Search Results: law-and-american-histopry

Law and War

International Law and American History

Author: Peter Maguire

Publisher: Columbia University Press

ISBN: 0231518196

Category: Political Science

Page: 360

View: 5103

In this classic text, Peter Maguire follows America's legal relationship with war, both before and after the Nuremberg trials of the 1940s. Maguire argues that the precedents set by the trials were nothing less than revolutionary, and he traces the development of these new attitudes throughout American history. The text has been revised throughout, with a new preface and postscript discussing the George W. Bush administration's attempt to rewrite the laws of war after 9/11. Maguire connects these efforts to the decline in American power and reputation. Praise for the previous edition: "[An] intriguing historical analysis."—Harvard Law Review "Outstanding... impressive... a terrific book."—American Historical Review "A five-star accomplishment that will intrigue the reader and prove that, in history, truth is often more fascinating than fiction."—H. W. William Caming, former Nuremberg prosecutor "Perceptive."—Journal of American History "An important and fascinating study, marked by impressive research and moral passion."—Ronald Steel, University of Southern California "A 'must read' for all those interested in international criminal law, war crimes, and war crime trials."—J. C. Watkins Jr., University of Alabama "A sobering exploration of the hypocrisy and double standards that shape the laws of war. Maguire reveals the conflict between American ideology and American imperialism, the Faustian compromises made by our leaders during their elusive quest for justice."—Iris Chang, author of The Rape of Nanking "A pioneering account.... Law and War goes back to the middle of the nineteenth century to trace the history of modern war crimes, their shock value, and the efforts made to bring their perpetrators to account."—Thomas Keenan, Bardian

Race on Trial

Law and Justice in American History

Author: Annette Gordon-Reed

Publisher: Oxford University Press

ISBN: 9780198028666

Category: Social Science

Page: 248

View: 9914

is book of twelve original essays will bring together two themes of American culture: law and race. The essays fall into four groups: cases that are essential to the history of race in America; cases that illustrate the treatment of race in American history; cases of great fame that became the trials of the century of their time; and cases that made important law. Some of the cases discussed include Amistad, Dred Scott, Plessy v. Ferguson, Scottsboro, Korematsu v. US, Brown v. Board, Loving v. Virginia, Regents v. Bakke, and OJ Simpson. All illustrate how race often determined the outcome of trials, and how trials that confront issues of racism provide a unique lens on American cultural history. Cases include African-Americans, Asian-Americans, and Caucasians. Contributors include a mix of junior and senior scholars in law schools and history departments.

Law in American History

Volume 1: From the Colonial Years Through the Civil War

Author: G. Edward White

Publisher: Oxford University Press

ISBN: 0195102479

Category: History

Page: 565

View: 7243

G. Edward White, a leading legal historian, presents Law in American History, a two-volume, comprehensive narrative history of American law from the colonial period to the present. In this first volume, White explores the key turning points in roughly the first half of the American legal system, from the development of order in the colonies, to the signing of the Constitution, to the dissolution of the Union just before the Civil War. Thought-provoking and artfully written, Law in American History, Vol. 1 is an essential text for both students of law and general readers alike.

Law in American History

From Reconstruction Through the 1920s

Author: G. Edward White

Publisher: Oxford University Press

ISBN: 0199930988

Category:

Page: 672

View: 5759

In this second installment of G. Edward White's sweeping history of law in America from the colonial era to the present, White, covers the period between 1865-1929, which encompasses Reconstruction, rapid industrialization, a huge influx of immigrants, the rise of Jim Crow, the emergence of an American territorial empire, World War I, and the booming yet xenophobic 1920s. As in the first volume, he connects the evolution of American law to the major political, economic, cultural, social, and demographic developments of the era. To enrich his account, White draws from the latest research from across the social sciences--economic history, anthropology, and sociology--yet weave those insights into a highly accessible narrative. Along the way he provides a compelling case for why law can be seen as the key to understanding the development of American life as we know it. Law in American History, Volume II will be an essential text for both students of law and general readers.

