Search Results: greek-and-roman-political-ideas-a-pelican-introduction

Greek and Roman Political Ideas

A Pelican Introduction

Author: Melissa Lane

Publisher: Penguin UK

ISBN: 0141976160

Category: Political Science

Page: 256

View: 1766

What is politics? What are the origins of political philosophy? What can we learn from the Greeks and Romans? In Greek and Roman Political Ideas, acclaimed classics scholar Melissa Lane introduces the reader to the foundations of Western political thought, from the Greeks, who invented democracy, to the Romans, who created a republic and then transformed it into an empire. Tracing the origins of political philosophy from Socrates to Cicero to Plutarch, Lane reminds us that the birth of politics was as much a story of individuals as ideas.

A Culture of Freedom

Ancient Greece and the Origins of Europe

Author: Christian Meier

Publisher: OUP Oxford

ISBN: 0191652407

Category: History

Page: 344

View: 8195

Historians and President of the German Academy for Language and Literature in Darmstadt and in 2003 received thee prestigious Jacob Grimm prize for German literature. culture so special? A Culture of Freedom attempts to answer this question - to find the key to the 'miracle' of ancient Greece. The book takes us on a tour through the rich spectrum of Greek life and culture, from their epic and lyric poetry, political thought and philosophy, to their social life, military traditions, sport, and religious festivals, and finally to the early stages of Greek democracy. Running as a connecting thread throughout is a people's attempt to create a society based upon the freedom rather than power. It is this which, Meier argues, is the distinctive key to Greek culture, marking it out from all that had gone before, including the ancient societies of the Middle East from which the Greeks otherwise borrowed so much. The ancient Greeks managed to build a society founded on the concept of freedom - and by doing so helped mould the Europe that we live in today.

The Domesticated Brain

A Pelican Introduction

Author: Bruce Hood

Publisher: Penguin UK

ISBN: 0141974877

Category: Science

Page: 352

View: 9125

What makes us social animals? Why do we behave the way we do? How does the brain influence our behaviour? The brain may have initially evolved to cope with a threatening world of beasts, limited food and adverse weather, but we now use it to navigate an equally unpredictable social landscape. In The Domesticated Brain, renowned psychologist Bruce Hood explores the relationship between the brain and social behaviour, looking for clues as to origins and operations of the mechanisms that keep us bound together. How do our brains enable us to live together, to raise children, and to learn and pass on information and culture? Combining social psychology with neuroscience, Hood provides an essential introduction to the hidden operations of the brain, and explores what makes us who we are.

Human Evolution

A Pelican Introduction

Author: Robin Dunbar

Publisher: Penguin UK

ISBN: 0141975326

Category: Science

Page: 432

View: 4057

What makes us human? How did we develop language, thought and culture? Why did we survive, and other human species fail? The past 12,000 years represent the only time in the sweep of human history when there has been only one human species. How did this extraordinary proliferation of species come about - and then go extinct? And why did we emerge such intellectual giants? The tale of our origins has inevitably been told through the 'stones and bones' of the archaeological record, yet Robin Dunbar shows it was our social and cognitive changes rather than our physical development which truly made us distinct from other species.

Who Governs Britain?

Author: Anthony King

Publisher: Penguin UK

ISBN: 0141980664

Category: Political Science

Page: 352

View: 9240

The British system has been radically transformed in recent decades, far more than most of us realise. As acclaimed political scientist and bestselling author Anthony King shows, this transformation lies at the heart of British politics today. Imagining - or pretending - that the British political system and Britain's place in the world have not greatly changed, our political leaders consistently promise more than they can perform. Political and economic power is now widely dispersed both inside and outside the UK, but Westminster politicians still talk the language of Attlee and Churchill. How exactly has the British system changed? Where does power now lie? In Who Governs Britain?, King offers the first assessment in many years of Britain's governing arrangements as a whole, providing much needed context for the 2015 general election.

Classical Literature

An Epic Journey from Homer to Virgil and Beyond

Author: Richard Jenkyns

Publisher: Basic Books

ISBN: 0465097987

Category: History

Page: 288

View: 5931

The writings of the Greeks and Romans form the bedrock of Western culture. Inventing the molds for histories, tragedies, and philosophies, while pioneering radical new forms of epic and poetry, the Greeks and Romans created the literary world we still inhabit today. Writing with verve and insight, distinguished classicist Richard Jenkyns explores a thousand years of classical civilization, carrying readers from the depths of the Greek dark ages through the glittering heights of Rome’s empire. Jenkyns begins with Homer and the birth of epic poetry before exploring the hypnotic poetry of Pindar, Sappho, and others from the Greek dark ages. Later, in Athens’s classical age, Jenkyns shows the radical nature of Sophocles’s choice to portray Ajax as a psychologically wounded warrior, how Aeschylus developed tragedy, and how Herodotus, in “inventing history,” brought to narrative an epic and tragic quality. We meet the strikingly modern figure of Virgil, struggling to mirror epic art in an age of empire, and experience the love poems of Catullus, who imbued verse with obsessive passion as never before. Even St. Paul and other early Christian writers are artfully grounded here in their classical literary context. A dynamic and comprehensive introduction to Greek and Roman literature, Jenkyns’s Classical Literature is essential reading for anyone seeking a deeper understanding of the classics—and the extraordinary origins of Western culture.

