Search Results: groundwork-charles-hamilton-houston-and-the-struggle-for-civil-rights

Groundwork

Charles Hamilton Houston and the Struggle for Civil Rights

Author: Genna Rae McNeil

Publisher: University of Pennsylvania Press

ISBN: 9780812200836

Category: Law

Page: 344

View: 4085

"A classic. . . . [It] will make an extraordinary contribution to the improvement of race relations and the understanding of race and the American legal process."—Judge A. Leon Higginbotham, Jr., from the Foreword Charles Hamilton Houston (1895-1950) left an indelible mark on American law and society. A brilliant lawyer and educator, he laid much of the legal foundation for the landmark civil rights decisions of the 1950s and 1960s. Many of the lawyers who won the greatest advances for civil rights in the courts, Justice Thurgood Marshall among them, were trained by Houston in his capacity as dean of the Howard University Law School. Politically Houston realized that blacks needed to develop their racial identity and also to recognize the class dimension inherent in their struggle for full civil rights as Americans. Genna Rae McNeil is thorough and passionate in her treatment of Houston, evoking a rich family tradition as well as the courage, genius, and tenacity of a man largely responsible for the acts of "simple justice" that changed the course of American life.

Groundwork

Charles Hamilton Houston and the Struggle for Civil Rights

Author: Genna McNeil

Publisher: University of Pennsylvania Press

ISBN: 9780812211795

Category: Law

Page: 344

View: 9963

"A classic. . . . [It] will make an extraordinary contribution to the improvement of race relations and the understanding of race and the American legal process."—Judge A. Leon Higginbotham, Jr., from the Foreword Charles Hamilton Houston (1895-1950) left an indelible mark on American law and society. A brilliant lawyer and educator, he laid much of the legal foundation for the landmark civil rights decisions of the 1950s and 1960s. Many of the lawyers who won the greatest advances for civil rights in the courts, Justice Thurgood Marshall among them, were trained by Houston in his capacity as dean of the Howard University Law School. Politically Houston realized that blacks needed to develop their racial identity and also to recognize the class dimension inherent in their struggle for full civil rights as Americans. Genna Rae McNeil is thorough and passionate in her treatment of Houston, evoking a rich family tradition as well as the courage, genius, and tenacity of a man largely responsible for the acts of "simple justice" that changed the course of American life.

Root and Branch

Charles Hamilton Houston, Thurgood Marshall, and the Struggle to End Segregation

Author: Rawn James, Jr.

Publisher: Bloomsbury Publishing USA

ISBN: 9781608191680

Category: History

Page: 288

View: 2231

Although widely viewed as the beginning of the legal struggle to end segregation, the U.S. Supreme Court's decision Brown v. Board of Education was in fact the culmination of decades of legal challenges led by a band of lawyers intent on dismantling segregation one statute at a time. Root and Branch is the compelling story of the fiercely committed laywers that constructed the legal foundation for what we now call the civil rights movement. Charles Hamilton Houston laid the groundwork, reinventing the law school at Howard University (where he taught a young, brash Thurgood Marshall) and becoming special counsel to the NAACP. Later Houston and Marshall traveled through the hostile South, looking for cases with which to dismantle America's long-systematized racism, often at great personal risk. The abstemious, buttoned-down Houston and the folksy, easygoing Marshall made an unlikely pair-but their accomplishments in bringing down Jim Crow made an unforgettable impact on U.S. legal history.

Land Reform in Japan

Author: Ronald Dore

Publisher: A&C Black

ISBN: 1780939655

Category: Business & Economics

Page: 510

View: 8546

The land reform carried out in Japan during the period of American Occupation is often spoken of as one of the most successful of the post-war reforms. It was certainly one of the most thorough going redistributions of land which the world has seen. A third of the total area of arable land changed hands, and nearly a third of the total population of the country was affected. Socially, the land reform accelerated the decay in feudal institutions, rendering the lot of the Japanese farmer considerably better than it once was. First published in 1984, this title is part of the Bloomsbury Academic Collections series.

