Search Results: lincoln-churchill

Lincoln & Churchill

Statesmen at War

Author: Lewis E. Lehrman

Publisher: Rowman & Littlefield

ISBN: 0811767450

Category: History

Page: 544

View: 9232

A Renowned Historian Gives New Perspective on Statesmen at War Lewis E. Lehrman, a renowned historian and National Humanities Medal winner, gives new perspective on two of the greatest English-speaking statesmen—and their remarkable leadership in wars of national survival Abraham Lincoln and Winston Churchill, as commanders in chief, led their nations to victory—Lincoln in the Civil War, Churchill in World War II. They became revered leaders—statesmen for all time. Yet these two world-famous war leaders have never been seriously compared at book length. Acclaimed historian Lewis Lehrman, in his pathbreaking comparison of both statesmen, finds that Lincoln and Churchill—with very different upbringings and contrasting personalities—led their war efforts, to some extent, in similar ways. As supreme war lords, they were guided not only by principles of honor, duty, freedom, but also by the practical wisdom to know when, where, and how to apply these principles. They made mistakes which Lehrman considers carefully. But the author emphasizes that, despite setbacks, they never gave up. Even their writings and speeches were swords in battle. Gifted literary stylists, both men relied on the written and spoken word to steel their citizens throughout desperate and prolonged wars. Both statesmen unexpectedly left office near the end of their wars—Lincoln by the bullet, Churchill by the ballot.

Speak Like Churchill, Stand Like Lincoln

21 Powerful Secrets of History's Greatest Speakers

Author: James C. Humes

Publisher: Three Rivers Press

ISBN: 9780307559913

Category: Language Arts & Disciplines

Page: 224

View: 1075

Turn Any Presentation into a Landmark Occasion Ever wish you could captivate your boardroom with the opening line of your presentation, like Winston Churchill in his most memorable speeches? Or want to command attention by looming larger than life before your audience, much like Abraham Lincoln when, standing erect and wearing a top hat, he towered over seven feet? Now, you can master presentation skills, wow your audience, and shoot up the corporate ladder by unlocking the secrets of history's greatest speakers. Author, historian, and world-renowned speaker James C. Humes—who wrote speeches for five American presidents—shows you how great leaders through the ages used simple yet incredibly effective tricks to speak, persuade, and win throngs of fans and followers. Inside, you'll discover how Napoleon Bonaparte mastered the use of the pregnant pause to grab attention, how Lady Margaret Thatcher punctuated her most serious speeches with the use of subtle props, how Ronald Reagan could win even the most hostile crowd with carefully timed wit, and much, much more. Whether you're addressing a small nation or a large staff meeting, you'll want to master the tips and tricks in Speak Like Churchill, Stand Like Lincoln. "As a student of speech, I very much enjoyed this intriguing historic approach to public speaking. Humes creates a valuable and practical guide." —Roger Ailes, chairman and CEO, FOX News "I love this book. I've followed Humes's lessons for years, and he combines them all into one compact, hard-hitting resource. Get this book on your desk now." —Chris Matthews, Hardball

A First-Rate Madness

Uncovering the Links Between Leadership and Mental Illness

Author: Nassir Ghaemi

Publisher: Penguin

ISBN: 110151759X

Category: Political Science

Page: 352

View: 5559

This New York Times bestseller is a myth-shattering exploration of the powerful connections between mental illness and leadership. Historians have long puzzled over the apparent mental instability of great and terrible leaders alike: Napoleon, Lincoln, Churchill, Hitler, and others. In A First-Rate Madness, Nassir Ghaemi, director of the Mood Disorders Programme at Tufts Medical Center, offers and sets forth a controversial, compelling thesis: the very qualities that mark those with mood disorders also make for the best leaders in times of crisis. From the importance of Lincoln's "depressive realism" to the lacklustre leadership of exceedingly sane men as Neville Chamberlain, A First-Rate Madness overturns many of our most cherished perceptions about greatness and the mind.

