Search Results: john-c-calhoun-and-the-roots-of-war

John C. Calhoun and the Roots of War

Author: Thomas A. Durwood,Teresa Noel Celsi

Publisher: Silver Burdett Pr

ISBN: 9780382240454

Category: Legislators

Page: 135

View: 8998

A biography of the senator from South Carolina who fought for the South's interests and to keep the institution of slavery.

Civil War - Book & PowerPoint CD

Author: Linda Armstrong

Publisher: Milliken Publishing Company

ISBN: 0787706302

Category: Education

Page: 32

View: 9167

Our popular Illuminating History series is now available with PowerPoint CDs! Each 32-page book includes a CD with 8 full-color illustrations and corresponding blackline reproducible pages in a PowerPoint format. You can now use your ink-jet or laser printer to produce both reproducible worksheets and color images. Since printed worksheets are also bound in the book, you can always make copies with a photocopier. For classrooms, the illustrations can be printed on plastic fur use with an overhead projector, or they can be shown as a PowerPoint presentation on computer monitors and multimedia projectors. Each 32 worksheet pages, 8 color illustrations

The Works of John C. Calhoun: Speeches ... delivered in the House of Representatives and in the Senate of the United States

Author: John Caldwell Calhoun,Richard Kenner Crallé

Publisher: N.A

ISBN: N.A

Category: United States

Page: N.A

View: 734

The Works of John C. Calhoun: Speeches delivered in the House of Representatives and in the Senate of the United States

Author: Richard Kenner Crallé

Publisher: N.A

ISBN: N.A

Category: United States

Page: N.A

View: 2798

The works of John C. Calhoun [ed. by R.K. Crallé].

Author: Richard Kenner Crallé

Publisher: N.A

ISBN: N.A

Category:

Page: N.A

View: 8206

The Roots of Southern Writing

Essays on the Literature of the American South

Author: C. Hugh Holman

Publisher: University of Georgia Press

ISBN: 082033359X

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 252

View: 3730

At the heart of the southern riddle you will find a union of opposites, a condition of instability, a paradox. Calm grace and raw hatred. Polished manners and violence. An intense individualism and intense group pressures toward conformity. A reverence to the point of idolatry of self-determining action and a caste and class structure presupposing an aristocratic hierarchy. A passion for political action and a willingness to surrender to the enslavement of demagogues. A love of the nation intense enough to make the South's fighting men notorious in our wars and the advocacy of interposition and of the public defiance of national law. A region breeding both Thomas Jefferson and John C. Calhoun. If these contradictions are to be brought in focus, if these ambiguities are to be resolved, it must be through the 'reconciliation of opposites.' And the reconciliation of opposites, as Coleridge has told us, is the function of the poet. So begins the first of these seventeen penetrating essays drawn from long and fruitful reflection of southern life and art by C. Hugh Holman. Professor Holman maintains that there is a congeries of characteristics identifiably present in much southern writing, and he astutely defines them in this collection. William Gilmore Simms, Ellen Glasgow, Thomas Wolfe, William Faulkner, and Flannery O'Connor are treated at length. Among the other authors considered in terms of their roles in the making of the southern mind are James Branch Cabell, T.S. Stribling, Erskine Caldwell, and Robert Penn Warren. The essays strike a fine balance between general overview and specific analysis, and they are so arranged as to make a unified study which forms a significant chapter in the intellectual history of the South. Professor Holman asserts that "out of the cauldron of the South's experience, the southern writer has fashioned tragic grandeur and given it as a gift to his fellow Americans. It is possible that no other southern accomplishment will equal it in enduring importance. As urbanization and industrialism conspire to write an 'Epitaph for Dixie,' its greatest contribution to mankind may well be the lesson of its history and the drama of its suffering." In these superb essays the author makes a convincing argument for that position.

The Reintegration of American History

Slavery and the Civil War

Author: William W. Freehling

Publisher: Oxford University Press on Demand

ISBN: 9780195088083

Category: Social Science

Page: 321

View: 9503

A collection of essays on slavery in the Old South, including Denmark Vesey.