Emancipation

The Making of the Black Lawyer, 1844-1944

Author: J. Clay Smith, Jr

Publisher: University of Pennsylvania Press

ISBN: 9780812216851

Category: Law

Page: 760

View: 9885

"Emancipation is an important and impressive work; one cannot read it without being inspired by the legal acumen, creativity, and resiliency these pioneer lawyers displayed. . . . It should be read by everyone interested in understanding the road African-Americans have traveled and the challenges that lie ahead."—From the Foreword, by Justice Thurgood Marshall

Young Thurgood

The Making of a Supreme Court Justice

Author: Larry S. Gibson

Publisher: Prometheus Books

ISBN: 1616145722

Category: Biography & Autobiography

Page: 413

View: 2221

Thurgood Marshall was the most important American lawyer of the twentieth century. He transformed the nation's legal landscape by challenging the racial segregation that had relegated millions to second-class citizenship. He won twenty-nine of thirty-three cases before the United States Supreme Court, was a federal appeals court judge, served as the US solicitor general, and, for twenty-four years, sat on the Supreme Court. Marshall is best known for achievements after he relocated to New York in 1936 to work for the NAACP. But Marshall's personality, attitudes, priorities, and work habits had crystallized during earlier years in Maryland. This work is the first close examination of the formative period in Marshall's life. As the authorn shows, Thurgood Marshall was a fascinating man of contrasts. He fought for racial justice without becoming a racist. Simultaneously idealistic and pragmatic, Marshall was a passionate advocate, yet he maintained friendly relationships with his opponents. Young Thurgood reveals how Marshall's distinctive traits were molded by events, people, and circumstances early in his life. Professor Gibson presents fresh information about Marshall's family, youth, and education. He describes Marshall's key mentors, the special impact of his high school and college competitive debating, his struggles to establish a law practice during the Great Depression, and his first civil rights cases. The author sheds new light on the NAACP and its first lawsuits in the campaign that led to the 1954 Brown v. Board of Education school desegregation decision. He also corrects some of the often-repeated stories about Marshall that are inaccurate. The only biography of Thurgood Marshall to be endorsed by Marshall’s immediate family, Young Thurgood is an exhaustively researched and engagingly written work that everyone interested in law, civil rights, American history, and biography will want to read. From the Hardcover edition.

Undoing Plessy

Charles Hamilton Houston, Race, Labor, and the Law, 1895-1950

Author: Gordon Andrews

Publisher: Cambridge Scholars Publishing

ISBN: 144385929X

Category: Biography & Autobiography

Page: 250

View: 861

Undoing Plessy: Charles Hamilton Houston, Race, Labor and the Law, 1895–1950 explores the manner in which African Americans countered racialized impediments, attacking their legal underpinnings during the first half of the twentieth century. Specifically, Undoing Plessy explores the professional life of Charles Hamilton Houston, and the way it informs our understanding of change in the pre-Brown era. Houston dedicated his life to the emancipation of oppressed people, and was inspired early-on to choose the law as a tool to become, in his own words, a “social engineer.” Further, Houston’s life provides a unique lens through which one may more accurately view the threads of race, labor, and the law as they are woven throughout American society. Houston understood the difficulties facing black workers in America, and, by marshaling his considerable skills as an attorney and leader, was able to construct a strategy that fought for full integration by changing the laws of the United States at the highest level. With unparalleled success, Houston developed a three-pronged strategy from 1925–1950 that focused on the courts, the workplace, and politics, securing the expansion of labor rights and civil rights for African Americans. Better than most, Charles Houston understood that the right to work was inherently necessary to achieve real, not just perceived, freedom. To that end, Undoing Plessy situates Houston’s life within the contested cultural and political realities of his time, expanding our understanding of what it meant to work and be free in America during the first half of the twentieth century. In particular, these gains were achieved in areas significant to workers, including education, the workplace, access to unions, housing, and equality before the law at the local, state, and federal levels. To understand Charles Houston’s contributions on behalf of those who labored in the black community, and more broadly in American society, his life is contextualized within the long Civil Rights Movement. Houston’s work was intimately connected with many profound efforts to liberate those who were oppressed. Undoing Plessy examines his strategies and accomplishments, helping us to further understand the complexities of change in the pre-Brown Era, and offers us compelling insights into dilemmas currently facing those in the workplace.

