Search Results: illinois-historical-journal

Illinois Historical Journal

Author: N.A

Publisher: N.A

ISBN: N.A

Category: Illinois

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View: 893

Illinois History

A Reader

Author: Mark Hubbard

Publisher: University of Illinois Press

ISBN: 0252050681

Category: History

Page: 256

View: 6489

A renaissance in Illinois history scholarship has sparked renewed interest in the Prairie State's storied past. Students, meanwhile, continue to pursue coursework in Illinois history to fulfill degree requirements and for their own edification. This Common Threads collection offers important articles from the Journal of the Illinois State Historical Society. Organized as an approachable survey of state history, the book offers chapters that cover the colonial era, early statehood, the Civil War years, the Gilded Age and Progressive eras, World War II, and postwar Illinois. The essays reflect the wide range of experiences lived by Illinoisans engaging in causes like temperance and women's struggle for a shorter workday; facing challenges that range from the rise of street gangs to Decatur's urban decline; and navigating historic issues like the 1822-24 constitutional crisis and the Alton School Case. Contributors: Roger Biles, Lilia Fernandez, Paul Finkelman, Raymond E. Hauser, Reginald Horsman, Suellen Hoy, Judson Jeffries, Lionel Kimble Jr., Thomas E. Pegram, Shirley Portwood, Robert D. Sampson, Ronald E. Shaw, and Robert M. Sutton.

Einführung in die amerikanische Geschichte

Author: Jürgen Heideking,Vera Nünning

Publisher: C.H.Beck

ISBN: 9783406441998

Category: United States

Page: 222

View: 8555

American Educational History Journal

Volume 41 #1 & 2

Author: Paul J. Ramsey

Publisher: IAP

ISBN: 1623967910

Category: Education

Page: 455

View: 2971

The American Educational History Journal is a peer?reviewed, national research journal devoted to the examination of educational topics using perspectives from a variety of disciplines. The editors of AEHJ encourage communication between scholars from numerous disciplines, nationalities, institutions, and backgrounds. Authors come from a variety of disciplines including political science, curriculum, history, philosophy, teacher education, and educational leadership. Acceptance for publication in AEHJ requires that each author present a well?articulated argument that deals substantively with questions of educational history.

A Guide to the History of Illinois

Author: John Hoffmann

Publisher: Greenwood Publishing Group

ISBN: 9780313241109

Category: History

Page: 349

View: 8943

A guide to the literature and sources of Illinois history. It includes descriptions of both primary and secondary sources. The first part of the book consists of bibliographical essays that focus on particular periods and topics in Illinois history. The second part includes 12 reports on the principal archival and manuscript repositories for documentation in the field of Illinois history. A final chapter surveys Illinois-related collections in the Library of Congress and the National Archives. "Reference & Research Book News" John Hoffmann's volume is the first comprehensive guide to the literature and sources of Illinois history. It includes full and careful descriptions of both primary and secondary sources. The first part of the book consists of bibliographical essays that focus on particular periods and topics in Illinois history. Eight chapters are devoted to specific areas, from 1673 to the present, while six chapters are thematic in nature, covering, for instance, the religious and educational history of the state, the voluminous literature on Chicago, and the subject of Abraham Lincoln in Illinois. These essays are preceded by introductory remarks on historical surveys, reference books, and periodicals in the field, studies of such topics as the medical and legal history of the state, and publications relating to maps and newspapers of Illinois. This long overdue guide will bring together the vast accumulation of primary and secondary materials that defines Illinois history. The nature and scope of this guide is unmatched by any previous work. The second part includes twelve reports on the principal archival and manuscript repositories for documentation in the field of Illinois history. This section provides detailed information on specific collections within the context of related sources on particular periods and topics. A final chapter surveys Illinois-related collections in the Library of Congress and the National Archives. As part of the series Reference Guides to State History and Research, this book provides a valuable resource for researchers, students, genealogists, and the interested public, and is an appropriate selection for reference collections in American, regional, or Illinois history.

Journal of Illinois History

Author: N.A

Publisher: N.A

ISBN: N.A

Category: Illinois

Page: N.A

View: 7588

Intelligent and Honest Radicals

The Chicago Federation of Labor and the Politics of Progression

Author: Mitchell Newton-Matza

Publisher: Lexington Books

ISBN: 0739180134

Category: History

Page: 254

View: 3929

Intelligent and Honest Radicals explores the Chicago labor movement's relationship to Illinois legal and political system. Newton-Matza focuses on the significant era between the great strike in 1919 to Franklin D. Roosevelt's inauguration and the beginning of the New Deal in 1933. He brings to light a number of victories and achievements for the labor movement in this period that are often over looked.

