Search Results: further-adventures-of-the-celestial-sleuth-using-astronomy-to-solve-more-mysteries-in-art-history-and-literature-springer-praxis-books

Further Adventures of the Celestial Sleuth

Using Astronomy to Solve More Mysteries in Art, History, and Literature

Author: Donald W. Olson

Publisher: Springer

ISBN: 331970320X

Category: Science

Page: 334

View: 9863

From the author of "Celestial Sleuth" (2014), yet more mysteries in art, history, and literature are solved by calculating phases of the Moon, determining the positions of the planets and stars, and identifying celestial objects in paintings. In addition to helping to crack difficult cases, these studies spark our imagination and provide a better understanding of the skies. Weather archives, vintage maps, tides, historical letters and diaries, military records and the assistance of experts in related fields help with this work. For each historical event influenced by astronomy, there is a different kind of mystery to be solved. How did the changing tides affect an army's battle plans? How did the phases of the moon affect how an artist painted a landscape? Follow these exciting investigations with a master “celestial sleuth” as he tracks down the truth and helps unravel mysteries as far back as the Middle Ages and as recent as the iconic 1945 photograph of a kiss in Times Square on VJ Day. Topics or "cases" pursued were chosen for their wide public recognition and intrigue and involve artists such as Vincent van Gogh and Claude Monet; historical events such as the campaigns of Braveheart in Scotland and battles in World War II and the Korean War; and literary authors such as Chaucer, Cervantes, Shakespeare, Byron, and Edgar Allan Poe.

Celestial Sleuth

Using Astronomy to Solve Mysteries in Art, History and Literature

Author: Donald W. Olson

Publisher: Springer Science & Business Media

ISBN: 1461484030

Category: Science

Page: 355

View: 8444

For a general audience interested in solving mysteries in art, history, and literature using the methods of science, 'forensic astronomy' is a thrilling new field of exploration. Astronomical calculations are the basis of the studies, which have the advantage of bringing to readers both evocative images and a better understanding of the skies. Weather facts, volcano studies, topography, tides, historical letters and diaries, famous paintings, military records, and the friendly assistance of experts in related fields add variety, depth, and interest to the work. The chosen topics are selected for their wide public recognition and intrigue, involving artists such as Vincent van Gogh, Claude Monet, Edvard Munch, and Ansel Adams; historical events such as the Battle of Marathon, the death of Julius Caesar, the American Revolution, and World War II; and literary authors such as Chaucer, Shakespeare, Joyce, and Mary Shelley. This book sets out to answer these mysteries indicated with the means and expertise of astronomy, opening the door to a richer experience of human culture and its relationship with nature. Each subject is carefully analyzed. As an example using the study of sky paintings by Vincent van Gogh, the analytical method would include: - computer calculations of historical skies above France in the 19th century - finding and quoting the clues found in translations of original letters by Van Gogh - making site visits to France to determine the precise locations when Van Gogh set up his easel and what celestial objects are depicted. For each historical event influenced by astronomy, there would be a different kind of mystery to be solved. As an example: - How can the phase of the Moon and time of moonrise help to explain a turning point of the American Civil War - the fatal wounding of Stonewall Jackson at Chancellorsville in 1863? For each literary reference to astronomy, it was determined which celestial objects were being described and making an argument that the author is describing an actual event. For example, what was the date of the moonlit scene when Mary Shelley first had the idea for her novel “Frankenstein?” These and more fun riddles will enchant and delight the fan of art and astronomy.