Law in antebellum society

essay and materials in law and American history

Author: Jamil S. Zainaldin,American Bar Association. Commission on Undergraduate Education in Law and the Humanities

Publisher: N.A

ISBN: N.A

Category: Law

Page: 215

View: 5599

Law and Religion in American History

Author: Mark Douglas McGarvie

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

ISBN: 1107150930

Category: History

Page: 312

View: 2927

This book furthers dialogue on the separation of church and state with an approach that emphasizes intellectual history and the constitutional theory that underlies American society. Mark D. McGarvie explains that the founding fathers of America considered the right of conscience to be an individual right, to be protected against governmental interference. While the religion clauses enunciated this right, its true protection occurred in the creation of separate public and private spheres. Religion and the churches were placed in the private sector. Yet, politically active Christians have intermittently mounted challenges to this bifurcation in calling for a greater public role for Christian faith and morality in American society. Both students and scholars will learn much from this intellectual history of law and religion that contextualizes a four-hundred-year-old ideological struggle.

Originalism in American Law and Politics

A Constitutional History

Author: Johnathan O'Neill,Professor Johnathan O'Neill

Publisher: JHU Press

ISBN: 9780801881114

Category: History

Page: 281

View: 5801

This book explains how the debate over originalism emerged from the interaction of constitutional theory, U.S. Supreme Court decisions, and American political development. Refuting the contention that originalism is a recent concoction of political conservatives like Robert Bork, Johnathan O'Neill asserts that recent appeals to the origin of the Constitution in Supreme Court decisions and commentary, especially by Justices Antonin Scalia and Clarence Thomas, continue an established pattern in American history. Originalism in American Law and Politics is distinguished by its historical approach to the topic. Drawing on constitutional commentary and treatises, Supreme Court and lower federal court opinions, congressional hearings, and scholarly monographs, O'Neill's work will be valuable to historians, academic lawyers, and political scientists.

History of the Law of Nations in Europe and America

From the Earliest Times to the Treaty of Washington, 1842

Author: Henry Wheaton

Publisher: N.A

ISBN: N.A

Category: Europe

Page: 797

View: 4819

Law in American History, Volume II

From Reconstruction Through the 1920s

Author: G. Edward White

Publisher: Oxford University Press

ISBN: 0199930996

Category: Law

Page: 496

View: 8648

In this second installment of G. Edward White's sweeping history of law in America from the colonial era to the present, White, covers the period between 1865-1929, which encompasses Reconstruction, rapid industrialization, a huge influx of immigrants, the rise of Jim Crow, the emergence of an American territorial empire, World War I, and the booming yet xenophobic 1920s. As in the first volume, he connects the evolution of American law to the major political, economic, cultural, social, and demographic developments of the era. To enrich his account, White draws from the latest research from across the social sciences--economic history, anthropology, and sociology--yet weave those insights into a highly accessible narrative. Along the way he provides a compelling case for why law can be seen as the key to understanding the development of American life as we know it. Law in American History, Volume II will be an essential text for both students of law and general readers.

The magic mirror

law in American history

Author: Kermit Hall,Peter Karsten

Publisher: Oxford University Press, USA

ISBN: 9780195081800

Category: Law

Page: 465

View: 2343

Now in a new edition with extensive updates by Peter Karsten, The Magic Mirror chronicles American law from its English origins to the present. It offers comprehensive treatment of twentieth-century developments and sets American law and legal institutions in the broad context of social,economic, and political events, weaving together themes from the history of both constitutional and private law. This edition of The Magic Mirror features additional coverage of resistance to law through U.S. history, the customary law of self-governing bodies, and Native Americans. It also hasupdated coverage for law in society, the legal implications of social change in areas such as criminal justice, the rights of women, blacks, the family, and children. It further examines regional differences in American legal culture, the creation of the administrative and security states, thedevelopment of American federalism, and the rise of the legal profession. The Magic Mirror pays close attention to the evolution of substantive law categories--such as contracts, torts, negotiable instruments, real property, trusts and estates, and civil procedure--and addresses the intellectualevolution of American law, surveying movements such as legal realism and critical legal studies. The authors conclude that over its history American law has been remarkably fluid, adapting in form and substance to each successive generation without ever fully resolving the underlying social andeconomic conflicts that first provoke demands for legal change.

