Search Results: mesoamerican-archaeology-theory-and-practice

Mesoamerican Archaeology

Theory and Practice

Author: Julia A. Hendon,Rosemary Joyce

Publisher: Wiley-Blackwell

ISBN: 9780631230526

Category: Social Science

Page: 368

View: 1454

Offering an alternative to traditional textbooks, Mesoamerican Archaeology: Theory and Practice places the reader in the middle of contemporary debates by top archaeologists actively exploring the major prehispanic societies of Central America. Offers a comprehensive introduction to the archaeology of Mesoamerica by focusing on key time periods, sites, and the issues these times and places require us to confront. Examines key moments in the Mesoamerican historical tradition, from the earliest villages where Olmec art flourished, to the Aztec and Maya City-states that Spanish invaders described in the 16th century. Engages the chronological benchmarks of precolumbian social development in Mesoamerica, such as the transition to village life, emergence of political stratification, and formation of Mesoamerican urban centers. Includes an extensive introduction by the editors that situates contemporary Mesoamerican archaeology in the broader terms of the social politics of archaeology. For further resources to use with this book - including study questions, maps and photographs - visit the website at www.blackwellpublishing.com/BSGA/mesoam

Mesoamerican Archaeology

Theory and Practice

Author: Julia A. Hendon,Rosemary Joyce

Publisher: Wiley-Blackwell

ISBN: 9780631230519

Category: Social Science

Page: 368

View: 2926

Offering an alternative to traditional textbooks, Mesoamerican Archaeology: Theory and Practice places the reader in the middle of contemporary debates by top archaeologists actively exploring the major prehispanic societies of Central America. Offers a comprehensive introduction to the archaeology of Mesoamerica by focusing on key time periods, sites, and the issues these times and places require us to confront. Examines key moments in the Mesoamerican historical tradition, from the earliest villages where Olmec art flourished, to the Aztec and Maya City-states that Spanish invaders described in the 16th century. Engages the chronological benchmarks of precolumbian social development in Mesoamerica, such as the transition to village life, emergence of political stratification, and formation of Mesoamerican urban centers. Includes an extensive introduction by the editors that situates contemporary Mesoamerican archaeology in the broader terms of the social politics of archaeology. For further resources to use with this book - including study questions, maps and photographs - visit the website at www.blackwellpublishing.com/BSGA/mesoam

Power and Identity in Archaeological Theory and Practice

Case Studies from Ancient Mesoamerica

Author: Eleanor Harrison-Buck

Publisher: University of Utah Press

ISBN: 1607812177

Category: HISTORY

Page: 192

View: 921

A new and broader approach to understanding power and identity in the Mesoamerican archaeological record

The Oxford Handbook of Mesoamerican Archaeology

Author: Deborah L. Nichols,Christopher A. Pool

Publisher: Oxford University Press

ISBN: 0195390938

Category: History

Page: 979

View: 9660

The Oxford Handbook of Mesoamerican Archaeology provides a current and comprehensive guide to the recent and on-going archaeology of Mesoamerica. Though the emphasis is on prehispanic societies, this Handbook also includes coverage of important new work by archaeologists on the Colonial and Republican periods. Unique among recent works, the text brings together in a single volume article-length regional syntheses and topical overviews written by active scholars in the field of Mesoamerican archaeology. The first section of the Handbook provides an overview of recent history and trends of Mesoamerica and articles on national archaeology programs and practice in Central America and Mexico written by archaeologists from these countries. These are followed regional syntheses organized by time period, beginning with early hunter-gatherer societies and the first farmers of Mesoamerica and concluding with a discussion of the Spanish Conquest and frontiers and peripheries of Mesoamerica. Topical and comparative articles comprise the remainder of Handbook. They cover important dimensions of prehispanic societies—from ecology, economy, and environment to social and political relations—and discuss significant methodological contributions, such as geo-chemical source studies, as well as new theories and diverse theoretical perspectives. The Handbook concludes with a section on the archaeology of the Spanish conquest and the Colonial and Republican periods to connect the prehispanic, proto-historic, and historic periods. This volume will be a must-read for students and professional archaeologists, as well as other scholars including historians, art historians, geographers, and ethnographers with an interest in Mesoamerica.