Thurgood Marshall

Race, Rights, and the Struggle for a More Perfect Union

Author: Charles L. Zelden

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 113617494X

Category: History

Page: 240

View: 978

Thurgood Marshall was an Associate Justice of the US Supreme Court from 1967 to 1991. He was the first African American to hold that position, and was one of the most influential legal actors of his time. Before being appointed to the Supreme Court by President Lyndon Johnson, Marshall was a lawyer for the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People (NAACP), Federal Judge (1961-1965), and Solicitor General of the United States (1965-1966). Marshall won twenty-nine of thirty-two cases before the Supreme Court – most notably the landmark case of Brown v. Board of Education, which held segregated public schools unconstitutional. Marshall spent his career fighting racial segregation and legal inequality, and his time on the court establishing a record for supporting the "voiceless American." He left a legacy of change that still affects American society today. Through this concise biography, accompanied by primary sources that present Marshall in his own words, students will learn what Marshall did (and did not do) during his life, why those actions were important, and what effects his efforts had on the larger course of American history.

African Americans and Jews in the Twentieth Century

Studies in Convergence and Conflict

Author: V. P. Franklin

Publisher: University of Missouri Press

ISBN: 9780826260581

Category: History

Page: 366

View: 7400

In recent scholarship, academics have focused primarily on areas of conflict between Blacks and Jews; yet, in the long struggle to bring social justice to American society, these two groups have often worked as allies in both the organized labor and the civil rights movements. Demonstrating the complexity of the relationship of Blacks and Jews in America, African Americans and Jews in the Twentieth Century examines the competition and solidarity that have characterized Black-Jewish interactions over the past century. These essays provide an intellectual foundation for cooperative efforts to improve social justice in our society and are an invaluable resource for the study of race relations in twentieth-century America. Copyright © Libri GmbH. All rights reserved.

Answering the Call

An Autobiography of the Modern Struggle to End Racial Discrimination in America

Author: Nathaniel R. Jones

Publisher: New Press, The

ISBN: 1620970716

Category: Biography & Autobiography

Page: 416

View: 2145

Answering the Call is an extraordinary eyewitness account from an unsung hero of the battle for racial equality in America—a battle that, far from ending with the great victories of the civil rights era, saw some of its signal achievements in the desegregation fights of the 1970s and its most notable setbacks in the affirmative action debates that continue into the present in Ferguson, Baltimore, and beyond. Judge Nathaniel R. Jones’s pathbreaking career was forged in the 1960s: as the first African American assistant U.S. attorney in Ohio; as assistant general counsel of the Kerner Commission; and, beginning in 1969, as general counsel of the NAACP. In that latter role, Jones coordinated attacks against Northern school segregation—a vital, divisive, and poorly understood chapter in the movement for equality—twice arguing in the pivotal U.S. Supreme Court case Bradley v. Milliken, which addressed school desegregation in Detroit. He also led the national response to the attacks against affirmative action, spearheading and arguing many of the signal legal cases of that effort. Judge Jones's story is an essential corrective to the idea of a post-racial America—his voice and his testimony offering enduring evidence of the unfinished work of ending Jim Crow's legacy.

Witness

Two Hundred Years of African-American Faith and Practice at the Abyssinian Baptist Church of Harlem, New York

Author: Genna Rae McNeil,Houston Bryan Roberson,Quinton Hosford Dixie,Kevin McGruder

Publisher: Wm. B. Eerdmans Publishing

ISBN: 0802863418

Category: Religion

Page: 656

View: 1613

Presents a history of the Abyssinian Baptist Church in Harlem, New York City, discussing its organization in 1809, its famous senior pastors, and its struggles and triumphs.