Supreme Command

Soldiers, Statesmen and Leadership in Wartime

Author: Eliot A. Cohen

Publisher: Simon and Schuster

ISBN: 074324222X

Category: History

Page: 304

View: 9567

The relationship between military leaders and political leaders has always been a complicated one, especially in times of war. When the chips are down, who should run the show -- the politicians or the generals? In Supreme Command, Eliot Cohen examines four great democratic war statesmen -- Abraham Lincoln, Georges Clemenceau, Winston Churchill, and David Ben-Gurion -- to reveal the surprising answer: the politicians. Great states-men do not turn their wars over to their generals, and then stay out of their way. Great statesmen make better generals of their generals. They question and drive their military men, and at key times they overrule their advice. The generals may think they know how to win, but the statesmen are the ones who see the big picture. Lincoln, Clemenceau, Churchill, and Ben-Gurion led four very different kinds of democracy, under the most difficult circumstances imaginable. They came from four very different backgrounds -- backwoods lawyer, dueling French doctor, rogue aristocrat, and impoverished Jewish socialist.Yet they faced similar challenges, not least the possibility that their conduct of the war could bring about their fall from power. Each exhibited mastery of detail and fascination with technology. All four were great learners, who studied war as if it were their own profession, and in many ways mastered it as well as did their generals. All found themselves locked in conflict with military men. All four triumphed. Military men often dismiss politicians as meddlers, doves, or naifs. Yet military men make mistakes. The art of a great leader is to push his subordinates to achieve great things. The lessons of the book apply not just to President Bush and other world leaders in the war on terrorism, but to anyone who faces extreme adversity at the head of a free organization -- including leaders and managers throughout the corporate world. The lessons of Supreme Command will be immediately apparent to all managers and leaders, as well as students of history.

The Literary Churchill

Author, Reader, Actor

Author: Jonathan Rose

Publisher: Yale University Press

ISBN: 0300204078

Category: Biography & Autobiography

Page: 528

View: 4038

Examines Winston Churchill's careers as a statesman and author through his love of reading, theater, and history.

Leadership in War

From Lincoln to Churchill

Author: Correlli Barnett

Publisher: N.A

ISBN: 9781473821224

Category: Electronic books

Page: 320

View: 7426

In this controversial study, Correlli Barnett examines the strengths and weaknesses of twenty wartime leaders in the nineteenth and early twentieth centuries. He considers the extraordinary difficulties they faced, and analyses how they performed and what they achieved. Were they successful, or were they beaten down by the burden of their roles? His book focuses on men from very different backgrounds and from three continents in a range of modern conflicts from the American Civil War to the Second World War. They range from statesmen like Lincoln, Lloyd George, Hitler and Churchill to generals like Grant, Haig, Rommel, Zhukov and Eisenhower, and admirals like Yamamoto and Ramsay. These leaders demonstrated fascinating contrasts of personal character, styles of leadership and aptitude for command as they grappled with the daunting professional problems that confronted them.

Churchill, Roosevelt & Company

Studies in Character and Statecraft

Author: Lewis E. Lehrman

Publisher: Rowman & Littlefield

ISBN: 0811765474

Category: History

Page: 400

View: 7227

During World War II the “special relationship” between the United States and Great Britain cemented the alliance that won the war. But the ultimate victory of that partnership has obscured many of the conflicts behind Franklin Roosevelt’s grins and Winston Churchill’s victory signs, the clashes of principles and especially personalities between and within the two nations. Synthesizing an impressive variety of sources from memoirs and letters to histories and biographies, Lewis Lehrman explains how the Anglo-American alliance worked--and occasionally did not work--by presenting portraits and case studies of the men who worked the back channels and back rooms, the secretaries and under secretaries, ambassadors and ministers, responsible for carrying out Roosevelt’s and Churchill’s agendas while also pursuing their own and thwarting others’. This was the domain of Joseph Kennedy, American ambassador to England often at odds with his boss; spymasters William Donovan and William Stephenson; Secretary of State Cordell Hull, whom FDR frequently bypassed in favor of Under Secretary Sumner Welles; British ambassadors Lord Lothian and Lord Halifax; and, above them all, Roosevelt and Churchill, who had the difficult task, not always well performed, of managing their subordinates and who frequently chose to conduct foreign policy directly between themselves. Scrupulous in its research and fair in its judgments, Lehrman’s book reveals the personal diplomacy at the core of the Anglo-American alliance.

Churchill

Visionary. Statesman. Historian

Author: John Lukacs

Publisher: Yale University Press

ISBN: 9780300103021

Category: History

Page: 202

View: 9149

"Each chapter of this book provides an essential portrait of Churchill at the height of his powers. In addition to vividly depicting his relationships with Stalin, Roosevelt, Eisenhower, and other world leaders, Lukacs reflects on Churchill's ability to foresee the coming of World War II and the Cold War; he weighs Churchill's stature as a historian looking backward at the conflicts of which he was so much a part; and he examines the often contradictory ways Churchill has been perceived by critics and admirers alike. The last chapter is a powerful and deeply moving evocation of the three days Lukacs spent in London attending Churchill's funeral in 1965, and it offers a final assessment of Churchill's place in history through the prism of the varied individuals who came to honor him after his death. In Churchill: Visionary. Statesman. Historian., Luckacs sets forth the essence of this towering figure with consummate mastery."--BOOK JACKET.