Deep Life

The Hunt for the Hidden Biology of Earth, Mars, and Beyond

Author: Tullis C. Onstott

Publisher: Princeton University Press

ISBN: 1400884241

Category: Science

Page: 512

View: 6132

Deep Life takes readers to uncharted regions deep beneath Earth's crust in search of life in extreme environments and reveals how astonishing new discoveries by geomicrobiologists are helping the quest to find life in the solar system. Tullis Onstott, named one of the 100 most influential people in America by Time magazine, provides an insider’s look at the pioneering fieldwork that is shining vital new light on Earth’s hidden biology—a thriving subterranean biosphere that scientists once thought to be impossible. Come along on epic descents two miles underground into South African gold mines to experience the challenges that Onstott and his team had to overcome. Join them in their search for microbes in the ancient seabed below the desert floor in the American Southwest, and travel deep beneath the frozen wastelands of the Arctic tundra to discover life as it could exist on Mars. Blending cutting-edge science with thrilling scientific adventure, Deep Life features rare and unusual encounters with exotic life forms, including a bacterium living off radiation and a hermaphroditic troglodytic worm that has changed our understanding of how complex subsurface life can really be. This unforgettable book takes you to the absolute limits of life—the biotic fringe—where today’s scientists hope to discover the very origins of life itself.

The People's Doctors

Samuel Thomson and the American Botanical Movement, 1790-1860

Author: John S. Haller

Publisher: SIU Press

ISBN: 9780809323395

Category: Health & Fitness

Page: 377

View: 3899

Samuel Thomson, born in New Hampshire in 1769 to an illiterate farming family, had no formal education, but he learned the elements of botanical medicine from a "root doctor," who he met in his youth. Thomson sought to release patients from the harsh bleeding or purging regimens of regular physicians by offering inexpensive and gentle medicines from their own fields and gardens. He melded his followers into a militant corps of dedicated believers, using them to successfully lobby state legislatures to pass medical acts favorable to their cause. John S. Haller Jr. points out that Thomson began his studies by ministering to his own family. He started his professional career as an itinerant healer traveling a circuit among the small towns and villages of Maine, New Hampshire, and Massachusetts. Eventually, he transformed his medical practice into a successful business enterprise with agents selling several hundred thousand rights or franchises to his system. His popular New Guide to Health (1822) went through thirteen editions, including one in German, and countless thousands were reprinted without permission. Told here for the first time, Haller's history of Thomsonism recounts the division within this American medical sect in the last century. While many Thomsonians displayed a powerful, vested interest in anti-intellectualism, a growing number found respectability through the establishment of medical colleges and a certified profession of botanical doctors. The People's Doctors covers seventy years, from 1790, when Thomson began his practice on his own family, until 1860, when much of Thomson's medical domain had been captured by the more liberal Eclectics. Eighteen halftones illustrate this volume.

Performance and Place

Author: L. Hill,H. Paris

Publisher: Springer

ISBN: 0230597726

Category: Performing Arts

Page: 275

View: 8462

Written by both practitioners and scholars, this significant and timely collection explores the sites of contemporary performance, and the notion of place. The volume examines how we experience performance's varied sites as part of the fabric of the art work itself, whether they are institutional or transient, real or online.

Clearcutting the Pacific Rain Forest

Production, Science, and Regulation

Author: Richard A. Rajala

Publisher: UBC Press

ISBN: 0774842237

Category: Nature

Page: 312

View: 5424

This book integrates class, environmental, and political analysis to uncover the history of clearcutting in the Douglas fir forests of B.C., Washington, and Oregon between 1880 and 1965. Part I focuses on the mode of production, analyzing the technological and managerial structures of worker and resource exploitation from the perspective of current trends in labour process research. Rajala argues that operators sought to neutralize the variable forest environment by emulating the factory model of work organization. The introduction of steam-powered overhead logging methods provided industry with a rudimentary factory regime by 1930, accompanied by productivity gains and diminished workplace autonomy for loggers. After a Depression-inspired turn to selective logging with caterpillar tractors timber capital continued its refinement of clearcutting technologies in the post-war period, achieving complete mechanization of yarding with the automatic grapple. Driviing this process of innovation was a concept of industrial efficiency that responded to changing environmental conditions, product and labour markets, but sought to advance operators' class interests by routinizing production. The managerial component of the factory regime took shape in accordance with the principles of the early 20th century scientific management movement. Requiring expertise in the organization of an expanded, technologically sophisticated exploitation process, operators presided over the establishment of logging engineering programs in the region's universities. Graduates introduced rational planning procedures to coastal logging, contributing to a rate of deforestation that generated a corporate call for technical forestry expertise after 1930. Industrial foresters then emerged from the universities to provide firms with data needed for long-range investment decisions in land acquisition and management. Part II constitutes an environmental and political history of clearcutting. This reconstructs the process of scientific research concenring the factory regime's impact on the ecology of the Douglas fir forest, assessing how knowledge was utitized in the regulation of cutting practices. Analysis of business-government relations in British Columbia, Washington and Oregon suggests that the reliance of those client states on revenues generated by timber capital enouraged a pattern of regulation that served corporate rather than social and ecological ends.

