Search Results: gambling-and-war

Everyday Probability and Statistics

Health, Elections, Gambling and War

Author: Michael Mark Woolfson

Publisher: World Scientific

ISBN: 190897771X

Category: Mathematics

Page: 288

View: 1242

Probability and statistics impinge on the life of the average person in a variety of ways — as is suggested by the title of this book. Very often information is provided that is factually accurate but intended to give a biased view. This book presents the important results of probability and statistics without making heavy mathematical demands on the reader. It should enable an intelligent reader to properly assess statistical information and to understand that the same information can be presented in different ways. In this second edition the author presents a new chapter exploring science and society including the way that scientists communicate with the public on current topics, such as global warming. The book also investigates pensions and pension policy, and how they are influenced by changing actuarial tables. Contents:The Nature of ProbabilityCombining ProbabilitiesA Day at the RacesMaking Choices and SelectionsNon-Intuitive Examples of ProbabilityProbability and HealthCombining Probabilities: The Craps Game RevealedThe UK National Lottery, Loaded Dice and Crooked WheelsBlock DiagramsThe Normal (or Gaussian) DistributionStatistics: The Collection and Analysis of Numerical DataThe Poisson Distribution and Death by Horse KicksPredicting Voting PatternsTaking Samples: How Many Fish in the Pond?Differences: Rats and IQsCrime is Increasing and DecreasingMy Uncle Joe Smoked 60 a DayChance, Luck and Making DecisionsScience and SocietyThe Pensions Problem Readership: Undergraduate students in mathematics; general public interested in probability and statistics. Keywords:Probability;StatisticsKey Features:Assumes a modest mathematical backgroundDeals with matters of everyday lifePresents problems and solutions for the reader to test their level of understanding

Gambling and War

Risk, Reward, and Chance in International Conflict

Author: Justin Conrad

Publisher: Naval Institute Press

ISBN: 1682472205

Category: History

Page: 256

View: 468

In 1914, as Germany mobilized for war, Chancellor Theobald von Bethmann-Hollweg remarked to the country’s legislators, “If the iron dice must roll, then God help us.” War has often been compared to a game of dice or a lottery. But just as frequently, war has been compared to a game of pure strategy like chess. Napoleon’s shocking successes during the early years of the Napoleonic Wars, for instance, are often attributed to strategic superiority and his ability to see the conflict in the same way a player sees the pieces on a chess board. In reality, the business of negotiating with adversaries, fighting wars, and ending wars is far more complicated than a game of chess where each player can see all the pieces on the board and knows the possible paths that they can take. Even a casual observer of history can see that war is far more chaotic and unpredictable. And yet, international bargaining and international conflict is not a simple dice game either, where human beings have no control over the outcome. A comprehensive analysis of why wars occur and how they are fought must take into account a variety of factors including strategy, human error and dumb luck. And perhaps no game in human history better captures these elements than the game of poker. Indeed, Prussian military theorist Carl von Clausewitz remarked that “war most closely resembles a game of cards.” To succeed in poker, it is not enough to simply anticipate the actions of other players and try to outsmart them. A successful player must also have an understanding of, and a healthy appreciation for, the role of randomness. Additionally, players must confront the reality that all human beings are prone to errors in judgment, which causes them to make suboptimal choices under many circumstances. Taken together, all of these challenges make poker a fascinating and highly unpredictable game, explaining its enduring popularity. This book focuses on applying lessons learned from poker, blackjack, roulette and other games of chance to study of international conflict. The book demonstrates how the combined factors of strategy, psychology and probability influence the outbreak of wars, how they are fought, and why they end. Drawing on scholarly insights from a variety of fields, including probability, statistics, political science, psychology and economics, the book offers thoughts on how we can better manage and prevent international conflict, the costliest game of all.