Reading the Roots

American Nature Writing Before Walden

Author: Michael P. Branch

Publisher: University of Georgia Press

ISBN: 9780820325484

Category: Nature

Page: 408

View: 9184

Reading the Roots is an unprecedented anthology of outstanding early writings about American nature--a rich, influential, yet critically underappreciated body of work. Rather than begin with Henry David Thoreau, who is often identified as the progenitor of American nature writing, editor Michael P. Branch instead surveys the long tradition that prefigures and anticipates Thoreau and his literary descendants. The selections in Reading the Roots describe a diversity of landscapes, wildlife, and natural phenomena, and their authors represent many different nationalities, cultural affiliations, religious views, and ideological perspectives. The writings gathered here also range widely in terms of subject, rhetorical form, and disciplinary approach--from promotional tracts and European narratives of contact with Native Americans to examples of scientific theology and romantic nature writing. The volume also includes a critical introduction discussing the cultural, scientific, and literary value of early American nature writing; headnotes that contextualize all authors and selections; and a substantial bibliography of primary and secondary sources in the field. Reading the Roots at last makes early American landscapes--and a range of literary responses to them--accessible to scholars, students, and general readers.

Prelude to Civil War

The Nullification Controversy in South Carolina, 1816-1836

Author: William W. Freehling

Publisher: Oxford University Press, USA

ISBN: 9780195076813

Category: History

Page: 395

View: 6422

When William Freehling's Prelude to Civil War first appeared in 1965 it was immediately hailed as a brilliant and incisive study of the origins of the Civil War. Book Week called it "fresh, exciting, and convincing," while The Virginia Quarterly Review praised it as, quite simply, "history at its best." It was equally well-received by historical societies, garnering the Allan Nevins History Prize as well as a Bancroft Prize, the most prestigious history award of all. Now once again available, Prelude to Civil War is still the definitive work on the subject, and one of the most important in ante-bellum studies. It tells the story of the Nullification Controversy in South Carolina, describing how from 1816 to 1836 aristocratic planters of the Palmetto State tumbled from a contented and prosperous life of elegant balls and fine Madeira wines to a world rife with economic distress, guilt over slavery, and apprehension of slave rebellion. It shows in compelling detail how this reversal of fortune led the political leaders of South Carolina down the path to ever more radical states rights doctrines: in 1832 they were seeking to nullify federal law by refusing to obey it; four years later some of them were considering secession. As the story unfolds, we meet a colorful and skillfully drawn cast of characters, among them John C. Calhoun, who hoped nullifcation would save both his highest priority, slavery, and his next priority, union; President Andrew Jackson, who threatened to hang Calhoun and lead federal troops into South Carolina; Denmark Vesey, who organized and nearly brought off a slave conspiracy; and Martin Van Buren, the "Little Magician," who plotted craftily to replace Calhoun in Jackson's esteem. These and other important figures come to life in these pages, and help to tell a tale--often in their own words--central to an understanding of the war which eventually engulfed the United States. Demonstrating how a profound sensitivity to the still-shadowy slavery issue--not serious economic problems alone--led to the Nullification Controversy, Freehling revises many theories previously held by historians. He describes how fear of abolitionists and their lobbying power in Congress prompted South Carolina's leaders to ban virtually any public discussion of the South's "peculiar institution," and shows that while the Civil War had many beginnings, none was more significant than this single, passionate controversy. Written in a lively and eminently readable style, Prelude to Civil War is must reading for anyone trying to discover the roots of the conflict that soon would tear the Union apart.

