Search Results: gardens-in-the-dunes

Gardens in the Dunes

A Novel

Author: Leslie Marmon Silko

Publisher: Simon and Schuster

ISBN: 1439127891

Category: Fiction

Page: 480

View: 4183

A sweeping, multifaceted tale of a young Native American pulled between the cherished traditions of a heritage on the brink of extinction and an encroaching white culture, Gardens in the Dunes is the powerful story of one woman’s quest to reconcile two worlds that are diametrically opposed. At the center of this struggle is Indigo, who is ripped from her tribe, the Sand Lizard people, by white soldiers who destroy her home and family. Placed in a government school to learn the ways of a white child, Indigo is rescued by the kind-hearted Hattie and her worldly husband, Edward, who undertake to transform this complex, spirited girl into a “proper” young lady. Bit by bit, and through a wondrous journey that spans the European continent, traipses through the jungles of Brazil, and returns to the rich desert of Southwest America, Indigo bridges the gap between the two forces in her life and teaches her adoptive parents as much as, if not more than, she learns from them.

Gardens in the Dunes

A Novel

Author: Leslie Marmon Silko

Publisher: Simon and Schuster

ISBN: 0684863324

Category: Fiction

Page: 477

View: 6529

An Indian girl left orphaned after soldiers raid and destroy her village is adopted by a well-meaning American family, but she cannot forget her past and accept the white traditions and education they expect her to embrace. 35,000 first printing. Tour.

Gardens in the Dunes

A Novel

Author: Leslie Marmon Silko

Publisher: N.A

ISBN: N.A

Category: Fiction

Page: 479

View: 3767

An Indian girl left orphaned after soldiers raid and destroy her village is adopted by a well-meaning American family, but she cannot forget her past and accept the white traditions and education they expect her to embrace. 35,000 first printing. Tour.

Reading Leslie Marmon Silko

Critical Perspectives Through Gardens in the Dunes

Author: Laura Coltelli

Publisher: Pisa University Press

ISBN: 9788884924322

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 239

View: 7476

Leslie Marmon Silko (Laguna, b. 1949) has long been a significant contributor to modern American Indian literature. In this landmark volume, leading scholars from Europe and North America assess her career and growing legacy, focusing especially on her visionary novel,Gardens in the Dunes. Topics include the power of modern resistance, indigenous feminism, the role of history, the effects of European culture and history on her work, and the force of storytelling and nonlinear narration. These essays variously and insightfully illuminate the work and life of a remarkable Native writer in the twenty-first century.

Ceremony

Author: Leslie Marmon Silko

Publisher: Penguin

ISBN: 9780143104919

Category: Fiction

Page: 243

View: 7755

On a New Mexico reservation, one Navajo family--including Tayo, a World War II veteran deeply scarred by his experiences as a Japanese POW and by the rejection of his own people--struggles to survive in a world no longer theirs in the years just before and after World War II. Reader's Guide available. Reissue. 30,000 first printing.

Yellow Woman and a Beauty of the Spirit

Author: Leslie Marmon Silko

Publisher: Simon and Schuster

ISBN: 1439128324

Category: History

Page: 208

View: 8521

Bold and impassioned, sharp and defiant, Leslie Marmon Silko's essays evoke the spirit and voice of Native Americans. Whether she is exploring the vital importance literature and language play in Native American heritage, illuminating the inseparability of the land and the Native American people, enlivening the ways and wisdom of the old-time people, or exploding in outrage over the government's long-standing, racist treatment of Native Americans, Silko does so with eloquence and power, born from her profound devotion to all that is Native American. Yellow Woman and a Beauty of the Spirit is written with the fire of necessity. Silko's call to be heard is unmistakable; there are stories to remember, injustices to redress, ways of life to preserve. It is a work of major importance, filled with indispensable truths--a work by an author with an original voice and a unique access to both worlds.

The Turquoise Ledge

A Memoir

Author: Leslie Marmon Silko

Publisher: Penguin

ISBN: 9781101464588

Category: Biography & Autobiography

Page: 336

View: 6502

A highly original and poetic self-portrait from one of America's most acclaimed writers. Leslie Marmon Silko's new book, her first in ten years, combines memoir with family history and reflections on the creatures and beings that command her attention and inform her vision of the world, taking readers along on her daily walks through the arroyos and ledges of the Sonoran desert in Arizona. Silko weaves tales from her family's past into her observations, using the turquoise stones she finds on the walks to unite the strands of her stories, while the beauty and symbolism of the landscape around her, and of the snakes, birds, dogs, and other animals that share her life and form part of her family, figure prominently in her memories. Strongly influenced by Native American storytelling traditions, The Turquoise Ledge becomes a moving and deeply personal contemplation of the enormous spiritual power of the natural world-of what these creatures and landscapes can communicate to us, and how they are all linked. The book is Silko's first extended work of nonfiction, and its ambitious scope, clear prose, and inventive structure are captivating. The Turquoise Ledge will delight loyal fans and new readers alike, and it marks the return of the unique voice and vision of a gifted storyteller.