Houses in a Landscape

Memory and Everyday Life in Mesoamerica

Author: Julia A. Hendon

Publisher: Duke University Press

ISBN: 0822391724

Category: Social Science

Page: 309

View: 948

In Houses in a Landscape, Julia A. Hendon examines the connections between social identity and social memory using archaeological research on indigenous societies that existed more than one thousand years ago in what is now Honduras. While these societies left behind monumental buildings, the remains of their dead, remnants of their daily life, intricate works of art, and fine examples of craftsmanship such as pottery and stone tools, they left only a small body of written records. Despite this paucity of written information, Hendon contends that an archaeological study of memory in such societies is possible and worthwhile. It is possible because memory is not just a faculty of the individual mind operating in isolation, but a social process embedded in the materiality of human existence. Intimately bound up in the relations people develop with one another and with the world around them through what they do, where and how they do it, and with whom or what, memory leaves material traces. Hendon conducted research on three contemporaneous Native American civilizations that flourished from the seventh century through the eleventh CE: the Maya kingdom of Copan, the hilltop center of Cerro Palenque, and the dispersed settlement of the Cuyumapa valley. She analyzes domestic life in these societies, from cooking to crafting, as well as public and private ritual events including the ballgame. Combining her findings with a rich body of theory from anthropology, history, and geography, she explores how objects—the things people build, make, use, exchange, and discard—help people remember. In so doing, she demonstrates how everyday life becomes part of the social processes of remembering and forgetting, and how “memory communities” assert connections between the past and the present.

Ancient Bodies, Ancient Lives

Sex, Gender, and Archaeology

Author: Rosemary A. Joyce

Publisher: N.A

ISBN: N.A

Category: Social Science

Page: 152

View: 3305

An anthropological report on gender roles in prehistoric times draws on a wealth of recent studies that offers insight into the history of sexual identity as it developed hundreds of thousands of years ago, challenging modern stereotypes and assumptions to explain the different ways in which ancient people defined themselves.

Archaeological Theory in Practice

Author: PatriciaA Urban

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 1351576194

Category: Social Science

Page: 344

View: 6594

In this concise, friendly textbook, Patricia Urban and Edward Schortman teach the basics of archaeological theory, making explicit the crucial link between theory and the actual conduct of archaeological research. The first half of the text addresses the general nature of theory, as well as how it is used in the social sciences and in archaeology in particular. To demonstrate the usefulness of theory, the authors draw from research at Stonehenge, Mesopotamia, and their own long-term research project in the Naco Valley of Honduras. They show how theory becomes meaningful when it is used by very real individuals to interpret equally real materials. These extended narratives exemplify the creative interaction between data and theory that shape our understanding of the past. Ideal for introductory courses in archaeological theory.

Women in Archaeology

Author: Cheryl Claassen

Publisher: University of Pennsylvania Press

ISBN: 9780812215090

Category: History

Page: 252

View: 1696

"Pt. 1 of this collection presents a history of women in Americanist archaeology, including a biography of Dorothy Hughes Popenoe who conducted early stratigraphic excavations in Honduras. Pt. 2 focuses on the current status of North American women in Me

Archaeological Hammers and Theories

Author: James A. Moore,Arthur S. Keene

Publisher: Elsevier

ISBN: 1483277631

Category: History

Page: 330

View: 3781

Studies in Archaeology: Archaeological Hammers and Theories provides information pertinent to the archeological method, with emphasis on the interaction of data and technique with theory and problems. This book describes the nature of archeological data, the range of archeological theories, and the scope of archeological problems. Organized into three parts encompassing 13 chapters, this book begins with an overview of the products of the archeological record. This text then examines survey sampling, site formation studies, and lithic and ceramic analysis. Other chapters consider the behavioral concepts that are implicit in the notions of special behavior, optimization, decision making, and population dynamics. This book discusses as well the analysis of pottery, which plays a leading part in the reconstruction of culture histories in archeology. The final chapter suggests an alternative set of philosophical issues that might serve to focus a philosophy or archeology. This book is a valuable resource for archeologists.

Girls Rock!