Playing the Numbers

Gambling in Harlem Between the Wars

Author: Shane White

Publisher: Harvard University Press

ISBN: 9780674051072

Category: Games

Page: 299

View: 6742

The phrase “Harlem in the 1920s” evokes images of the Harlem Renaissance, or of Marcus Garvey and soapbox orators haranguing crowds about politics and race. Yet the most ubiquitous feature of Harlem life between the world wars was the game of “numbers.” Thousands of wagers, usually of a dime or less, would be placed on a daily number derived from U.S. bank statistics. The rewards of “hitting the number,” a 600-to-1 payoff, tempted the ordinary men and women of the Black Metropolis with the chimera of the good life. Playing the Numbers tells the story of this illegal form of gambling and the central role it played in the lives of African Americans who flooded into Harlem in the wake of World War I. For a dozen years the “numbers game” was one of America’s rare black-owned businesses, turning over tens of millions of dollars every year. The most successful “bankers” were known as Black Kings and Queens, and they lived royally. Yet the very success of “bankers” like Stephanie St. Clair and Casper Holstein attracted Dutch Schultz, Lucky Luciano, and organized crime to the game. By the late 1930s, most of the profits were being siphoned out of Harlem. Playing the Numbers reveals a unique dimension of African American culture that made not only Harlem but New York City itself the vibrant and energizing metropolis it was. An interactive website allows readers to locate actors and events on Harlem’s streets.

The Invisible Satirist

Juvenal and Second-century Rome

Author: James Uden

Publisher: Oxford University Press, USA

ISBN: 0199387273

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 260

View: 4812

Based on author's dissertation, Columbia Univ., 2011.

The Theory of Gambling and Statistical Logic

Author: Richard A. Epstein

Publisher: Academic Press

ISBN: 012397870X

Category: Games

Page: 465

View: 9802

Early in his rise to enlightenment, man invented a concept that has since been variously viewed as a vice, a crime, a business, a pleasure, a type of magic, a disease, a folly, a weakness, a form of sexual substitution, an expression of the human instinct. He invented gambling. Recent advances in the field, particularly Parrondo's paradox, have triggered a surge of interest in the statistical and mathematical theory behind gambling. This interest was acknowledge in the motion picture, "21," inspired by the true story of the MIT students who mastered the art of card counting to reap millions from the Vegas casinos. Richard Epstein's classic book on gambling and its mathematical analysis covers the full range of games from penny matching to blackjack, from Tic-Tac-Toe to the stock market (including Edward Thorp's warrant-hedging analysis). He even considers whether statistical inference can shed light on the study of paranormal phenomena. Epstein is witty and insightful, a pleasure to dip into and read and rewarding to study. The book is written at a fairly sophisticated mathematical level; this is not "Gambling for Dummies" or "How To Beat The Odds Without Really Trying." A background in upper-level undergraduate mathematics is helpful for understanding this work. Comprehensive and exciting analysis of all major casino games and variants Covers a wide range of interesting topics not covered in other books on the subject Depth and breadth of its material is unique compared to other books of this nature Richard Epstein's website: www.gamblingtheory.net

Clubhouse Confidential

A Yankee Bat Boy's Insider Tale of Wild Nights, Gambling, and Good Times with Modern Baseball's Greatest Team

Author: Luis Castillo,William Cane

Publisher: Macmillan

ISBN: 0312645422

Category: Biography & Autobiography

Page: 304

View: 2649

In an exposé filled with never-before-told anecdotes, the author offers a long-awaited inside look at baseball's biggest stars--from Derek Jeter and A-Rod to Joe Torre and George Steinbrenner.

Gambling and Survival in Native North America

Author: Paul Pasquaretta

Publisher: University of Arizona Press

ISBN: 9780816522897

Category: Social Science

Page: 202

View: 7297

"The Pequots have found success at their southeastern Connecticut casino in spite of the odds. But in considering their story, Paul Pasquaretta shifts the focus from casinos to the political struggles that have marked the long history of indigenous-colonial relations.

Gambling on War

Confidence, Fear, and the Tragedy of the First World War

Author: Roger L. Ransom

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

ISBN: 1108608175

Category: Business & Economics

Page: N.A

View: 1894

The First World War left a legacy of chaos that is still with us a century later. Why did European leaders resort to war and why did they not end it sooner? Roger L. Ransom sheds new light on this enduring puzzle by employing insights from prospect theory and notions of risk and uncertainty. He reveals how the interplay of confidence, fear, and a propensity to gamble encouraged aggressive behavior by leaders who pursued risky military strategies in hopes of winning the war. The result was a series of military disasters and a war of attrition which gradually exhausted the belligerents without producing any hope of ending the war. Ultimately, he shows that the outcome of the war rested as much on the ability of the Allied powers to muster their superior economic resources to continue the fight as it did on success on the battlefield.