A History of American Law, Revised Edition

Author: Lawrence M. Friedman

Publisher: Simon and Schuster

ISBN: 9781451602661

Category: Law

Page: 784

View: 6057

A History of American Law has become a classic for students of law, American history and sociology across the country. In this brilliant and immensely readable book, Lawrence M. Friedman tells the whole fascinating story of American law from its beginnings in the colonies to the present day. By showing how close the life of the law is to the economic and political life of the country, he makes a complex subject understandable and engrossing. A History of American Law presents the achievements and failures of the American legal system in the context of America's commercial and working world, family practices and attitudes toward property, slavery, government, crime and justice. Now Professor Friedman has completely revised and enlarged his landmark work, incorporating a great deal of new material. The book contains newly expanded notes, a bibliography and a bibliographical essay.

Law and order in American history

Author: Joseph M. Hawes

Publisher: Associated Faculty Pr Inc

ISBN: N.A

Category: Law

Page: 184

View: 9482

This publication presents the opinions of nine social scientists on the American criminal justice system.

Race Relations and the Law in American History

Major Historical Interpretations

Author: Kermit Hall

Publisher: Articles-Garlan

ISBN: N.A

Category: African Americans

Page: 655

View: 4450

This work is a collection of essays examining the racial issues in the constitutional and legal history of the United States after slavery. The historical evolution of legally imposed racial classification is discussed in the book.

Law in American History

Author: N.A

Publisher: N.A

ISBN: N.A

Category: Law

Page: 677

View: 5791

Law and Jurisprudence in American History

Cases and Materials

Author: Stephen B. Presser,Jamil S. Zainaldin

Publisher: West Publishing Company

ISBN: N.A

Category: Law

Page: 1139

View: 8692

Law in American History

Volume 1: From the Colonial Years Through the Civil War

Author: G. Edward White

Publisher: Oxford University Press

ISBN: 0195102479

Category: History

Page: 565

View: 3450

G. Edward White, a leading legal historian, presents Law in American History, a two-volume, comprehensive narrative history of American law from the colonial period to the present. In this first volume, White explores the key turning points in roughly the first half of the American legal system, from the development of order in the colonies, to the signing of the Constitution, to the dissolution of the Union just before the Civil War. Thought-provoking and artfully written, Law in American History, Vol. 1 is an essential text for both students of law and general readers alike.

Law in America

A Short History

Author: Lawrence M. Friedman

Publisher: Modern Library

ISBN: 1588362507

Category: History

Page: 224

View: 2679

“Law in America is a little gem. It is a peerless introduction to our legal history—concise, clear, tellingly told, and beautifully written. The greatest living historian of American law has done it again.” —Stanley N. Katz, former president of the American Society for Legal History and the Organization of American Historians “All societies have laws, but neither all laws nor all legal systems are alike. No one has thought more deeply or written more clearly about the peculiar role of law in American life than Lawrence Friedman. In this trenchant, illuminating book, he distills a lifetime of scholarship and teaching into a concise and provocative explanation of the role that law has played in shaping the distinctive contours of American history and culture.” —David M. Kennedy, professor of history at Stanford University and author of Freedom from Fear Throughout America’s history, our laws have been a reflection of who we are, of what we value, of who has control. They embody our society’s genetic code. In the masterful hands of the subject’s greatest living historian, the story of the evolution of our laws serves to lay bare the deciding struggles over power and justice that have shaped this country from its birth pangs to the present. Law in America is a supreme example of the historian’s art, its brevity a testament to the great elegance and wit of its composition.

American Law and the Constitutional Order

Historical Perspectives

Author: Lawrence Meir Friedman,Harry N. Scheiber

Publisher: Harvard University Press

ISBN: 9780674025271

Category: History

Page: 581

View: 5258

This is the standard reader in American law and constitutional development. The selections demonstrate that the legal order, once defined by society, helps in molding the various forces of the social life of that society. The essays cover the entire period of the American experience, from the colonies to postindustrial society. Additions to this enlarged edition include essays by Michael Parrish on the Depression and the New Deal; Abram Chayes on the role of the judge in public law litigation; David Vogel on social regulation; Harry N. Scheiber on doctrinal legacies and institutional innovations in the relation between law and the economy; and Lawrence M. Friedman on American legal history.

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