Fifty Years of Women Making Music

Author: Mina Carson,Tisa Lewis,Susan M. Shaw

Publisher: University Press of Kentucky

ISBN: 0813150108

Category: Music

Page: 272

View: 1421

With a foreword by Jennifer Baumgardner and Amy Richards Girls Rock! explores the many ways women have defined themselves as rock musicians in an industry once dominated and controlled by men. Integrating history, feminist analysis, and developmental theory, the authors describe how and why women have become rock musicians -- what inspires them to play and perform, how they write, what their music means to them, and what they hope their music means to listeners. As these musicians tell their stories, topics emerge that illuminate broader trends in rock's history. From Wanda Jackson's revolutionary act of picking up a guitar to the current success of independent artists such as Ani DiFranco, Girls Rock! examines the shared threads of these performers' lives and the evolution of women's roles in rock music since its beginnings in the 1950s. This provocative investigation of women in rock is based on numerous interviews with a broad spectrum of women performers -- those who have achieved fame and those just starting bands, those playing at local coffeehouses and those selling out huge arenas. Girls Rock! celebrates what female musicians have to teach about their experiences as women, artists, and rock musicians.

Ancient Civilizations

The Near East and Mesoamerica

Author: C. C. Lamberg-Karlovsky,Jeremy A. Sabloff

Publisher: Waveland PressInc

ISBN: N.A

Category: History

Page: 406

View: 6441

A thorough exploration of the nature and processes that led to civilization can be successfully accomplished by examining well-known archaeological areas in depth and within a comparative framework. This newly revised edition of Ancient Civilizations embraces this useful approach and remains the only in-depth overview that provides detailed discussions of both New World and Old World civilizations within the same book. The material is well presented in a lively yet authoritative manner by two highly regarded anthropologists. All educators and students concerned with the factual and theoretical issues surrounding ancient civilizations in the Near East, South and Central Asia, and Mesoamerica will find this to be an indispensable volume. A considerably expanded concluding chapter provides insights into some of the current debates about the development of ancient civilizations.

Mesoamerican Plazas

Arenas of Community and Power

Author: Kenichiro Tsukamoto,Takeshi Inomata

Publisher: University of Arizona Press

ISBN: 0816598797

Category: Social Science

Page: 280

View: 5465

Until now, archaeological and historical studies of Mesoamerican plazas have been scarce compared to studies of the surrounding monumental architecture such as pyramidal temples and palaces. Many scholars have assumed that ancient Mesoamericans invested their labor, wealth, and symbolic value in pyramids and other prominent buildings, viewing plazas as by-products of these buildings. Even when researchers have recognized the potential significance of plazas, they have thought that plazas as vacant spaces could offer few clues about their cultural and political roles. Mesoamerican Plazas challenges both of these assumptions. The primary question that has motivated the contributors is how Mesoamerican plazas became arenas for the creation and negotiation of social relations and values in a community. The thirteen contributions stress the significance of interplay between power relations and embodied practices set in specific historical and material settings, as outlined by practice theory and performance theory. This approach allows the contributors to explore broader anthropological issues, such as the negotiation of power relations, community making, and the constitution of political authorities. Overall, the contributions establish that physical interactions among people in communal events were not the outcomes of political machinations held behind the scenes, but were the actual political processes through which people created, negotiated, and subverted social realities. If so, spacious plazas that were arguably designed for interactions among a large number of individuals must have also provided critical arenas for the constitution and transformation of society.

Commoner Ritual and Ideology in Ancient Mesoamerica

Author: Nancy Gonlin,Jon C. Lohse

Publisher: N.A

ISBN: N.A

Category: Social Science

Page: 304

View: 7274

Were most commoners in ancient Mesoamerica poor? In a material sense, yes, probably so. Were they poor in their beliefs and culture? Certainly not, as Commoner Ritual and Ideology in Ancient Mesoamerica demonstrates. This volume explores the ritual life of Mesoamerica's common citizens, inside and outside of the domestic sphere, from Formative through Postclassic periods. Building from the premise that ritual and ideological expression inhered at all levels of society in Mesoamerica, the contributors demonstrate that ideology did not emanate solely from exalted individuals and that commoner ritual expression was not limited to household contexts. Taking an empirical approach to this under-studied and under-theorized area, contributors use material evidence to discover how commoner status conditioned the expression of ideas and values. Revealing complex social hierarchies that varied across time and region, this volume offers theoretical approaches to commoner ideology, religious practice, and sociopolitical organization and builds a framework for future study of the correlation of ritual and ideological expression with social position for Mesoamericanists and archaeologists worldwide.