Suburban Xanadu

The Casino Resort on the Las Vegas Strip and Beyond

Author: David Schwartz G

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 1136757406

Category: Games

Page: 240

View: 9713

Urban gambling, linked to poverty, crime and corruption, was once considered a blight on US cities. Gambling then followed the exodus of Americans into the suburbs after World War II and now, at the beginning of the 21st century, most Americans live within a four-hour drive of a casino. What explains the success of places like Las Vegas? The self-contained casino resort removes gambling and its social problems from cities and provides Americans with the comfort of gambling in a setting matched to their suburban lifestyle. In a detailed look at the growth of the earliest casino resorts to the 'pleasure palaces' and riverboat casinos of today, 'Suburban Xanadu' locates the rise of the casino resort in suburbanization and the significance of this development for today.

Gangsters to Governors

The New Bosses of Gambling in America

Author: David Clary

Publisher: Rutgers University Press

ISBN: 0813584558

Category: Business & Economics

Page: 344

View: 6299

Generations ago, gambling in America was an illicit activity, dominated by gangsters like Benny Binion and Bugsy Siegel. Today, forty-eight out of fifty states permit some form of legal gambling, and America’s governors sit at the head of the gaming table. But have states become addicted to the revenue gambling can bring? And does the potential of increased revenue lead them to place risky bets on new casinos, lotteries, and online games? In Gangsters to Governors, journalist David Clary investigates the pros and cons of the shift toward state-run gambling. Unearthing the sordid history of America’s gaming underground, he demonstrates the problems with prohibiting gambling while revealing how today’s governors, all competing for a piece of the action, promise their citizens payouts that are rarely delivered. Clary introduces us to a rogue’s gallery of colorful characters, from John “Old Smoke” Morrissey, the Irish-born gangster who built Saratoga into a gambling haven in the nineteenth century, to Sheldon Adelson, the billionaire casino magnate who has furiously lobbied against online betting. By exploring the controversial histories of legal and illegal gambling in America, he offers a fresh perspective on current controversies, including bans on sports and online betting. Entertaining and thought-provoking, Gangsters to Governors considers the past, present, and future of our gambling nation. Author's website (http://www.davidclaryauthor.com)

War Against the Idols

The Reformation of Worship from Erasmus to Calvin

Author: Carlos M. N. Eire

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

ISBN: 9780521379847

Category: History

Page: 336

View: 3765

Calling attention to the importance of the idolatry issue during the Reformation, this study traces the development of Protestant iconoclastic theology and practice and lays a foundation for understanding the conflicting Reformed ideology.

United States Income and War Tax Guide

Author: William KixMiller

Publisher: N.A

ISBN: N.A

Category: Income tax

Page: 113

View: 9784

United States Income and War Tax Guide Based on Revenue Act of ... and Regulations, Rulings and Decisions Up to ...

Author: William KixMiller,Arnold Rudolph Ruprecht Baar

Publisher: N.A

ISBN: N.A

Category: Income tax

Page: N.A

View: 522

I'll Do My Own Damn Killin'

Benny Binion, Herbert Noble, and the Texas Gambling War

Author: Gary Sleeper

Publisher: Barricade Books Incorporated

ISBN: 9781569804667

Category: Games

Page: 264

View: 676

In the early days, before he founded the Horseshoe Casino in Las Vegas and became the patron saint of the World Series of Poker, cowboy Benny Binion was a horse trader, a bootlegger, and the "boss gambler" of Dallas and Fort Worth, Texas. This book traces Binion's rise to power in the Dallas underworld during World War II. By 1946, more than two dozen "casinos" operated illegally in downtown Dallas in hotel suites, and Benny Binion owned at least half of them. The cowboy's only true rival for gambling supremacy in Texas was his former partner, Herbert Noble. For the first time ever, Gary Sleeper reveals the intricacies of the bloody feud between Binion and Noble, and their brutal war for control of Dallas and Fort Worth. Included are details of the thirteen attempts on Noble's life, the tragic murder of his wife, and Noble's bizarre plot to gain revenge by bombing Las Vegas from a private airplane.