Leslie Marmon Silko

Ceremony, Almanac of the Dead, Gardens in the Dunes

Author: David L. Moore

Publisher: Bloomsbury Publishing

ISBN: 1472523121

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 256

View: 8849

A major American writer at the turn of this millennium, Leslie Marmon Silko has also been one of the most powerful voices in the flowering of Native American literature since the publication of her 1977 novel Ceremony. This guide, with chapters written by leading scholars of Native American literature, explores Silko's major novels Ceremony, Almanac of the Dead, and Gardens in the Dunes as an entryway into the full body of her work that includes poetry, essays, short fiction, film, photography, and other visual art. These chapters map Silko's place in the broad context of American literary history. Further, they trace her pivotal role in prompting other Indigenous writers to enter the conversations she helped to launch. Along the way, the book engages her historical themes of land, ethnicity, race, gender, trauma, and healing, while examining her narrative craft and her mythic lyricism.

Conversations with Leslie Marmon Silko

Author: Leslie Marmon Silko,Ellen L. Arnold

Publisher: Univ. Press of Mississippi

ISBN: 9781578063017

Category: Biography & Autobiography

Page: 200

View: 8193

Offers insight into the author's life through her own words, providing information on her life in Albuquerque and her experiences as a women of mixed ancestry.

Calligraphy of the Witch

Author: Alicia Gaspar de Alba

Publisher: Arte Publico Press

ISBN: 1558857532

Category: Fiction

Page: 440

View: 4694

After being captured by pirates, Concepciâon Benavidez, a young Spanish girl who has been impregnated by the pirate captain, is sold as a slave to a prominent Puritan and finds herself accused of witchcraft by the residents of Salem Village.

Doubters and Dreamers

Author: Janice Gould

Publisher: University of Arizona Press

ISBN: 0816501297

Category: Poetry

Page: 96

View: 9776

Doubters and Dreamers opens with a question from a young girl faced with the spectacle of Indian effigies lynched and burned “in jest” before UC Berkeley’s annual Big Game against Stanford: “What’s a debacle, Mom?” This innocent but telling question marks the girl’s entrée into the complicated knowledge of her heritage as a mixed-blood Native American of Koyangk’auwi (Concow) Maidu descent. The girl is a young Janice Gould, and the poems and narrations that follow constitute a remarkable work of sustained and courageous self-revelation, retracing the precarious emotional terrain of an adolescence shaped by a mother’s tough love and a growing consciousness of an ancestral and familial past. In the first half of the book, “Tribal History,” Gould ingeniously repurposes the sonnet form to preserve the stories of her mother and aunt, who grew up when “muleback was the customary mode / of transport” and the “spirit world was present”—stories of “old ways” and places claimed in memory but lost in time. Elsewhere, she remembers her mother’s “ferocious, upright anger” and her unexpected tenderness (“Like a miracle, I was still her child”), culminating in the profound expression of loss that is the poem “Our Mother’s Death.” In the second half of the book, “It Was Raining,” Gould tells of the years of lonely self-making and “unfulfilled dreams” as she comes to terms with what she has been told are her “crazy longings” as a lesbian: “It’s been hammered into me / that I’ll be spurned / by a ‘real woman,’ / the only kind I like.” The writing here commemorates old loves and relationships in language that mingles hope and despair, doubt and devotion, veering at times into dreamlike moments of consciousness. One poem and vignette at a time, Doubters and Dreamers explores what it means to be a mixed-blood Native American who grew up urban, lesbian, and middle class in the West.

Songbird Journeys

Four Seasons In the Lives of Migratory Birds

Author: Miyoko Chu

Publisher: Bloomsbury Publishing USA

ISBN: 9780802718440

Category: Science

Page: 320

View: 4534

Until recently, little was known about the lives of songbirds during their travels from autumn until spring. Now scientists have documented mass migrations over the Gulf of Mexico, identified the voices of migrants in the night sky, and showed how songbirds navigate using stars, polarized light, and magnetic fields. Miyoko Chu explores the intricacies underlying the ebb and flow of migration, the cycle of seasons, and the interconnectedness between distant places. Songbird Journeys pays homage to the wonder and beauty of songbirds while revealing the remarkable lives of migratory birds and the scientific quest to answer age-old questions about where songbirds go, how they get there, and what they do in the far-flung places they inhabit throughout the year.