Ma'am Anna

The Remarkable Story of a Human Trafficking Rescuer

Author: Anna Rodriguez,Anthony Bunko

Publisher: Titletown Pub

ISBN: 9780985799816

Category: Biography & Autobiography

Page: 193

View: 5691

Anna Rodriguez, more than any other documented person in the United States, reaches into the night and grabs the hands of those stolen through human trafficking. She then does everything within her power to pull them out and put them back together. Human trafficking has infiltrated not only the international community but the United States with the annual Super Bowl being a prime area for trafficking every year, unknown to the public. Ma'am Anna is the first-ever human trafficking rescuer memoir. It puts readers courageously and unmistakably inside human trafficking and chronicles how one woman dared to track and hunt traffickers and recover our stolen human beings being sold as property. She is a modern-day abolitionist recognised as a hero by former President George W. Bush. Her efforts have led to the formation of the Florida Coalition on Human Trafficking. Ma'am Anna shows that one person can make a difference and readers experience not only the raw reality of what happens when a person is trafficked but the joy of reading survivor updates.

Americans Who Tell the Truth

Author: Robert Shetterly

Publisher: Paw Prints

ISBN: 9781442028708

Category:

Page: 46

View: 9408

Features quotes, biographies, and portraits of powerful and influential Americans, including Rachel Carson, Rosa Parks, and Mark Twain, who used the power of truth combined with freedom of speech to challenge the system and inspire change. Reprint.

The Second Reconstruction

A History of the Modern Civil Rights Movement

Author: Gary Donaldson

Publisher: Krieger Publishing Company

ISBN: N.A

Category: Political Science

Page: 153

View: 7959

This text traces the history of the civil rights movement in the years following World War II, to the present day. Issues discussed the Civil Rights Act of 1964, the Voting Rights of 1965, and the Northern Ireland ghetto's.

We Are Not Afraid

The Story of Goodman, Schwerner, and Chaney, and the Civil Rights Campaign for Mississippi

Author: Seth Cagin,Philip Dray

Publisher: Nation Books

ISBN: 9781560258643

Category: History

Page: 500

View: 8854

We Are Not Afraid is the story of the 1964 killing of James Chaney, Andrew Goodman, and Michael Schwerner in Philadelphia, Mississippi, at the hands of Ku Klux Klansmen and the local cops. Described as "one of the best books on the civil rights movement," the murders it describes inspired the acclaimed film, Mississippi Burning. The events surrounding this seminal event have re-entered public debate due to the recent conviction of manslaughter by Klansman and Imperial Wizard, Edgar Ray Killen, for his part in orchestrating the murders. As America struggles to honestly confront its history of racism, there has never been a more timely moment to reissue this fully updated edition of We Are Not Afraid. From the roles played by such figures as Martin Luther King, Jr. and Robert Kennedy to the remarkable courage of the Freedom Riders, this book relates the definitive story of a nation's ongoing battle for true democracy.

Hidden Figures

Young Readers' Edition

Author: Margot Lee Shetterly

Publisher: N.A

ISBN: 9780606396233

Category:

Page: N.A

View: 1419

For use in schools and libraries only. Now in a special new edition perfect for young readers, this is the amazing true story of four African-American female mathematicians at NASA who helped achieve some of the greatest moments in our space program. Soon to be a major motion picture. Before John Glenn orbited the earth or Neil Armstrong walked on the moon, a group of dedicated female mathematicians known as "human computers" used pencils, slide rules, and adding machines to calculate the numbers that would launch rockets, and astronauts, into space. This book brings to life the stories of Dorothy Vaughan, Mary Jackson, Katherine Johnson, and Christine Darden, four African-American women who lived through the Civil Rights era, the Space Race, the Cold War, and the movement for gender equality, and whose work forever changed the face of NASA and the country.