Democratic Ideals and Reality

A Study in the Politics of Reconstruction

Author: Sir Halford John Mackinder

Publisher: N.A

ISBN: N.A

Category: Geopolitics

Page: 266

View: 7854

The Birth of Politics

Eight Greek and Roman Political Ideas and Why They Matter

Author: Melissa Lane

Publisher: Princeton University Press

ISBN: 1400865549

Category: Philosophy

Page: 400

View: 1974

In The Birth of Politics, Melissa Lane introduces the reader to the foundations of Western political thought, from the Greeks, who invented democracy, to the Romans, who created a republic and then transformed it into an empire. Tracing the origins of our political concepts from Socrates to Plutarch to Cicero, Lane reminds us that the birth of politics was a story as much of individuals as ideas. Scouring the speeches of lawyers alongside the speculations of philosophers, and the reflections of ex-slaves next to the popular comedies and tragedies of the Greek and Roman stages, this book brings ancient ideas to life in unexpected ways. Lane shows how the Greeks and Romans defined politics with distinctive concepts, vocabulary, and practices—all of which continue to influence politics and political aspirations around the world today. She focuses on eight political ideas from the Greco-Roman world that are especially influential today: justice, virtue, constitution, democracy, citizenship, cosmopolitanism, republic, and sovereignty. Lane also describes how the ancient formulations of these ideas often challenge widely held modern assumptions—for example, that it is possible to have political equality despite great economic inequality, or that political regimes can be indifferent to the moral character of their citizens. A stimulating introduction to the origins of our political ideas and ideals, The Birth of Politics demonstrates how much we still have to learn from the political genius of the Greeks and Romans.

The European Union: A Citizen's Guide

Author: Chris Bickerton

Publisher: Penguin UK

ISBN: 0141983108

Category: Political Science

Page: 256

View: 2524

The essential Pelican introduction to the European Union - its history, its politics, and its role today For most of us today, 'Europe' refers to the European Union. At the centre of a seemingly never-ending crisis, the EU remains a black box, closed to public understanding. Is it a state? An empire? Is Europe ruled by Germany or by European bureaucrats? Does a single European economy exist after all these years of economic integration? And should the EU have been awarded the Nobel peace prize in 2012? Critics tell us the EU undermines democracy. Are they right? In this provocative volume, political scientist Chris Bickerton provides an answer to all these key questions and more at a time when understanding what the EU is and what it does is more important than ever before.

Economics: The User's Guide

Author: Ha-Joon Chang

Publisher: Bloomsbury Publishing USA

ISBN: 1620408120

Category: Business & Economics

Page: 384

View: 5784

The award-winning author of 23 Things They Don't Tell You About Capitalism outlines the real-world processes of the global economy while explaining how to better understand the strengths and weaknesses of key economics theories to better navigate today's interconnected world.

Ancient Rome

City Planning and Administration

Author: O. F. Robinson

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 113484493X

Category: History

Page: 272

View: 1559

Rome was a huge city. Running it required not only public works and services but also specialised law. This innovative work traces the development of that law and system in the main areas of administration. The book incorporates and develops previous historical and topographical works by relating their findings to the Roman legal framework, building up a portrait of public administration, unusually comprehensive for the ancient world.