Journal of the Illinois State Historical Society

Author: N.A

Publisher: N.A

ISBN: N.A

Category: Illinois

Page: N.A

View: 8966

Issue for Mar. 1948 contains paper: The Beginnings of Swedish immigration into Illinois a century ago, by: Conrad Bergendoff.

A History of the Ninth Regiment Illinois Volunteer Infantry, with the Regimental Roster

Author: Marion Morrison

Publisher: SIU Press

ISBN: 9780809320424

Category: History

Page: 143

View: 1802

When the Civil War erupted in April 1861, many German immigrants in Illinois rushed to enlist in the Union Army. Volunteers from Illinois towns in St. Clair County - Belleville, Millstadt, Mascoutah, Lebanon, and others - marched to Springfield under the command of August Mersy, a veteran of the failed 1848 revolt in Baden, Germany. When these German immigrants reached Springfield, however, Mersy was rejected as commander because of his limited facility with English. Replaced by Colonel Eleazer A. Paine, an Ohioan and West Point graduate, Lieutenant Colonel Mersy fell to second in command of the Ninth Illinois Infantry Volunteers. As the two officers led the Ninth off to war, Mersy condemned Paine as a martinet and a politician. Within a few months, however, Paine received a promotion to general that left Mersy in charge of the Ninth. Once Grant began his Tennessee River campaign, the Ninth found itself in the thick of battle, bearing the brunt at Fort Donelson of the Confederate attempt to break Grant's siege lines. Less than two months later, the Ninth shored up sagging Union lines after the surprise Confederate attack at Shiloh Church, retreating only when their ammunition was gone. Depleted in numbers, the Ninth received 103 men from the 128th Illinois from Williamson County and 105 imprisoned deserters, who, under the influence of the veterans of the Ninth, became acceptable soldiers. After eighteen months of heavy fighting, the Ninth guarded supply lines. When the original three-year enlistment expired, only forty veterans from the original regiment reenlisted.

The Jury in Lincoln’s America

Author: Stacy Pratt McDermott

Publisher: Ohio University Press

ISBN: 0821444298

Category: Law

Page: 272

View: 5668

In the antebellum Midwest, Americans looked to the law, and specifically to the jury, to navigate the uncertain terrain of a rapidly changing society. During this formative era of American law, the jury served as the most visible connector between law and society. Through an analysis of the composition of grand and trial juries and an examination of their courtroom experiences, Stacy Pratt McDermott demonstrates how central the law was for people who lived in Abraham Lincoln’s America. McDermott focuses on the status of the jury as a democratic institution as well as on the status of those who served as jurors. According to the 1860 census, the juries in Springfield and Sangamon County, Illinois, comprised an ethnically and racially diverse population of settlers from northern and southern states, representing both urban and rural mid-nineteenth-century America. It was in these counties that Lincoln developed his law practice, handling more than 5,200 cases in a legal career that spanned nearly twenty-five years. Drawing from a rich collection of legal records, docket books, county histories, and surviving newspapers, McDermott reveals the enormous power jurors wielded over the litigants and the character of their communities.

The Invention of Party Politics

Federalism, Popular Sovereignty, and Constitutional Development in Jacksonian Illinois

Author: Gerald Leonard

Publisher: Univ of North Carolina Press

ISBN: 0807861316

Category: Political Science

Page: 344

View: 4249

This ambitious work uncovers the constitutional foundations of that most essential institution of modern democracy, the political party. Taking on Richard Hofstadter's classic The Idea of a Party System, it rejects the standard view that Martin Van Buren and other Jacksonian politicians had the idea of a modern party system in mind when they built the original Democratic party. Grounded in an original retelling of Illinois politics of the 1820s and 1830s, the book also includes chapters that connect the state-level narrative to national history, from the birth of the Constitution to the Dred Scott case. In this reinterpretation, Jacksonian party-builders no longer anticipate twentieth-century political assumptions but draw on eighteenth-century constitutional theory to justify a party division between "the democracy" and "the aristocracy." Illinois is no longer a frontier latecomer to democratic party organization but a laboratory in which politicians use Van Buren's version of the Constitution, states' rights, and popular sovereignty to reeducate a people who had traditionally opposed party organization. The modern two-party system is no longer firmly in place by 1840. Instead, the system remains captive to the constitutional commitments on which the Democrats and Whigs founded themselves, even as the specter of sectional crisis haunts the parties' constitutional visions.