Lincoln's Melancholy

How Depression Challenged a President and Fueled His Greatness

Author: Joshua Wolf Shenk

Publisher: Houghton Mifflin Harcourt

ISBN: 9780618773442

Category: Biography & Autobiography

Page: 350

View: 7935

A reassessment of the life of Abraham Lincoln argues that America's sixteenth president suffered from depression and explains how Lincoln used the coping strategies he had developed to face the crises of the Civil War and personal tragedy.

Lincoln at Peoria

The Turning Point

Author: Lewis E. Lehrman

Publisher: Stackpole Books

ISBN: 9780811741033

Category: History

Page: 400

View: 3168

The pivotal speech that changed the course of Lincoln's career and America's history. Complete examination of the speech, including the full text delivered in 1854 in Peoria, Illinois.

Presidential Command

Author: Peter W. Rodman

Publisher: Vintage

ISBN: 0307271285

Category: History

Page: 352

View: 8597

An official in the Nixon, Ford, Reagan, and both Bush administrations, Peter W. Rodman draws on his firsthand knowledge of the Oval Office to explore the foreign-policy leadership of every president from Nixon to George W. Bush. This riveting and informative book about the inner workings of our government is rich with anecdotes and fly-on-the-wall portraits of presidents and their closest advisors. It is essential reading for historians, political junkies, and for anyone in charge of managing a large organization. From the Trade Paperback edition.

Churchill on Leadership

Executive Success in the Face of Adversity

Author: Steven F. Hayward

Publisher: Crown Forum

ISBN: 030777452X

Category: Business & Economics

Page: 224

View: 9765

Success often depends on the strength of a single quality: leadership. Winston Churchill is universally recognized as one of the 20th century's great political leaders and his words ring just as true in the world of commerce. A wise, witty, and inspiring leader, Churchill ran Great Britain like a great corporation. "Perhaps the finest book on practical leadership ever written." — Brian Tracy Churchill on Leadership demonstrates that the principles that guided Churchill ably translate to private industry today. Author Steven F. Hayward gives strong evidence that, if you remove Churchill from his political context, he would have the resume to be among the great business leaders of any age. Churchill: • was a financier (as chancellor of the Exechequer) and labor negotiator (as home secretary) • managed a large transportation network (as head of the British Navy) and far-flung property holdings (as colonial secretary) • persevered through bankruptcies and other financial disasters • conceived and introduced innovative new products over the opposition of his colleagues, and reorganized major production operations in the midst of crisis. With wit and insight, Hayward reveals Churchill's secrets for business success from assembling and inspiring a first-rate team to preparing a wise budget, from communicating a vision to structuring effective meetings, from acting decisively to rebounding from a failure. Laced with epochal events from the historical stage, enlivened with stimulating speculation, and leavened with wit, Churchill on Leadership is both an enjoyable read and a thought-provoking lesson on leadership. From the Trade Paperback edition.

Churchill Warrior

How a Military Life Guided Winston's Finest Hours

Author: Brian Lavery

Publisher: Casemate

ISBN: 1612005675

Category: Biography & Autobiography

Page: 448

View: 7823

On a typical day during the Second World War, Winston Churchill, as Prime Minister and Minister of Defense, issued numerous memos to the ministers and service commanders on different subjects, on both the grand strategy and the detail of the war effort. It was not just his work rate and his self-confidence which allowed him to do this. He had a unique and intimate inside knowledge of all three services which allowed him to assess their real needs – a crucial task when money, material resources, and especially manpower, were reaching their limits. No defense minister in modern times has faced such severe problems. No-one else has ever been able to balance the needs of the services in such a way – most of them came from outside with little service experience, while for those trained inside one service, it is almost impossible to gain inside knowledge at a lower level without a bias in favor of one service or another. But Churchill’s knowledge of the three services was almost perfectly balanced by his experiences since he first joined the army in 1896. He made his share of mistakes as a war leader, but this unique balance served him, his cause and his country well. Churchill Warrior looks at how Churchill gained his unique insight into war strategy and administration, and the effect this had on his thinking and leadership. Each period (before, during and after the First World War, and in the Second World War) is divided into four parts – land, sea and air warfare, and combined operations. The conclusion deals with the effect of these experiences on his wartime leadership. Written in Brian Lavery’s acclaimed, insightful and anecdotal style, a grand narrative unfolds starting with the Marlborough toy soldiers and the army class at Eton, which then leads us through those early military and journalistic experiences, the fascinating trials and lessons of the First World War, the criticism and tenacity culminating in the ultimate triumph of the key events in the Second. It explores how some of Churchill’s earliest innovations were to bear fruit decades later, how his uncompromising, but uniquely informed, hands-on approach, and his absolute belief in combined forces in Normandy, led to a systemic victory against the odds.

