in the EU After Lisbon

Author: Sybe de Vries

Publisher: Bloomsbury Publishing

ISBN:

Category: Law

Page: 246

View: 181

The changes made by the Lisbon Treaty suggest that its entry into force in December 2009 marks a new stage in the shaping of the EU's commitment to the protection of fundamental rights. This book's concern is to provide an examination of the several (and interlocking) challenges which the Lisbon reforms present. The book will not only address the fresh and intriguing challenges for the EU as an entity committed to the protection and promotion of fundamental rights presented by developments 'post-Lisbon', but also a number of conundrums about the scope and method of protection of fundamental rights in the EU which existed 'pre-Lisbon' and which endure. The book consists of three parts. The first part is concerned with the safeguarding of fundamental rights in Europe's internal market. The second part of the book is entitled 'The Scope of Fundamental Rights in EU Law' and the chapters discuss the reach of fundamental rights and their horizontal dimension. The last part of this book deals with 'The Constitutional Dimension of Fundamental Rights' analysing the special relationship between the ECJ and the ECtHR and the issue of rights competition between the EU Charter on Fundamental Rights, the European Convention on Human Rights and national rights catalogues.

National Identity in EU Law

Author: Elke Cloots

Publisher: OUP Oxford

ISBN:

Category: Law

Page: 414

View: 675

Despite nearly sixty years of European integration, neither nations nor national loyalties have withered away. On the contrary, national identity rhetoric seems on the rise, not only in politics but also in legal discourse. Lately we have seen a rise in the number of Member States invoking their national identity in an attempt to justify a derogation from a requirement imposed on them by a Treaty article or an EU legislative act, or to legitimize a particular national reading of such an EU norm. Despite this, the European Court of Justice (ECJ) has yet to develop a coherent approach to such arguments, or express a vision of the role national identity should play in EU law. Elke Cloots undertakes this task by providing a principled and coherent scheme for the adjudication of disputes involving claims based on the national identity of a Member State. Should arguments involving national identity be legally relevant? If yes, how should the ECJ approach such identity-related interests? Cloots crafts a normative framework to assist the ECJ in striking the right balance between European integration and respect for the identity concerns at issue. The book combines rigorous theoretical inquiry with thorough analysis of the European Treaties and case law, with particular attention paid to litigation involving domestic measures concerning the national system of government, constitutional rights protections, and language policy. Clarifying the issues at stake and presenting a solution to these problems, this book will be an invaluable resource for the academics, lawyers, and policy makers in the field.

Fundamental Rights in Europe

The European Convention on Human Rights and Its Member States, 1950-2000

Author: Robert Blackburn

Publisher: Courier Corporation

ISBN:

Category: Political Science

Page: 1061

View: 305

This book looks at the European Convention on Human Rights and examines its impact on the domestic law of 32 of its member states. The most comprehensive account of this topic, this volume was prepared in association with the Council of Europe directorate of human rights to commemorate the 50th anniversary of the signing of the Convention in 1950.

Normative Patterns and Legal Developments in the Social Dimension of the EU

Author: Ann Numhauser-Henning

Publisher: Bloomsbury Publishing

ISBN:

Category: Law

Page: 282

View: 398

This book explores the normative and legal evolution of the Social Dimension - labour law, social security law and family law - in both the EU and its Member States, during the last decade. It does this from a wide range of theoretical and legal-substantive perspectives. The past decade has witnessed the entering into force of the Lisbon Treaty and its emphasis on fundamental rights, a new coordination regulation within the field of social security (Regulation 883/2004/EC), and the case law of the Court of Justice of the European Union in the so-called Laval Quartet. Furthermore structural changes affecting demographics and family have also challenged solidarity in new ways. The book is organised by reference to distinct 'normative patterns' and their development in the fields of law covered, such as the protection of established groups, the position of market functional values and the scope for just distribution. The book represents an innovative and important interdisciplinary approach to analysing EU law and Social Europe, and contributes a complex, yet thought-provoking, picture for the future. The contributors represent an interesting mix of well-known and distinguished as well as upcoming and promising researchers throughout Europe and beyond.

EU Equality Law

The First Fundamental Rights Policy of the EU

Author: ELISE. MUIR

Publisher:

ISBN:

Category:

Page: 256

View: 464

The focus of this monograph is on the evolution of EU policies designed to realize specific fundamental rights, and how this is delivered in EU equality law.

Social Rights in Europe

Author: Gráinne De Búrca

Publisher: Oxford University Press on Demand

ISBN:

Category: Political Science

Page: 421

View: 242

"This volume of essays originates in a conference organized by the Academy of European Law at the European University Institute in Florence"--Preface.

The Human Rights of Migrants in European Law

Author: Cathryn Costello

Publisher: Oxford University Press

ISBN:

Category: Law

Page: 350

View: 770

A critical discussion of EU and ECHR migration and refugee law, this book analyses the law on asylum and immigration of third country-nationals. It focuses on how the EU norms interact with ECHR human rights case law on migration, and the pitfalls of European human rights pluralism.

EU Counter-Terrorist Policies and Fundamental Rights

The Case of Individual Sanctions

Author: Christina Eckes

Publisher: Oxford University Press

ISBN:

Category: Law

Page: 478

View: 634

This book examines the complex legal issues arising from the European Union's practice of listing and sanctioning private individuals for having supported terrorism. These 'individual sanctions' (asset freezes and travel bans) are adopted pursuant to the same composite procedure that is used for sanctions against states. This raises problems with regard to the protection of procedural rights and the competence division within the EU. Moreover, some of thesemeasures directly give effect to United Nations lists of terrorist suspects. This makes it necessary to determine the status and binding force of obligations under the UN Charter within the European legal order. The core of this book is a comprehensive analysis of the growing body of case-law ofthe European Courts concerning individual sanctions. The analysis focuses on three main issues: fundamental rights protection in the fight against the financing of terrorism, the relationship between the European legal order and the UN Charter...

Human Rights Law in Europe

The Influence, Overlaps and Contradictions of the EU and the ECHR

Author: Kanstantsin Dzehtsiarou

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN:

Category: Law

Page: 248

View: 533

This book provides analysis and critique of the dual protection of human rights in Europe by assessing the developing legal relationship between the Court of Justice of the European Union (CJEU) and the European Court of Human Rights (ECtHR). The book offers a comprehensive consideration of the institutional framework, adjudicatory approaches, and the protection of material rights within the law of the European Union and the European Convention on Human Rights (ECHR). It particularly explores the involvement and participation of stakeholders in the functioning of the EU and the ECtHR, and asks how well the new legal model of ‘the EU under the ECtHR’ compares to current EU law, the ECHR and general international law. Including contributions from leading scholars in the field, each chapter sets out specific case-studies that illustrate the tensions and synergies emergent from the EU-ECHR relationship. In so doing, the book highlights the overlap and dialectic between Europe’s two primary international courts. The book will be of great interest to students and researchers of European Law and Human Rights.

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