Digital Delirium

Author: Arthur Kroker,Marilouise Kroker

Publisher: Palgrave Macmillan

ISBN: 9780312172374

Category: Literary Collections

Page: 318

View: 7610

Digital Delirium is a manifest against the right-wing politics of cyberlibertarianism and for rewiring the question of ethics to digital reality. Bringing together the most creative minds of the digital generation, it explores what is lost and what is gained by being digital.

Ansel Adams

The National Park Service Photographs

Author: Ansel Adams

Publisher: Abbeville Press

ISBN: 9780789208224

Category: Photography

Page: 144

View: 8311

In 1941, Ansel Adams was hired by the United States Department of the Interior to photograph America's national parks for a series of murals that would celebrate the country's natural heritage.

Limiting Outer Space

Astroculture After Apollo

Author: Alexander C.T. Geppert

Publisher: Springer

ISBN: 1137369167

Category: Science

Page: 367

View: 6822

Limiting Outer Space propels the historicization of outer space by focusing on the Post-Apollo period. After the moon landings, disillusionment set in. Outer space, no longer considered the inevitable destination of human expansion, lost much of its popular appeal, cultural significance and political urgency. With the rapid waning of the worldwide Apollo frenzy, the optimism of the Space Age gave way to an era of space fatigue and planetized limits. Bringing together the history of European astroculture and American-Soviet spaceflight with scholarship on the 1970s, this cutting-edge volume examines the reconfiguration of space imaginaries from a multiplicity of disciplinary perspectives. Rather than invoking oft-repeated narratives of Cold War rivalry and an escalating Space Race, Limiting Outer Space breaks new ground by exploring a hitherto underrated and understudied decade, the Post-Apollo period.

Other Planets

The Complete Works of Karlheinz Stockhausen 1950–2007

Author: Robin Maconie

Publisher: Rowman & Littlefield

ISBN: 1442272686

Category: Music

Page: 598

View: 2010

German composer Karlheinz Stockhausen was arguably the most influential figure of the European postwar avant-garde and unquestionably the most elusive and enigmatic musical thinker of a generation that includes Pierre Boulez, John Cage, and Luciano Berio. His radically new electronic and instrumental music converted Igor Stravinsky to serialism in the 1950s and has continued to inspire young composers for more than fifty years. Other Planets: The Complete Works of Karlheinz Stockhausen, 1950–2007 draws on more than fifty years of Maconie’s close study of Stockhausen and functions as a catalogue raisonee of Stockhausen’s complete output. With plentiful citations from the history of radio, film, and sound recording, as well as from contemporary science and technology, the book is laid out in chronological order and contains ample commentary on the composer’s sources of inspiration. Each composition is also fully documented within the text, giving full information of each work’s publisher, catalog number, instrumentation, duration, and authorized compact disc. The updated edition extends the range of the volume’s contents to include the twenty-five works Stockhausen composed between 2004 and his death in 2007. Stockhausen’s status in the history of music in the late twentieth century can now be appreciated with unprecedented clarity. All listeners will benefit from this work, and American music lovers in particular will find it an invaluable guide to the ongoing debate and rivalry over the sources of abstract expressionism and the avant-garde.