Religion and the American Civil War

Author: Randall M. Miller,Harry S. Stout,Charles Reagan Wilson

Publisher: Oxford University Press

ISBN: 0199923663

Category: History

Page: 448

View: 4156

The sixteen essays in this volume, all previously unpublished, address the little considered question of the role played by religion in the American Civil War. The authors show that religion, understood in its broadest context as a culture and community of faith, was found wherever the war was found. Comprising essays by such scholars as Elizabeth Fox-Genovese, Drew Gilpin Faust, Mark Noll, Reid Mitchell, Harry Stout, and Bertram Wyatt-Brown, and featuring an afterword by James McPherson, this collection marks the first step towards uncovering this crucial yet neglected aspect of American history.

The Jeffersonian Vision, 1801-1815

The Art of American Power During the Early Republic

Author: William R. Nester

Publisher: Potomac Books, Inc.

ISBN: 1597978957

Category: Biography & Autobiography

Page: 277

View: 1296

The Jeffersonian Vision, 1801-1815, reveals how the nation's leaders understood and asserted power during those crucial years between Thomas Jefferson's inauguration as the third president and the firing of the last shots at the Battle of New Orleans. Seeking to overcome the bitter political animosities that had plagued the years leading up to his presidency, Jefferson declared in his inaugural address that "we are all Federalists, we are all Republicans." His words proved to be prescient. The Republican Party, soon to be renamed the Democratic Party, would dominate American politics for another half century. Most Americans laud Jefferson's presidency for the purchase of the Louisiana Territory, which extended the United States westward to the Rocky Mountains, and for the launch of the Lewis and Clark expedition, which journeyed to the Pacific Ocean and back. But critics then and since have blasted Jefferson and his immediate successor, James Madison, for a series of ideologically driven blunders. Jefferson envisioned a largely autarkic nation with yeoman farmers serving as its economic and political backbone. That notion was at odds with an America whose wealth was increasingly gleaned from foreign markets. The Republican policy of wielding partial or complete trade embargos as a diplomatic weapon repeatedly backfired, inflicting grievous damage on America's economy and culminating with an unnecessary war with Britain that was devastating to America's power and wealth, if not its honor. Despite their philosophical and political differences, Federalists and Republicans alike proved capable enough at the art of power when they headed the nation. They implemented a spectrum of mostly appropriate means, first to win independence and then to consolidate and eventually expand American wealth and territory. Readers today will recognize the roots of red state/blue state conflict in these earliest competing visions of the roots of American power - and of what America might be. -- Book jacket.

From Democracy's Roots to a Country Divided

America from 1816 to 1850

Author: Britannica Educational Publishing

Publisher: Britannica Educational Publishing

ISBN: 1615307354

Category: Juvenile Nonfiction

Page: 160

View: 4120

Characterized largely by expansionism, economic growth, and social and political reform, the period in American history following the War of 1812 proved advantageous to a number of Americans. Even as many industries flourished, political unrest remained on the horizon as legislators debated the issue of slavery and the handling of newly acquired territories. Complete with eyewitness descriptions of key events and issues as well as seminal documents of the time, this absorbing volume recounts the historical, cultural, economic, and political developments of the United States in the decades leading up to the Civil War.

The U.S. South and Europe

Transatlantic Relations in the Nineteenth and Twentieth Centuries

Author: Cornelis A. van Minnen,Manfred Berg

Publisher: University Press of Kentucky

ISBN: 0813143187

Category: History

Page: 316

View: 1249

The U.S. South is a distinctive political and cultural force -- not only in the eyes of Americans, but also in the estimation of many Europeans. The region played a distinctive role as a major agricultural center and the source of much of the wealth in early America, but it has also served as a catalyst for the nation's only civil war, and later, as a battleground in violent civil rights conflicts. Once considered isolated and benighted by the international community, the South has recently evoked considerable interest among popular audiences and academic observers on both sides of the Atlantic. In The U.S. South and Europe, editors Cornelis A. van Minnen and Manfred Berg have assembled contributions that interpret a number of political, cultural, and religious aspects of the transatlantic relationship during the nineteenth and twentieth centuries. The contributors discuss a variety of subjects, including European colonization, travel accounts of southerners visiting Europe, and the experiences of German immigrants who settled in the South. The collection also examines slavery, foreign recognition of the Confederacy as a sovereign government, the lynching of African Americans and Italian immigrants, and transatlantic religious fundamentalism. Finally, it addresses international perceptions of the Jim Crow South and the civil rights movement as a framework for understanding race relations in the United Kingdom after World War II. Featuring contributions from leading scholars based in the United States and Europe, this illuminating volume explores the South from an international perspective and offers a new context from which to consider the region's history.

