Landscape And Identity In North America S Southern Colonies From 1660 To 1745 PDF EPUB Download

Landscape And Identity In North America S Southern Colonies From 1660 To 1745 also available in docx and mobi. Read Landscape And Identity In North America S Southern Colonies From 1660 To 1745 online, read in mobile or Kindle.

Landscape and Identity in North America's Southern Colonies from 1660 to 1745

Author: Catherine Armstrong

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN:

Category: History

Page: 226

View: 462

Through an analysis of textual representations of the American landscape, this book looks at how North America appeared in books printed on both sides of the Atlantic between the years 1660 and 1745. A variety of literary genres are examined to discover how authors described the landscape, climate, flora and fauna of America, particularly of the new southern colonies of Carolina and Georgia. Chapters are arranged thematically, each exploring how the relationship between English and American print changed over the 85 years under consideration. Beginning in 1660 with the impact of the Restoration on the colonial relationship, the book moves on to show how the expansion of British settlement in this period coincided with a dramatic increase in the production and consumption of the printed word and the further development of religious and scientific explanations of landscape change and climactic events. This in turn led to multiple interpretations of the American landscape dependent on factors such as whether the writer had actually visited America or not, differing purposes for writing, growing imperial considerations, and conflict with the French, Spanish and Natives. The book concludes by bringing together the three key themes: how representations of landscape varied depending on the genre of literature in which they appeared; that an author's perceived self-definition (as English resident, American visitor or American resident) determined his understanding of the American landscape; and finally that the development of a unique American identity by the mid-eighteenth century can be seen by the way American residents define the landscape and their relationship to it.

African Americans in the Colonial Era

From African Origins through the American Revolution

Author: Donald R. Wright

Publisher: John Wiley & Sons

ISBN:

Category: History

Page: 312

View: 947

What are the origins of slavery and race-based prejudice in the mainland American colonies? How did the Atlantic slave trade operate to supply African labor to colonial America? How did African-American culture form and evolve? How did the American Revolution affect men and women of African descent? Previous editions of this work depicted African-Americans in the American mainland colonies as their contemporaries saw them: as persons from one of the four continents who interacted economically, socially, and politically in a vast, complex Atlantic world. It showed how the society that resulted in colonial America reflected the mix of Atlantic cultures and that a group of these people eventually used European ideas to support creation of a favorable situation for those largely of European descent, omitting Africans, who constituted their primary labor force. In this fourth edition of African Americans in the Colonial Era: From African Origins through the American Revolution, acclaimed scholar Donald R. Wright offers new interpretations to provide a clear understanding of the Atlantic slave trade and the nature of the early African-American experience. This revised edition incorporates the latest data, a fresh Atlantic perspective, and an updated bibliographical essay to thoroughly explore African-Americans’ African origins, their experience crossing the Atlantic, and their existence in colonial America in a broadened, more nuanced way.

Between Two Worlds

How the English Became Americans

Author: Malcolm Gaskill

Publisher: OUP Oxford

ISBN:

Category: History

Page: 480

View: 268

Between Two Worlds is a story teeming with people on the move, making decisions, indulging or resisting their desires and dreams. In the seventeenth century a quarter of a million men, women, and children left England's shores for America. Some were explorers and merchants, others soldiers and missionaries; many were fugitives from poverty and persecution. All, in their own way, were adventurers, risking their lives and fortunes to make something of themselves overseas. They irrevocably changed the land and indigenous peoples they encountered - and their new world changed them. But that was only half the story. The plantations established from Maine to the Caribbean needed support at home, especially royal endorsement and money, which made adventurers of English monarchs and investors too. Attitudes to America were crucial, and evolved as the colonies grew in size, prosperity, and self-confidence. Meanwhile, for those who had crossed the ocean, America forced people to rethink the country in which they had been raised, and to which they remained attached after emigration. In tandem with new ideas about the New World, migrants pondered their English mother country's traditions and achievements, its problems and its uncertain future in an age of war and revolution. Using hundreds of letters, journals, reports, pamphlets and contemporary books, Between Two Worlds recreates this fascinating transatlantic history - one which has often been neglected or misunderstood on both sides of the Atlantic in the centuries since.

The Atlantic Experience

Peoples, Places, Ideas

Author: Catherine Armstrong

Publisher: Macmillan International Higher Education

ISBN:

Category: History

Page: 260

View: 494

Providing a succinct yet comprehensive introduction to the history of the Atlantic world in its entirety, The Atlantic Experience traces the first Portuguese journeys to the West coast of Africa in the mid-fifteenth century through to the abolition of slavery in America in the late-nineteenth century. Bringing together the histories of Europe, Africa and the Americas, this book supersedes a history of nations, foregrounds previously neglected parts of these continents, and explores the region as a holistic entity that encompassed people from many different areas, ethnic groups and national backgrounds. Distilling this huge topic into key themes such as conquest, trade, race and migration, Catherine Armstrong and Laura Chmielewski's chronological survey illuminates the crucial aspects of this cutting edge field.

Text and Image in the City

Manuscript, Print and Visual Culture in Urban Space

Author: John Hinks

Publisher: Cambridge Scholars Publishing

ISBN:

Category: Social Science

Page: 190

View: 443

The essays in this collection discuss how the city is ‘textualized’, and address many aspects of how texts and images are written and produced in, and about, cities. They demonstrate how urban texts and images provoke reactions, in city-dwellers, visitors, civic and political actors, that, in turn, impact upon the shape of the city itself. Many kinds of urban texts – both manuscript and print – are discussed, including chapbooks, periodicals, poetry, graffiti and street-signs. The essays derive from a range of disciplines including book history, urban history, cultural history, literary studies, art history and urban planning, and explore some key questions in urban cultural history, including the relationship between text, image and the city; the function of the text or image within an urban environment; how urban texts and images have been used by those in positions of power and by those with little or no power; the ways in which urban identity and values have been reflected in ‘street literature’, graffiti and subversive texts and images; and whether theories of urban space can help us to understand the relationship between text, image and the city. As such, this volume will serve to enhance the reader’s understanding of the nature of urbanism from a historical perspective, the creation and representation of urban space, and the processes of urbanization. It investigates how the creation, distribution and consumption of urban texts and images actively affect the shaping of the city itself – a mutually constitutive process whereby text, image and city create and sustain each other.

America, History and Life

Author:

Publisher:

ISBN:

Category: Canada

Page:

View: 753

Article abstracts and citations of reviews and dissertations covering the United States and Canada.

The History of British Art: The history of British art, 600-1600

Author:

Publisher:

ISBN:

Category: Art

Page:

View: 295

The History of British Art: The history of British art, 1600-1870

Author: David Bindman

Publisher: Yc British Art

ISBN:

Category: Art

Page: 247

View: 907

An array of international experts tells the story of art in Britain from the post-Reformation period through to the birth of the modern era. The momentous changes that shook Britain--from the Civil Wars to the emergence of the British Empire--all had effects on its art and culture. With clarity and incisive scholarship, this volume offers a new appreciation of the work of artists from Van Dyck to the Pre-Raphaelites.

Dissertation Abstracts International

The humanities and social sciences

Author:

Publisher:

ISBN:

Category: Humanities

Page:

View: 968

Choice

A Classified Cumulation : Volumes 1-10, March 1964--February 1974

Author: Richard K. Gardner

Publisher:

ISBN:

Category: Best books

Page:

View: 905

Best Books