Space Physiology and Medicine

From Evidence to Practice

Author: Arnauld E. Nicogossian,Richard S. Williams,Carolyn L. Huntoon,Charles R. Doarn,James D. Polk,Victor S. Schneider

Publisher: Springer

ISBN: 1493966529

Category: Medical

Page: 509

View: 9416

As space medicine evolved from the late 1950s onward, the need arose for a ready reference for students and practitioners on the basic concepts of this new specialty. Through three editions edited by leaders in the development of space medicine, this classic text has met the need. This fourth edition of Space Physiology and Medicine provides succinct, evidence-based summaries of the current knowledge base in space medicine and serves as a source of information on the space environment, responses, and practices. Additionally, there is extensive online material available for each chapter, featuring overviews and self-study questions.

Astronomy Across Cultures

The History of Non-Western Astronomy

Author: Helaine Selin

Publisher: Springer Science & Business Media

ISBN: 9401141797

Category: Science

Page: 665

View: 7796

Astronomy Across Cultures: A History of Non-Western Astronomy consists of essays dealing with the astronomical knowledge and beliefs of cultures outside the United States and Europe. In addition to articles surveying Islamic, Chinese, Native American, Aboriginal Australian, Polynesian, Egyptian and Tibetan astronomy, among others, the book includes essays on Sky Tales and Why We Tell Them and Astronomy and Prehistory, and Astronomy and Astrology. The essays address the connections between science and culture and relate astronomical practices to the cultures which produced them. Each essay is well illustrated and contains an extensive bibliography. Because the geographic range is global, the book fills a gap in both the history of science and in cultural studies. It should find a place on the bookshelves of advanced undergraduate students, graduate students, and scholars, as well as in libraries serving those groups.

Scientific and Medical Writings in Old and Middle English

An Electronic Reference

Author: Linda Ehrsam Voigts,Patricia Deery Kurtz

Publisher: N.A

ISBN: 9780472002795

Category: History

Page: N.A

View: 6597

A valuable electronic reference for medieval manuscripts

Shaping Biology

The National Science Foundation and American Biological Research, 1945-1975

Author: Toby A. Appel

Publisher: JHU Press

ISBN: 0801873479

Category: Science

Page: 408

View: 9377

Historians of the postwar transformation of science have focused largely on the physical sciences, especially the relation of science to the military funding agencies. In Shaping Biology, Toby A. Appel brings attention to the National Science Foundation and federal patronage of the biological sciences. Scientists by training, NSF biologists hoped in the 1950s that the new agency would become the federal government's chief patron for basic research in biology, the only agency to fund the entire range of biology—from molecules to natural history museums—for its own sake. Appel traces how this vision emerged and developed over the next two and a half decades, from the activities of NSF's Division of Biological and Medical Sciences, founded in 1952, through the cold war expansion of the 1950s and 1960s and the constraints of the Vietnam War era, to its reorganization out of existence in 1975. This history of NSF highlights fundamental tensions in science policy that remain relevant today: the pull between basic and applied science; funding individuals versus funding departments or institutions; elitism versus distributive policies of funding; issues of red tape and accountability. In this NSF-funded study, Appel explores how the agency developed, how it worked, and what difference it made in shaping modern biology in the United States. Based on formerly untapped archival sources as well as on interviews of participants, and building upon prior historical literature, Shaping Biology covers new ground and raises significant issues for further research on postwar biology and on federal funding of science in general. -- Margaret RossiterCornell University, author of Women Scientists in America: Before Affirmative Action, 1940-1972