On Jordan's Banks

Emancipation and Its Aftermath in the Ohio River Valley

Author: Darrel E. Bigham

Publisher: University Press of Kentucky

ISBN: 081314759X

Category: History

Page: 456

View: 9715

The story of the Ohio River and its settlements are an integral part of American history, particularly during the country's westward expansion. The vibrant African American communities along the Ohio's banks, however, have rarely been studied in depth. Blacks have lived in the Ohio River Valley since the late eighteenth century, and since the river divided the free labor North and the slave labor South, black communities faced unique challenges. In On Jordan's Banks, Darrel E. Bigham examines the lives of African Americans in the counties along the northern and southern banks of the Ohio River both before and in the years directly following the Civil War. Gleaning material from biographies and primary sources written as early as the 1860s, as well as public records, Bigham separates historical truth from the legends that grew up surrounding these communities. The Ohio River may have separated freedom and slavery, but it was not a barrier to the racial prejudice in the region. Bigham compares early black communities on the northern shore with their southern counterparts, noting that many similarities existed despite the fact that the Roebling Suspension Bridge, constructed in 1866 at Cincinnati, was the first bridge to join the shores. Free blacks in the lower Midwest had difficulty finding employment and adequate housing. Education for their children was severely restricted if not completely forbidden, and blacks could neither vote nor testify against whites in court. Indiana and Illinois passed laws to prevent black migrants from settling within their borders, and blacks already living in those states were pressured to leave. Despite these challenges, black river communities continued to thrive during slavery, after emancipation, and throughout the Jim Crow era. Families were established despite forced separations and the lack of legally recognized marriages. Blacks were subjected to intimidation and violence on both shores and were denied even the most basic state-supported services. As a result, communities were left to devise their own strategies for preventing homelessness, disease, and unemployment. Bigham chronicles the lives of blacks in small river towns and urban centers alike and shows how family, community, and education were central to their development as free citizens. These local histories and life stories are an important part of understanding the evolution of race relations in a critical American region. On Jordan's Banks documents the developing patterns of employment, housing, education, and religious and cultural life that would later shape African American communities during the Jim Crow era and well into the twentieth century.

The Wages of Sickness

The Politics of Health Insurance in Progressive America

Author: Beatrix Hoffman

Publisher: Univ of North Carolina Press

ISBN: 0807860727

Category: Health & Fitness

Page: 280

View: 4731

The Clinton administration's failed health care reform was not the first attempt to establish government-sponsored medical coverage in the United States. From 1915 to 1920, Progressive reformers led a spirited but ultimately unsuccessful crusade for compulsory health insurance in New York State. Beatrix Hoffman argues that this first health insurance campaign was a crucial moment in the creation of the American welfare state and health care system. Its defeat, she says, gave rise to an uneven and inegalitarian system of medical coverage and helped shape the limits of American social policy for the rest of the century. Hoffman examines each of the major combatants in the battle over compulsory health insurance. While physicians, employers, the insurance industry, and conservative politicians forged a uniquely powerful coalition in opposition to health insurance proposals, she shows, reformers' potential allies within women's organizations and the labor movement were bitterly divided. Against the backdrop of World War I and the Red Scare, opponents of reform denounced government-sponsored health insurance as "un-American" and, in the process, helped fashion a political culture that resists proposals for universal health care and a comprehensive welfare state even today.

Illinois history

an annotated bibliography

Author: Ellen M. Whitney,Illinois State Historical Library,Illinois State Historical Society

Publisher: Greenwood Pub Group

ISBN: 9780313282355

Category: History

Page: 603

View: 2959

Cosponsored by the Illinois State Historical Library and the Illinois State Historical Society, this bibliography lists more than 4,600 books, articles, and manuscript sources. Drawing on the publications of the sponsoring organizations as a guide and to form the core of the volume, the editors include the major historical publications related to Illinois. Following a chronology of Illinois history, entries are organized in both chronological and topical chapters. The volume provides the only extensive bibliography on Illinois history currently available. Covering the entire span of Illinois history from prehistory to the present, the chronological section includes chapters on such major periods as the early exploration and territorial periods, the Civil War era, the 19th century, and the Depression era. Topical chapters include broad topics, such as economic history, education, environment, and native Americans. The volume also includes a section devoted to biography and one covering general and regional histories and reference sources.