Handbook of South American Archaeology

Author: Helaine Silverman,William Isbell

Publisher: Springer Science & Business Media

ISBN: 9780387752280

Category: Social Science

Page: 1192

View: 2661

Perhaps the contributions of South American archaeology to the larger field of world archaeology have been inadequately recognized. If so, this is probably because there have been relatively few archaeologists working in South America outside of Peru and recent advances in knowledge in other parts of the continent are only beginning to enter larger archaeological discourse. Many ideas of and about South American archaeology held by scholars from outside the area are going to change irrevocably with the appearance of the present volume. Not only does the Handbook of South American Archaeology (HSAA) provide immense and broad information about ancient South America, the volume also showcases the contributions made by South Americans to social theory. Moreover, one of the merits of this volume is that about half the authors (30) are South Americans, and the bibliographies in their chapters will be especially useful guides to Spanish and Portuguese literature as well as to the latest research. It is inevitable that the HSAA will be compared with the multi-volume Handbook of South American Indians (HSAI), with its detailed descriptions of indigenous peoples of South America, that was organized and edited by Julian Steward. Although there are heroic archaeological essays in the HSAI, by the likes of Junius Bird, Gordon Willey, John Rowe, and John Murra, Steward states frankly in his introduction to Volume Two that “arch- ology is included by way of background” to the ethnographic chapters.

The First Maya Civilization

Ritual and Power Before the Classic Period

Author: Francisco Estrada-Belli

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 1136882499

Category: Social Science

Page: 192

View: 391

When the Maya kings of Tikal dedicated their first carved monuments in the third century A.D., inaugurating the Classic period of Maya history that lasted for six centuries and saw the rise of such famous cities as Palenque, Copan and Yaxchilan, Maya civilization was already nearly a millennium old. Its first cities, such as Nakbe and El Mirador, had some of the largest temples ever raised in Prehispanic America, while others such as Cival showed even earlier evidence of complex rituals. The reality of this Preclassic Maya civilization has been documented by scholars over the past three decades: what had been seen as an age of simple village farming, belatedly responding to the stimulus of more advanced peoples in highland Mesoamerica, is now know to have been the period when the Maya made themselves into one of the New World's most innovative societies. This book discusses the most recent advances in our knowledge of the Preclassic Maya and the emergence of their rainforest civilization, with new data on settlement, political organization, architecture, iconography and epigraphy supporting a contemporary theoretical perspective that challenges prior assumptions.

Stone Houses and Earth Lords

Maya Religion in the Cave Context

Author: Keith Malcolm Prufer,James Edward Brady

Publisher: N.A

ISBN: N.A

Category: Architecture

Page: 392

View: 1097

This heavily illustrated compilation of current scholarship on cave archaeology in the Maya lowlands is the first dedicated to the subject and yields key insights into Maya ritual and cosmology. An important publication that fills a crucial niche in Maya scholarship and addresses issues important to archaeology, cave studies, religion, anthropology, global archaeology, and more.

Archaeology

Theories, Methods, and Practice

Author: Colin Renfrew,Paul G. Bahn

Publisher: N.A

ISBN: 9780500292105

Category: Social Science

Page: 672

View: 5723

The best-selling archaeology textbook in the world, revised and updated, and now in its seventh edition

Mesoamerican Figurines

Small-scale Indices of Large-scale Social Phenomena

Author: Christina T. Halperin

Publisher: N.A

ISBN: N.A

Category: History

Page: 440

View: 7528

This book examines figurines from the Olmec to the Aztec civilizations. This book also analyzes these objects by their stylistic attributes, archaeological content, function.

Reflections Of Our Past

How Human History Is Revealed In Our Genes

Author: John H Relethford

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 0429977360

Category: Social Science

Page: 272

View: 3060

Where did modern humans come from and how important are the biological differences among us? Are we descended from Neanderthals? How many races of people are there? Were Native Americans the first settlers of the New World? How can we tell if Thomas Jefferson had a child with Sally Hemings? Through an engaging examination of issues such as these, and using non-technical language, Reflections of Our Past shows how anthropologists use genetic information to test theories and define possible answers to fundamental questions in human history. By looking at genetic variation in the world today, we can reconstruct the recent and remote events and processes that created the variation we see, providing a fascinating reflection of our genetic past. Reflections of Our Pastis a W. W. Howells Book Prize Winner and Choice Outstanding Academic Title.

Quest for the Past

Great Discoveries in Archaeology

Author: Brian M. Fagan

Publisher: Waveland PressInc

ISBN: N.A

Category: Social Science

Page: 281

View: 7703

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