The Causes of the Civil War

Revised Edition

Author: Kenneth Stampp

Publisher: Simon and Schuster

ISBN: 0671751557

Category: History

Page: 255

View: 7029

Gathers original sources, including newspaper editorials, speeches, and documents, and shares comments by historians on the period

History of Pennsylvania

Author: Philip S. Klein,Ari Arthur Hoogenboom

Publisher: Penn State Press

ISBN: 9780271038391

Category: History

Page: N.A

View: 4584

That Pride of Race and Character

The Roots of Jewish Benevolence in the Jim Crow South

Author: Caroline E. Light

Publisher: NYU Press

ISBN: 1479835773

Category: History

Page: 304

View: 967

“It has ever been the boast of the Jewish people, that they support their own poor,” declared Kentucky attorney Benjamin Franklin Jonas in 1856. “Their reasons are partly founded in religious necessity, and partly in that pride of race and character which has supported them through so many ages of trial and vicissitude.” In That Pride of Race and Character, Caroline E. Light examines the American Jewish tradition of benevolence and charity and explores its southern roots. Light provides a critical analysis of benevolence as it was inflected by regional ideals of race and gender, showing how a southern Jewish benevolent empire emerged in response to the combined pressures of post-Civil War devastation and the simultaneous influx of eastern European immigration. In an effort to combat the voices of anti-Semitism and nativism, established Jewish leaders developed a sophisticated and cutting-edge network of charities in the South to ensure that Jews took care of those considered “their own” while also proving themselves to be exemplary white citizens. Drawing from confidential case files and institutional records from various southern Jewish charities, the book relates how southern Jewish leaders and their immigrant clients negotiated the complexities of “fitting in” in a place and time of significant socio-political turbulence. Ultimately, the southern Jewish call to benevolence bore the particular imprint of the region’s racial mores and left behind a rich legacy.

Clausewitz and America

Strategic Thought and Practice from Vietnam to Iraq

Author: Stuart Kinross

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 1134180284

Category: History

Page: 256

View: 9091

This book demonstrates how Clausewitzian thought influenced American strategic thinking between the Vietnam War and the current conflict in Iraq. Carl von Clausewitz's thought played a part in the process of military reform and the transition in US policy that took place after the Vietnam War. By the time of the 1991 Gulf War, American policy makers demonstrated that they understood the Clausewitzian notion of utilizing military force to fulfil a clear political objective. The US armed forces bridged the operational and strategic levels during that conflict in accordance with Clausewitz’s conviction that war plans should be tailored to fulfil a political objective. With the end of the Cold War, and an increasing predilection for technological solutions, American policy makers and the military moved away from Clausewitz. It was only the events of 11 September 2001 that reminded Americans of his intrinsic value. However, while many aspects of the ‘War on Terror’ and the conflict in Iraq can be accommodated within the Clausewitzian paradigm, the lack of a clear policy for countering insurgency in Iraq suggests that the US may have returned full circle to the flawed strategic approach evident in Vietnam. Clausewitz and America will be of great interest to students of strategy, military history, international security and US politics.