Lincoln on Leadership for Today

Abraham Lincoln's Approach to Twenty-First-Century Issues

Author: Donald T. Phillips

Publisher: Houghton Mifflin Harcourt

ISBN: 0544814568

Category: Business & Economics

Page: 304

View: 7391

“Don Phillips has done it again . . . bringing Lincoln’s brilliant leadership to life. Lincoln’s brilliance is as relevant today as it was a century and half ago.” — George Bodenheimer, former president, ESPN, and author of Every Town Is a Sports Town How can President Lincoln’s wisdom be applied to the most pressing conflicts of modern-day America? With a characteristically fresh and perceptive reading of Abraham Lincoln’s own writings and speeches, best-selling author Donald T. Phillips reveals how America’s sixteenth president handled many of the same national dilemmas we face today. Looking to Lincoln’s exemplary leadership of a fractured nation, Phillips offers a deeply relevant analysis of how Lincoln’s example could help forge solutions to the many issues and divisions challenging our country now. “[An] intelligent and often moving look at one of the nation’s greatest presidents . . . Using his extensive knowledge of Lincoln, Phillips makes convincing cases throughout for what the nineteenth-century statesman’s opinion would be on a wide array of issues faced by the twenty-first-century United States, including climate change, torture, immigration, and equal pay for women. For readers who find present-day politics almost too much to contemplate, Phillips’s closing vision of Lincoln witnessing the ‘current state of affairs’ will be especially poignant and bittersweet.” — Publishers Weekly

Lords of War

From Lincoln to Churchill : Supreme Command 1861-1945

Author: Correlli Barnett

Publisher: Casemate Publishers

ISBN: 1781590931

Category: History

Page: 321

View: 4248

Masterly analysis of the leadership qualities of twenty major figures between 1861 and 1945. Covers soldiers and political leaders including Lincoln, Churchill, Haig and Eisenhower. Considers fully the background against which each leader operated and the challenges they faced.

Lincoln's Sense of Humor

Author: Richard Carwardine

Publisher: SIU Press

ISBN: 0809336146

Category: Biography & Autobiography

Page: 170

View: 7980

"Abraham Lincoln was the first president consistently to make storytelling and laughter tools of office. This book shows how his uses of humor evolved to fit changing personal circumstances, and explores its versatility, range of expressions, and multiple sources"--

Six Encounters with Lincoln

A President Confronts Democracy and Its Demons

Author: Elizabeth Brown Pryor

Publisher: Penguin

ISBN: 0735222797

Category: Biography & Autobiography

Page: 496

View: 9003

“Fascinating reading. . .this book eerily reflects some of today’s key issues.” – The New York Times Book Review From an award-winning historian, an engrossing look at how Abraham Lincoln grappled with the challenges of leadership in an unruly democracy An awkward first meeting with U.S. Army officers, on the eve of the Civil War. A conversation on the White House portico with a young cavalry sergeant who was a fiercely dedicated abolitionist. A tense exchange on a navy ship with a Confederate editor and businessman. In this eye-opening book, Elizabeth Brown Pryor examines six intriguing, mostly unknown encounters that Abraham Lincoln had with his constituents. Taken together, they reveal his character and opinions in unexpected ways, illustrating his difficulties in managing a republic and creating a presidency. Pryor probes both the political demons that Lincoln battled in his ambitious exercise of power and the demons that arose from the very nature of democracy itself: the clamorous diversity of the populace, with its outspoken demands. She explores the trouble Lincoln sometimes had in communicating and in juggling the multiple concerns that make up being a political leader; how conflicted he was over the problem of emancipation; and the misperceptions Lincoln and the South held about each other. Pryor also provides a fascinating discussion of Lincoln’s fondness for storytelling and how he used his skills as a raconteur to enhance both his personal and political power. Based on scrupulous research that draws on hundreds of eyewitness letters, diaries, and newspaper excerpts, Six Encounters with Lincoln offers a fresh portrait of Lincoln as the beleaguered politician who was not especially popular with the people he needed to govern with, and who had to deal with the many critics, naysayers, and dilemmas he faced without always knowing the right answer. What it shows most clearly is that greatness was not simply laid on Lincoln’s shoulders like a mantle, but was won in fits and starts.