Casino Women

Courage in Unexpected Places

Author: Susan Chandler,Jill B. Jones

Publisher: Cornell University Press

ISBN: 080146269X

Category: Business & Economics

Page: 240

View: 6519

Based on extended interviews with maids, cocktail waitresses, cooks, laundry workers, dealers, pit bosses, and vice presidents, Casino Women is a pioneering look at the female face of corporate gaming.

Betting the Line

Sports Wagering in American Life

Author: Richard O. Davies,Richard G. Abram

Publisher: Ohio State University Press

ISBN: 9780814208809

Category: Games

Page: 212

View: 538

A study of gambling, particularly sports gambling, and how it has thrived in American culture. According to Davies and Abram, the culture of betting results from two complementary influences in American society: risk-taking and speculation. This is the first effort by academic writers to describe and interpret the history of sports wagering in the United States. Although many books have been written about 3how to bet and win, 4 Betting the Line presents a serious history of this popular activity in Colonial and Civil War eras to today, from early betting on horse racing and baseball to the modern venues of basketball and football. By considering topics as diverse as the business of a bookie, the expansion of legalized gambling, and the increase in popularity of televised sports, the authors offer readers an insightful look into a practice that has become commonplace in American popular culture. In a mere seventy years, the number of states where gambling is legal jumped from one to forty-eight. Yet Nevada remains the only state where sports betting is legal. This book challenges many long-standing myths and stereotypes that revolve around the enterprise, arguing that sports gambling is reflective of the American free enterprise culture.

Forty Years a Gambler on the Mississippi

Author: George H. Devol

Publisher: Applewood Books

ISBN: 1557091102

Category: Biography & Autobiography

Page: 300

View: 8834

George H. Devol was the greatest riverboat gambler in the history of the Mississippi. Born in Ohio in 1829, he ran away from home and worked as a cabin boy at age ten. At fourteen he could stack a deck of cards. Over the years, he bilked soldiers, paymasters, cotton buyers, thieves, and businessmen alike. He fought more fights than anyone, and was never beaten. This is his story. Nobody was ever bored by it.

A Concise History of Afghanistan in 25 Volumes

Author: Hamid Wahed Alikuzai

Publisher: Trafford Publishing

ISBN: 1490714472

Category: History

Page: 1016

View: 1307

For 35,000 years ancient Afghanistan was called Aryana (the Light of God) has existed. Then in 747 AD what is today called Afghanistan became Khorasan (which means Sunrise in Dari) which was a much larger geographical area. In the middle of the nineteenth century the name Afghanistan, which means home of the united tribes, was applied originally by the Saxons (present day British) and the Russians. During the Great Games in the middle of nineteenth century, the Durand Line was created in 1893 and was in place until 1993. Saxons created the state of Afghanistan out of a geographical area roughly the size of Texas: in 1893 before which there were 10 million square kilometers, larger than the size of Canada, as means to act as a buffer zone between the Saxon-India & Tsarist-Russia and the Chinese.

Something for Nothing

Luck in America

Author: Jackson Lears

Publisher: Penguin

ISBN: 1101200375

Category: Social Science

Page: 408

View: 1349

Jackson Lears has won accolades for his skill in identifying the rich and unexpected layers of meaning beneath the familiar and mundane in our lives. Now, he challenges the conventional wisdom that the Protestant ethic of perseverance, industry, and disciplined achievement is what made America great. Turning to the deep, seldom acknowledged reverence for luck that runs through our entire history from colonial times to the early twenty-first century, Lears traces how luck, chance, and gambling have shaped and, at times, defined our national character.

Wigwam and War-path

Or, The Royal Chief in Chains

Author: Alfred Benjamin Meacham

Publisher: N.A

ISBN: N.A

Category: Indians of North America

Page: 700

View: 2241

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