A Ghetto Takes Shape

Black Cleveland, 1870-1930

Author: Kenneth L. Kusmer

Publisher: University of Illinois Press

ISBN: 9780252006906

Category: History

Page: 305

View: 6527

The Battle for the Black Ballot

Smith V. Allwright and the Defeat of the Texas All-white Primary

Author: Charles L. Zelden

Publisher: N.A

ISBN: N.A

Category: Law

Page: 156

View: 2760

The history of voting rights in America is a checkerboard marked by dogged progress against persistent prejudice toward an expanding inclusiveness. The Supreme Court decision in Smith v. Allwright is a crucial chapter in that broader story and marked a major turning point for the modern civil rights movement. Charles Zelden's concise and thoughtful retelling of this episode reveals why. Denied membership in the Texas Democratic Party by popular consensus, party rules, and, from 1923 to 1927, state statutes, Texas blacks were routinely turned away from voting in the Democratic primary in the first decades of the twentieth century. Given that Texas was a one-party state and that the primary effectively determined who held office, this meant the total exclusion of Texas blacks from the political process. This practice went unchecked until 1940, when Lonnie Smith, a black dentist from Houston, fought his exclusion by election judge S. E. Allwright in the 1940 Democratic Primary. Defeated in the lowercourts, Smith finally found justice in the U.S. Supreme Court, which ruled 8-1 that the Democratic Party and its primary were not "private and voluntary" and, thus, were duly bound by constitutional protections governing the electoral process and the rights of all citizens. The real meaning of Smith's challenge to the Texas all-white primary lies at the heart of the entire civil rights revolution. One of the first significant victories for the NAACP's newly formed Legal Defense Fund against Jim Crow segregation, it provided the conceptual foundation which underlay Thurgood Marshall's successful arguments in Brown v. Board of Education. It was also viewed by Marshall as one of his most importantpersonal victories. As Zelden shows, the Smith decision attacked the intractable heart of segregation, as it redrew the boundary between public and private action in constitutional law and laid the groundwork for many civil

Just Another Southern Town

Mary Church Terrell and the Struggle for Racial Justice in the Nation's Capital

Author: Joan Quigley

Publisher: Oxford University Press

ISBN: 0199371512

Category: African American women civil rights workers

Page: 320

View: 5053

In January of 1950, Mary Church Terrell, an 86-year-old charter member of the NAACP, headed into Thompson's Restaurant, just a few blocks from the White House, and requested to be served. She and her companions were informed by the manager that they could not eat in his establishment, because they were "colored." Terrell, a former suffragette and one of the country's first college-educated African American women, took the matter to court. Three years later, the Supreme Court vindicated her outrage: District of Columbia v. John R. Thompson Co., Inc. was decided in June 1953, invalidating the segregation of restaurants and cafes in the nation's capital. In Just Another Southern Town, Joan Quigley recounts an untold chapter of the civil rights movement: an epic battle to topple segregation in Washington, the symbolic home of American democracy. At the book's heart is the formidable Mary Church Terrell and the test case she mounts seeking to enforce Reconstruction-era laws prohibiting segregation in D.C. restaurants. Through the prism of Terrell's story, Quigley reassesses Washington's relationship to civil rights history, bringing to life a pivotal fight for equality that erupted five years before Rosa Parks refused to move to the back of a Montgomery bus and a decade before the student sit-in movement rocked segregated lunch counters across the South. At a time when most civil rights scholarship begins with Brown v. Board of Education, Just Another Southern Town unearths the story of the nation's capital as an early flashpoint on race. A rich portrait of American politics and society in the mid-20th century, it interweaves Terrell's narrative with the courtroom drama of the case and the varied personalities of the justices who ultimately voted unanimously to prohibit segregated restaurants. Resonating with gestures of courage and indignation that radiate from the capital's streets and sidewalks to its marble-clad seats of power, this work restores Mary Church Terrell and the case that launched a crusade to their rightful place in the pantheon of civil rights history.

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