Jefferson and the Indians

The Tragic Fate of the First Americans

Author: Anthony F C Wallace

Publisher: Harvard University Press

ISBN: 9780674044807

Category: Biography & Autobiography

Page: 416

View: 7174

In Thomas Jefferson's time, white Americans were bedeviled by a moral dilemma unyielding to reason and sentiment: what to do about the presence of black slaves and free Indians. That Jefferson himself was caught between his own soaring rhetoric and private behavior toward blacks has long been known. But the tortured duality of his attitude toward Indians is only now being unearthed. In this landmark history, Anthony Wallace takes us on a tour of discovery to unexplored regions of Jefferson's mind. There, the bookish Enlightenment scholar--collector of Indian vocabularies, excavator of ancient burial mounds, chronicler of the eloquence of America's native peoples, and mourner of their tragic fate--sits uncomfortably close to Jefferson the imperialist and architect of Indian removal. Impelled by the necessity of expanding his agrarian republic, he became adept at putting a philosophical gloss on his policy of encroachment, threats of war, and forced land cessions--a policy that led, eventually, to cultural genocide. In this compelling narrative, we see how Jefferson's close relationships with frontier fighters and Indian agents, land speculators and intrepid explorers, European travelers, missionary scholars, and the chiefs of many Indian nations all complicated his views of the rights and claims of the first Americans. Lavishly illustrated with scenes and portraits from the period, "Jefferson and the Indians" adds a troubled dimension to one of the most enigmatic figures of American history, and to one of its most shameful legacies.

Crossing Borders, Crossing Boundaries

The Role of Scientists in the U.S. Acid Rain Debate

Author: Leslie R. Alm

Publisher: Greenwood Publishing Group

ISBN: 9780275969165

Category: Nature

Page: 147

View: 5093

Alm provides an analysis of the science-policy linkage that defined the acid rain debate in the United States. In-depth interviews of scientists illustrate the problems that scientists have in connecting to the policy side of environmental debates.

Young Humphry Davy

The Making of an Experimental Chemist

Author: June Z. Fullmer

Publisher: American Philosophical Society

ISBN: 9780871692375

Category: Biography & Autobiography

Page: 385

View: 9331

Continental Drift

Colliding Continents, Converging Cultures

Author: Constantin Roman

Publisher: CRC Press

ISBN: 9780750306867

Category: Science

Page: 228

View: 5349

Continental Drift: Colliding Continents, Converging Cultures is as much an account of the impressions Western culture made on Constantin Roman as a young researcher from behind the Iron Curtain as a personal history of the developing new science of plate tectonics. The book elucidates the author's struggles against a web of bureaucracy to secure his rights in the free world while exploring historical events. A refined observer of the contrast of cultures between East and West, Roman's personal story relates his encounters with eminent scientists, artists, and embassy officials. Constantin Roman defied communist restrictions by coming to England in 1968 on a NATO travel grant. After being encouraged by Keith Runcorn at the University of Newcastle to stay in Britain for a higher degree, he received a Ph.D. scholarship at the University of Cambridge. This is where he studied under Sir Edward Bullard when plate tectonics was in its infancy, when the concepts of continental drift and sea floor spreading were galvanizing geology. As a continental student adrift on English shores, Roman soon staked his claim on the plate tectonics map with his work on the deep earthquakes of the Carpathians. But the stakes became higher with a race against the clock to be the first to publish a plate tectonics solution to the Himalayan earthquakes. Continental Drift delves into all of this and more. It will delight earth scientists, physicists, and general readers as well as historians of science, who will find a wealth of personal recollections of key figures in the continental drift story.

The Birth of Time

How Astronomers Measured the Age of the Universe

Author: John Gribbin

Publisher: Yale University Press

ISBN: 9780300089141

Category: Science

Page: 256

View: 3347

Recent breakthroughs in measuring the age of the universe with the Hubble Space Telescope are the subject of this book, written by a science writer who was a research astronomer involved in the discoveries. Illustrations.

The Beautiful Cigar Girl

Mary Rogers, Edgar Allan Poe, and the Invention of Murder

Author: Daniel Stashower

Publisher: Penguin

ISBN: 1440620482

Category: True Crime

Page: 400

View: 5258

On July 28, 1841, the body of Mary Rogers, a twenty-year-old cigar girl, was found floating in the Hudson-and New York's unregulated police force proved incapable of solving the crime. One year later, a struggling writer named Edgar Allan Poe decided to take on the case-and sent his fictional detective, C. Auguste Dupin, to solve the baffling murder of Mary Rogers in "The Mystery of Marie Rog t."

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