The Oxford Encyclopedia of the Civil War

Author: William L. Barney

Publisher: Oxford University Press

ISBN: 0199890242

Category: History

Page: 384

View: 1385

A gold mine for the historian as well as the Civil War buff, The Oxford Encyclopedia of the Civil War offers a concise, comprehensive overview of the major personalities and pivotal events of the war that redefined the American nation. Drawing upon recent research that has moved beyond battles and military campaigns to address the significant roles played by civilians, women, and African Americans, the 250 entries explore the era in all its complexity and unmistakable human drama. Here of course are the major battles and campaigns, ranging from Gettysburg and Shiloh to Sherman's March to the Sea, as well as biographical entries on everyone from Abraham Lincoln and Robert E. Lee to Frederick Douglass, Clara Barton, and Walt Whitman. But the book also features entries on a wealth of other matters--music, photography, religion, economics, foreign affairs, medicine, prisons, legislative landmarks, military terms and weaponry, political events, social reform, women in the war, and much more. In addition, charts, newly commissioned maps, chronologies, and period photographs provide an appealing visual context. Suggestions for further reading at the end of most entries and a guide to more general sources in an appendix introduce the reader to the literature on a specific topic. A list of Civil War museums and historic sites and a representative sampling of Civil War websites also point to resources that can be tailored to individual interests. A quick, convenient, user-friendly guide to all facets of the Civil War, this new updated edition also serves as an invaluable gateway to the rich historical record now available, perfect for virtually anyone who wants to learn more about this tumultuous period in our history.

American Pests

The Losing War on Insects from Colonial Times to DDT

Author: James E. McWilliams

Publisher: Columbia University Press

ISBN: 0231511361

Category: Science

Page: 312

View: 4436

The world of insects is one we only dimly understand. Yet from using arsenic, cobalt, and quicksilver to kill household infiltrators to employing the sophisticated tools of the Orkin Man, Americans have fought to eradicate the "bugs" they have learned to hate. Inspired by the still-revolutionary theories of Rachel Carson's Silent Spring, James E. McWilliams argues for a more harmonious and rational approach to our relationship with insects, one that does not harm our environment and, consequently, ourselves along the way. Beginning with the early techniques of colonial farmers and ending with the modern use of chemical insecticides, McWilliams deftly shows how America's war on insects mirrors its continual struggle with nature, economic development, technology, and federal regulation. He reveals a very American paradox: the men and women who settled and developed this country sought to control the environment and achieve certain economic goals; yet their methods of agricultural expansion undermined their efforts and linked them even closer to the inexorable realities of the insect world. As told from the perspective of the often flamboyant actors in the battle against insects, American Pests is a fascinating investigation into the attitudes, policies, and practices that continue to influence our behavior toward insects. Asking us to question, if not abandon, our reckless (and sometimes futile) attempts at insect control, McWilliams convincingly argues that insects, like people, have an inherent right to exist and that in our attempt to rid ourselves of insects, we compromise the balance of nature.

The Gingrich Senators

The Roots of Partisan Warfare in Congress

Author: Sean M. Theriault

Publisher: Oxford University Press

ISBN: 0199307474

Category: Political Science

Page: 240

View: 8957

The Senate of the mid twentieth century, which was venerated by journalists, historians, and senators alike, is today but a distant memory. Electioneering on the Senate floor, playing games with the legislative process, and questioning your fellow senators' motives have become commonplace. In this book, noted political scientist Sean Theriault documents the Senate's demise over the last 30 years by showing how one group of senators has been at the forefront of this transformation. He calls this group the "Gingrich Senators" and defines them as Republican senators who previously served in the House after 1978, the year of Newt Gingrich's first election to the House. He shows how the Gingrich Senators are more conservative, more likely to engage in tactics that obstruct the legislative process, and more likely to oppose Democratic presidents than even their fellow other Republicans. Phil Gramm, Rick Santorum, Jim DeMint, and Tom Coburn are just four examples of the group that has includes 40 total senators and 22 currently serving senators. Theriault first documents the ideological distinctiveness of the Gingrich Senators and examines possible explanations for it. He then shows how the Gingrich Senators behave as partisan warriors, which has radically transformed the way the Senate operates as an institution, by using cutthroat tactics, obstructionism, and legislative games. He concludes the book by examining the fate of the Gingrich Senators and the future of the U.S. Senate.

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