Churchill and Ireland

Author: Paul Bew

Publisher: Oxford University Press

ISBN: 0191071498

Category: History

Page: 208

View: 6891

Winston Churchill spent his early childhood in Ireland, had close Irish relatives, and was himself much involved in Irish political issues for a large part of his career. He took Ireland very seriously - and not only because of its significance in the Anglo-American relationship. Churchill, in fact, probably took Ireland more seriously than Ireland took Churchill. Yet, in the fifty years since Churchill's death, there has not been a single major book on his relationship to Ireland. It is the most neglected part of his legacy on both sides of the Irish Sea. Distinguished historian of Ireland Paul Bew now at long last puts this right. Churchill and Ireland tells the full story of Churchill's lifelong engagement with Ireland and the Irish, from his early years as a child in Dublin, through his central role in the Home Rule crisis of 1912-14 and in the war leading up to the Anglo-Irish Treaty of 1922, to his bitter disappointment at Irish neutrality in the Second World War and gradual rapprochement with his old enemy Eamon de Valera towards the end of his life. As this long overdue book reminds us, Churchill learnt his earliest rudimentary political lessons in Ireland. It was the first piece in the Churchill jigsaw and, in some respects, the last.

Churchill

Walking with Destiny

Author: Andrew Roberts

Publisher: Penguin

ISBN: 1101981016

Category: Biography & Autobiography

Page: 1152

View: 7679

In this landmark biography of Winston Churchill based on extensive new material, the true genius of the man, statesman and leader can finally be fully seen and understood--by the bestselling, award-winning author of Napoleon and The Storm of War When we seek an example of great leaders with unalloyed courage, the person who comes to mind is Winston Churchill: the iconic, visionary war leader immune from the consensus of the day, who stood firmly for his beliefs when everyone doubted him. But how did young Winston become Churchill? What gave him the strength to take on the superior force of Nazi Germany when bombs rained on London and so many others had caved? In Churchill, Andrew Roberts gives readers the full and definitive Winston Churchill, from birth to lasting legacy, as personally revealing as it is compulsively readable. Roberts gained exclusive access to extensive new material: transcripts of War Cabinet meetings, diaries, letters and unpublished memoirs from Churchill's contemporaries. The Royal Family permitted Roberts--in a first for a Churchill biographer--to read the detailed notes taken by King George VI in his diary after his weekly meetings with Churchill during World War II. This treasure trove of access allows Roberts to understand the man in revelatory new ways, and to identify the hidden forces fueling Churchill's legendary drive. We think of Churchill as a hero who saved civilization from the evils of Nazism and warned of the grave crimes of Soviet communism, but Roberts's masterwork reveals that he has as much to teach us about the challenges leaders face today--and the fundamental values of courage, tenacity, leadership and moral conviction.

Churchill, Hitler, and "The Unnecessary War"

How Britain Lost Its Empire and the West Lost the World

Author: Patrick J. Buchanan

Publisher: Crown Forum

ISBN: 9780307409560

Category: History

Page: 400

View: 1824

Were World Wars I and II inevitable? Were they necessary wars? Or were they products of calamitous failures of judgment? In this monumental and provocative history, Patrick Buchanan makes the case that, if not for the blunders of British statesmen–Winston Churchill first among them–the horrors of two world wars and the Holocaust might have been avoided and the British Empire might never have collapsed into ruins. Half a century of murderous oppression of scores of millions under the iron boot of Communist tyranny might never have happened, and Europe’s central role in world affairs might have been sustained for many generations. Among the British and Churchillian errors were: • The secret decision of a tiny cabal in the inner Cabinet in 1906 to take Britain straight to war against Germany, should she invade France • The vengeful Treaty of Versailles that mutilated Germany, leaving her bitter, betrayed, and receptive to the appeal of Adolf Hitler • Britain’s capitulation, at Churchill’s urging, to American pressure to sever the Anglo-Japanese alliance, insulting and isolating Japan, pushing her onto the path of militarism and conquest • The greatest mistake in British history: the unsolicited war guarantee to Poland of March 1939, ensuring the Second World War Certain to create controversy and spirited argument, Churchill, Hitler, and “the Unnecessary War” is a grand and bold insight into the historic failures of judgment that ended centuries of European rule and guaranteed a future no one who lived in that vanished world could ever have envisioned. From the Trade Paperback edition.

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