The Prison Planet

Author: Craig Swartz

Publisher: N.A

ISBN: 9781478730125

Category: Fiction

Page: 516

View: 9114

An ancient book is lost and then found, and its discovery sets in motion a family's quest that will last centuries, resulting in death, destruction and downright depression for everyone else. What if you knew the ultimate truth of the Universe? What if you had the capability of affecting everyone else on Earth? What would you do with that knowledge? The Hauptleiter family asked themselves these very questions ever since they acquired ownership of the Book, yet all the while going about their business of world domination. But now the real authors of the Book have deemed it time for them to relinquish it, and the implications abound as to what this means for the rest of humanity, particularly a very small subset of humans. Marlo and Vince Teller have just moved to Oregon from Ohio in a desperate search for some new meaning of their lives. Even after losing everything when their business failed, they persevered and retained some small hope that something good would eventually happen in their lives, that they still had time to help their autistic son Kyle cope with his own uncertain future. David Weatheridge, a down-and-out British journalist presently going through the motions of trying to keep his career afloat, would appear to be an unlikely candidate to do anything remotely connected with world salvation. But that is exactly where he finds himself when he encounters a trio of overly friendly auditors who coax him on a train bound for Oregon. What is going to happen in Oregon? And why is beer even related to the outcome? Craig Swartz weaves an engaging and humorous tale that explores our origins and searches for an elusive answer to that one endlessly nagging question; why are we here? His otherworldly story involves all the aforementioned people and a cast of others who end up discussing and learning about aliens, autism, conspiracy, fear, greed, love, peace, philosophy, racism, reincarnation, spiritualism and war. It's been said that a journey of a thousand miles begins with the first step. This is the story of that first step.

Greek Homosexuality

Author: Kenneth James Dover

Publisher: Harvard University Press

ISBN: 9780674362703

Category: History

Page: 246

View: 7694

To what extent and in what ways was homosexuality approved by the ancient Greeks? An eminent classicist examines the evidence--vase paintings, archaic and classical poetry, the dialogues of Plato, speeches in the law courts, the comedies of Aristophanes--and reaches provocative conclusions. A discussion of female homosexuality is included.

The Meaning of Science

An Introduction to the Philosophy of Science

Author: Tim Lewens

Publisher: Basic Books

ISBN: 0465097499

Category: Science

Page: 272

View: 2424

Science has produced explanations for everything from the mechanisms of insect navigation to the formation of black holes and the workings of black markets. But how much can we trust science, and can we actually know the world through it? How does science work and how does it fail? And how can the work of scientists helpÑor hurtÑeveryday people? These are not questions that science can answer on its own. This is where philosophy of science comes in. Studying science without philosophy is, to quote Einstein, to be Òlike somebody who has seen thousands of trees but has never seen a forest.Ó Cambridge philosopher Tim Lewens shows us the forest. He walks us through the theories of seminal philosophers of science Karl Popper and Thomas Kuhn and considers what science is, how far it can and should reach, and how we can determine the nature of its truths and myths. These philosophical issues have consequences that stretch far beyond the laboratory. For instance: What role should scientists have in policy discussions on environmental issues such as fracking? What are the biases at play in the search for a biological function of the female orgasm? If brain scans can be used to demonstrate that a decision was made several seconds before a person actually makes a conscious choice, what does that tell us about the possibility of free will? By examining science through this philosophical lens, Lewens reveals what physics can teach us about reality, what biology teaches us about human nature, and what cognitive science teaches us about human freedom. A masterful analysis of the biggest scientific and ethical issues of our age, The Meaning of Science forces us to confront the practical, personal, and political purposes of scienceÑand why it matters to all of us.

Caliphate

The History of an Idea

Author: Hugh Kennedy

Publisher: Basic Books

ISBN: 0465094392

Category: History

Page: 336

View: 4075

In Caliphate, Arab historian Hugh Kennedy offers a grand history of the caliphate since the death of the prophet Mohammed to its modern Islamist incarnations. He begins by vividly describing the political and cultural legacies of the Arab caliphates that shaped the Islamic Golden Age. From the seventh-century Rashiduns and Ummayyads to the twelfth- and thirteenth-century Abbasids and Fatimids, we explore the tolerant rule of Umar, witness the traumatic murder of the tyrannical caliph Uthman, and revel in the flourishing arts of the Moors of Andalucia. Kennedy then delves into the modern fate of the caliphate, from the British political schemes to spur dissent against the Ottomans in the twentieth century to the ominous calls of Islamist leaders for a new Muslim caliphate in the twenty-first. An authoritative new account of the dynasties of Arab leaders, Caliphate traces the history—and misappropriations—of one of the world’s most potent political ideas.

How to See the World

An Introduction to Images, from Self-Portraits to Selfies, Maps to Movies, and More