The Sea Came in at Midnight

A Novel

Author: Steve Erickson

Publisher: Open Road Media

ISBN: 1480409979

Category: Fiction

Page: 259

View: 5502

“If you read one philosophical-doomsday kinky-sex road-trip novel this year, make it this one.” —Salon It’s New Year’s Eve 1999, and the members of a powerful cult are about to commit ritual suicide. Fleeing their ranks at the final moment, teenager Kristin lands in Tokyo, where she gains employment listening to clients’ stories in a “memory hotel” designed to address the decay of Japanese collective memory after the Second World War. But Kristin herself has a startling odyssey: Among other things, it involves answering a personal ad only to wind up imprisoned, naked, in an empty house presided over by a man known as the Occupant, hard at work on a millennial calendar that has serious implications for the future. The Sea Came in at Midnight is a breathtaking fable of redemption and one of Erickson’s most impressive visions to date.

The Girl in the Garden

Author: Melanie Wallace

Publisher: Houghton Mifflin Harcourt

ISBN: 0544784200

Category: Fiction

Page: 224

View: 2507

An unforgettable novel about a young woman and her infant son, abandoned at a seaside motel in New England, and the secrets of the townspeople who provide them with shelter. When June arrives on the coast of New England, baby in arms, an untrustworthy man by her side, Mabel—who rents them a cabin—senses trouble. A few days later, the girl and her child are abandoned. June is soon placed with Mabel’s friend, Iris, in town, and her life becomes entwined with a number of locals who have known one another for decades: a wealthy recluse with a tragic past; a widow in mourning; a forsaken daughter returning for the first time in years, with a stranger in tow; a lawyer, whose longings he can never reveal; and a kindly World War II veteran who serves as the town's sage. Surrounded by the personal histories and secrets of others, June finds the way forward for herself and her son amid revelations of the others' pasts, including loves—and crimes—from years ago. In vivid, nuanced prose, Melanie Wallace—“a writer with a tender regard for the marginal, the missing and the lost”*—explores the time-tested bonds of a small community, the healing power of friendship and love, and whether the wrongs of the past can ever be made right. * Hilary Mantel

Philistines at the Hedgerow

Passion and Property in the Hamptons

Author: Steven Gaines

Publisher: Little, Brown

ISBN: 031649027X

Category: Architecture

Page: 352

View: 9227

Bestselling author Steven Gaines's "richly entertaining" (People) and juicy social history of the Hamptons. As one of America's most fabled communities--long a magnet for artists, celebrities, the very rich, and their respective hangers-on--the Hamptons have been a scene of constant collision among the established old guard, New Money, and the local families who farmed and fished the region for generations. In serving up three centuries of Hamptons history, Steven Gaines introduces a host of colorful characters including Jackson Pollock, Ron Perelman, Lauren Bacall, and the Bouvier Beales of Grey Gardens infamy. Philistines at the Hedgerow is a mesmerizing feat of storytelling--a book that takes us behind the privet hedges and rolling sand dunes and brings vivid life to the curious passions and personalities that animate the Hamptons.

Beyond Settler Time

Temporal Sovereignty and Indigenous Self-Determination

Author: Mark Rifkin

Publisher: Duke University Press

ISBN: 0822373424

Category: Social Science

Page: 296

View: 8813

What does it mean to say that Native peoples exist in the present? In Beyond Settler Time Mark Rifkin investigates the dangers of seeking to include Indigenous peoples within settler temporal frameworks. Claims that Native peoples should be recognized as coeval with Euro-Americans, Rifkin argues, implicitly treat dominant non-native ideologies and institutions as the basis for defining time itself. How, though, can Native peoples be understood as dynamic and changing while also not assuming that they belong to a present inherently shared with non-natives? Drawing on physics, phenomenology, queer studies, and postcolonial theory, Rifkin develops the concept of "settler time" to address how Native peoples are both consigned to the past and inserted into the present in ways that normalize non-native histories, geographies, and expectations. Through analysis of various kinds of texts, including government documents, film, fiction, and autobiography, he explores how Native experiences of time exceed and defy such settler impositions. In underscoring the existence of multiple temporalities, Rifkin illustrates how time plays a crucial role in Indigenous peoples’ expressions of sovereignty and struggles for self-determination.