Enlightened Zeal

The Hudson's Bay Company and Scientific Networks, 1670-1870

Author: Theodore Binnema

Publisher: University of Toronto Press

ISBN: 1442666951

Category: Business & Economics

Page: 488

View: 5923

Enlightened Zeal examines the fascinating history of the Hudson’s Bay Company’s involvement in scientific networks during the company’s two-hundred year chartered monopoly. Working from the company’s voluminous records, Ted Binnema demonstrates the significance of science in the company’s corporate strategies. Initially highly secretive about all of its activities, the HBC was by 1870 an exceptionally generous patron of science. Aware of the ways that a commitment to scientific research could burnish its corporate reputation, the company participated in intricate symbiotic networks that linked the HBC as a corporation with individuals and scientific organizations in England, Scotland, and the United States. The pursuit of scientific knowledge could bring wealth and influence, along with tribute, fame, and renown, but science also brought less tangible benefits: adventure, health, happiness, male companionship, self-improvement, or a sense of meaning. The first study of scientific research in any chartered company over the entire course of its monopoly, Enlightened Zeal expands our understanding of social networks in science, establishes the vast scope of the HBC’s contribution to public knowledge, and will inspire new research into the history of science in other chartered monopolies.

A Government by the People

Direct Democracy in America, 1890-1940

Author: Thomas Goebel

Publisher: Univ of North Carolina Press

ISBN: 0807860182

Category: History

Page: 320

View: 6456

Between 1898 and 1918, many American states introduced the initiative, referendum, and recall--known collectively as direct democracy. Most interpreters have seen the motives for these reform measures as purely political, but Thomas Goebel demonstrates that the call for direct democracy was deeply rooted in antimonopoly sentiment. Frustrated with the governmental corruption and favoritism that facilitated the rise of monopolies, advocates of direct democracy aimed to check the influence of legislative bodies and directly empower the people to pass laws and abolish trusts. But direct democracy failed to achieve its promises: corporations and trusts continued to flourish, voter turnout rates did not increase, and interest groups grew stronger. By the 1930s, it was clear that direct democracy favored large organizations with the financial and organizational resources to fund increasingly expensive campaigns. Recent years have witnessed a resurgence of direct democracy, particularly in California, where ballot questions and propositions have addressed such volatile issues as gay rights and affirmative action. In this context, Goebel's analysis of direct democracy's history, evolution, and ultimate unsuitability as a grassroots tool is particularly timely.

A People's History of the Civil War

Struggles for the Meaning of Freedom

Author: David Williams

Publisher: New Press, The

ISBN: 1595587470

Category: History

Page: 594

View: 1875

Bottom-up history at its very best, A People’s History of the Civil War "does for the Civil War period what Howard Zinn’s A People’s History of the United States did for the study of American history in general" (Library Journal). Widely praised upon its initial release, it was described as "meticulously researched and persuasively argued" by the Atlanta Journal-Constitution. Historian David Williams has written the first account of the American Civil War though the eyes of ordinary people—foot soldiers, slaves, women, prisoners of war, draft resisters, Native Americans, and others. Richly illustrated with little-known anecdotes and first-hand testimony, this pathbreaking narrative moves beyond presidents and generals to tell a new and powerful story about America’s most destructive conflict. A People’s History of the Civil War is "readable social history" that "sheds fascinating light" (Publishers Weekly) on this crucial period. In so doing it recovers the long-overlooked perspectives and forgotten voices of one of the defining chapters of American history.

Black Newspapers and America's War for Democracy, 1914-1920

Author: William G. Jordan

Publisher: Univ of North Carolina Press

ISBN: 080787552X

Category: Social Science

Page: 256

View: 2951

During World War I, the publishers of America's crusading black newspapers faced a difficult dilemma. Would it be better to advance the interests of African Americans by affirming their patriotism and offering support of President Wilson's war for democracy in Europe, or should they demand that the government take concrete steps to stop the lynching, segregation, and disfranchisement of blacks at home as a condition of their participation in the war? This study of their efforts to resolve that dilemma offers important insights into the nature of black protest, race relations, and the role of the press in a republican system. William Jordan shows that before, during, and after the war, the black press engaged in a delicate and dangerous dance with the federal government and white America--at times making demands or holding firm, sometimes pledging loyalty, occasionally giving in. But although others have argued that the black press compromised too much, Jordan demonstrates that, given the circumstances, its strategic combination of protest and accommodation was remarkably effective. While resisting persistent threats of censorship, the black press consistently worked at educating America about the need for racial justice.

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