Author: Nicholas Mirzoeff

Publisher: Basic Books

ISBN: 0465096018

Category: Social Science

Page: 352

View: 2574

Every two minutes, Americans alone take more photographs than were printed in the entire nineteenth century; every minute, people from around the world upload over 300 hours of video to YouTube; and in 2014, we took over one trillion photographs. From the funny memes that we send to our friends to the disturbing photographs we see in the news, we are consuming and producing images in quantities and ways that could never have been anticipated. In the process, we are producing a new worldview powered by changing demographics—one where the majority of people are young, urban, and globally connected. In How to See the World, visual culture expert Nicholas Mirzoeff offers a sweeping look at history’s most famous images—from Velázquez’s Las Meninas to the iconic “Blue Marble”—to contextualize and make sense of today’s visual world. Drawing on art history, sociology, semiotics, and everyday experience, he teaches us how to close read everything from astronaut selfies to Impressionist self-portraits, from Hitchcock films to videos taken by drones. Mirzoeff takes us on a journey through visual revolutions in the arts and sciences, from new mapping techniques in the seventeenth century to new painting styles in the eighteenth and the creation of film, photography, and x-rays in the nineteenth century. In today’s networked world, mobile technology and social media enable us to exercise “visual activism”—the practice of producing and circulating images to drive political and social change. Whether we are looking at pictures showing the effects of climate change on natural and urban landscapes or an fMRI scan demonstrating neurological addiction, Mirzoeff helps us to find meaning in what we see. A powerful and accessible introduction to this new visual culture, How to See the World reveals how images shape our lives, how we can harness their power for good, and why they matter to us all.

1177 B.C.

The Year Civilization Collapsed

Author: Eric H. Cline

Publisher: Princeton University Press

ISBN: 1400874491

Category: History

Page: 264

View: 6042

In 1177 B.C., marauding groups known only as the "Sea Peoples" invaded Egypt. The pharaoh's army and navy managed to defeat them, but the victory so weakened Egypt that it soon slid into decline, as did most of the surrounding civilizations. After centuries of brilliance, the civilized world of the Bronze Age came to an abrupt and cataclysmic end. Kingdoms fell like dominoes over the course of just a few decades. No more Minoans or Mycenaeans. No more Trojans, Hittites, or Babylonians. The thriving economy and cultures of the late second millennium B.C., which had stretched from Greece to Egypt and Mesopotamia, suddenly ceased to exist, along with writing systems, technology, and monumental architecture. But the Sea Peoples alone could not have caused such widespread breakdown. How did it happen? In this major new account of the causes of this "First Dark Ages," Eric Cline tells the gripping story of how the end was brought about by multiple interconnected failures, ranging from invasion and revolt to earthquakes, drought, and the cutting of international trade routes. Bringing to life the vibrant multicultural world of these great civilizations, he draws a sweeping panorama of the empires and globalized peoples of the Late Bronze Age and shows that it was their very interdependence that hastened their dramatic collapse and ushered in a dark age that lasted centuries. A compelling combination of narrative and the latest scholarship, 1177 B.C. sheds new light on the complex ties that gave rise to, and ultimately destroyed, the flourishing civilizations of the Late Bronze Age—and that set the stage for the emergence of classical Greece.

The Terms of Order

Political Science and the Myth of Leadership

Author: Cedric J. Robinson

Publisher: UNC Press Books

ISBN: 1469628228

Category: Political Science

Page: 310

View: 727

Do we live in basically orderly societies that occasionally erupt into violent conflict, or do we fail to perceive the constancy of violence and disorder in our societies? In this classic book, originally published in 1980, Cedric J. Robinson contends that our perception of political order is an illusion, maintained in part by Western political and social theorists who depend on the idea of leadership as a basis for describing and prescribing social order. Using a variety of critical approaches in his analysis, Robinson synthesizes elements of psychoanalysis, structuralism, Marxism, classical and neoclassical political philosophy, and cultural anthropology in order to argue that Western thought on leadership is mythological rather than rational. He then presents examples of historically developed "stateless" societies with social organizations that suggest conceptual alternatives to the ways political order has been conceived in the West. Examining Western thought from the vantage point of a people only marginally integrated into Western institutions and intellectual traditions, Robinson's perspective radically critiques fundamental ideas of leadership and order.

Method and Politics in Plato's Statesman

Author: M. S. Lane,Melissa S. Lane

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

ISBN: 9780521582292

Category: Philosophy

Page: 229

View: 4952

Among Plato's works, the Statesman is usually seen as transitional between the Republic and the Laws. This book argues that the dialogue deserves a special place of its own. Whereas Plato is usually thought of as defending unchanging knowledge, Dr Lane demonstrates how, by placing change at the heart of political affairs, Plato reconceives the link between knowledge and authority. The statesman is shown to master the timing of affairs of state, and to use this expertise in managing the conflict of opposed civic factions. To this political argument corresponds a methodological approach which is seen to rely not only on the familiar method of 'division', but equally on the unfamiliar centrality of the use of 'example'. The demonstration that method and politics are interrelated transforms our understanding of the Statesman and its fellow dialogues.

The Christians as the Romans Saw Them

Author: Robert Louis Wilken

Publisher: Yale University Press

ISBN: 9780300098396

Category: History

Page: 214

View: 9268

This book offers an engrossing portrayal of the early years of the Christian movement from the perspective of the Romans.

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