Masculinities in Literature of the American West

Author: Lydia R. Cooper

Publisher: Springer

ISBN: 1137564776

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 197

View: 8256

The Western genre provides the most widely recognized, iconic images of masculinity in the United States - gun-slinging, laconic white male heroes who emphasize individualism, violence, and an idiosyncratic form of justice. This idealized masculinity has been fused with ideas of national identity and character. Masculinities in Literature of the American West examines how contemporary literary Westerns push back against the coded image of the Western hero, exposing pervasive anxieties about what it means to "act like a man." Contemporary Westerns critique assumptions about innate connections between power, masculinity, and "American" character that influence public rhetoric even in the late 20th and early 21st centuries. These novels struggle with the monumental challenge of all Westerns: the challenge of being human in a place where "being a man" is so strictly coded, so unachievable, so complicit in atrocity, and so desirable that it is worth dying for, worth killing for, or perhaps worth nothing at all.

Oceanstory

Author: Leslie Marmon Silko

Publisher: Odyssey Editions

ISBN: 1623730155

Category: Fiction

Page: 69

View: 2562

A new novella from the acclaimed author of Ceremony, and Almanac of the Dead. Leslie Marmon Silko is the author of the novels Ceremony, Almanac of the Dead, and Gardens in the Dunes. She has also written many short stories, poems and essays, and her most recent book is a memoir, The Turquoise Ledge. The recipient of a MacArthur Fellowship and an NEA fellowship, Silko lives in Tucson, Arizona, on the boundary of Saguaro National Park West.

The Sparrow Sisters

A Novel

Author: Ellen Herrick

Publisher: HarperCollins

ISBN: 0062386352

Category: Fiction

Page: 384

View: 6389

With echoes of the alchemy of Practical Magic, the lushness of Saving CeeCee Honeycutt, and the darkly joyful wickedness of the Witches of Eastwick, Ellen Herrick’s debut novel spins an enchanting love story about a place where magic whispers just beneath the surface and almost anything is possible, if you aren’t afraid to listen. The Sparrow Sisters are as tightly woven into the seaside New England town of Granite Point as the wild sweet peas that climb the stone walls along the harbor. Sorrel, Nettie and Patience are as colorful as the beach plums on the dunes and as mysterious as the fog that rolls into town at dusk. Patience is the town healer and when a new doctor settles into Granite Point he brings with him a mystery so compelling that Patience is drawn to love him, even as she struggles to mend him. But when Patience Sparrow’s herbs and tinctures are believed to be implicated in a local tragedy, Granite Point is consumed by a long-buried fear—and its three hundred year old history resurfaces as a modern day witch-hunt threatens. The plants and flowers, fruit trees and high hedges begin to wither and die, and the entire town begins to fail; fishermen return to the harbor empty-handed, and blight descends on the old elms that line the lanes. It seems as if Patience and her town are lost until the women of Granite Point band together to save the Sparrow. As they gather, drawing strength from each other, will they be able to turn the tide and return life to Granite Point? The Sparrow Sisters is a beautiful, haunting, and thoroughly mesmerizing novel that will capture your imagination.

Parks and Gardens in Greater Paris

Author: Jacqueline Widmar Stewart

Publisher: N.A

ISBN: 9783936681512

Category: Architecture

Page: 191

View: 5654

For over 350 years Parisians have designed and preserved phenomenal public outdoor spaces. In this book Jacqueline Widmar Stewart follows the fine-spun threads of the parklands tapestry in greater Paris. Identification of various hallmarks of premiere park-building eras imbues individual parks with multi-dimensional qualities and allows readers to experience these grand green places in the way Parisians do. Multiple layers of elements and themes are woven into the fabric of French parks. Reaching back as far as its Roman heritage, vestiges of the history of Paris are apparent in virtually all its parks, regardless of size. Even the balanced distribution of green spaces throughout the city reflects a major 19th-century city-planning epoch and is still carried forward in current park development. A number of French parks and gardens from the 17th century initially belonged to royal estates but now welcome public visits -- it should be noted that the Tuileries first opened its gates to the public in 1667. Thoughtfully designed and meticulously tailored to needs of the time, others have covered unsightly urban blight with splendor, and have converted industrial sites to recreational usage while maintaining cultural ties with the past. Many marvels beckon all who enter Paris' magical spheres: a several-kilometer-long landscaped promenade above busy streets; a modern garden suspended above a major train station; the Parc de la Villette with its grand red architectural curiosities of form and motion; a midisland allée in the Seine; newly created marshlands now home to mallard ducklings; clouds of fragrance from rose-descendants of Josephine Bonaparte's original collection; not one, but two gardens of the quintessential sculptor, Auguste Rodin.

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