Mohammed S Koran PDF EPUB Download

Mohammed S Koran also available in docx and mobi. Read Mohammed S Koran online, read in mobile or Kindle.

The Koran: Commonly Called the Alcoran of Mohammed

Translated Into English Immediately from the Original Arabic, with Explanatory Notes ... To which is Prefixed a Preliminary Discourse by George Sale...

Author:

Publisher:

ISBN:

Category:

Page: 648

View: 973

Inner and Outer Meanings of Koran (Quran)

Author: M.Singh Parashar

Publisher: AuthorHouse

ISBN:

Category: Religion

Page: 402

View: 922

In this translation of Koran all the verses have been rearranged subject wise . The Koran has been divided into two parts( a) The divine and infallible Koran (b) The human and fallible Koran (due to absence of the hidden meanings ). Suggestions :-Follow the following rule :- an eye for an eye, an eye for a nose, an eye for an ear , an eye for a teeth . Collect the eyes and give these to the eye bank . Do not cut of the hand of the thief . Take out an eye of the thief and give to the blind man . By this system an error of justice can be rectified by returning the eye back to the man who has been wrongly declared as a thief . Do not stone the adulterer to death . Take out an eye, kidney and other organs out of the body of the adulterer or rapist and collect the money by selling these organs and give this money to the victim of rape etc .A constructive punishment is better than a destructive punishment

Canonical Texts. Bearers of Absolute Authority. Bible, Koran, Veda, Tipitaka

A Phenomenological Study

Author: Rein Fernhout

Publisher: Rodopi

ISBN:

Category: Religion

Page: 337

View: 345

This book introduces a new approach to the comparative study of sacred texts - here the Christian Bible, the Islamic Koran, the Hindu Veda and the Buddhist Tipiaka. The author demonstrates that, in spite of their great differences, these works show a fundamentalanalogy.Considered as canonical within their own religious context, each text possessesabsolute authority in comparison with other authoritative texts from their respective religious traditions. This fundamental analogy allows one to describe the growth and history of these canons, step by step, as a process that takes place in analogous phases that are clearly distinguishable. The author follows a strictly phenomenological method: he tries to understand the development of these canons in terms of a potential that lies within the phenomena themselves, i.e. the texts, while refraining in any way from assessing their claim to absolute authority.In part I the author describes the development from the 'revelation' of the texts to aclimax with respect to reflection on the canons. This climax has been reached in all four cases. Part II investigates thecrisis that these canons are currently undergoing as a consequence of the modern intellectual climate. Can we expect that this crisis will be overcome by the canons? And if so, will they be in a position of mutual exclusion or will they form a sort of unity such as, for example, the Old and New Testament in the Christian Bible? Finally the author traces what the religions themselves have postulated about thefuture of their respective canons. The result is surprising: the current crisis is only faint reflection of what, according to age-old predictions, awaits the canons in the future.

Sexual Mutilations

A Human Tragedy

Author: George C. Denniston

Publisher: Springer Science & Business Media

ISBN:

Category: Psychology

Page: 237

View: 837

Sexual mutilation is a global problem that affects 15. 3 million children and young adults annually. In terms of gender, 13. 3 million boys and 2 million girls are involuntarily subjected to sexual mutilation every year. While it is tempting to quantify and compare the amount of tissue removed from either gender, no ethical justification can be made for removing any amount of flesh from the body of another person. The violation of human rights implicit in sexual mutilation is identical for any gender. The violation occurs with the first cut into another person 's body. Although mutilation is a strong term, it precisely and accurately describes a condi tion denoting "any disfigurement or injury by removal or destruction of any conspicuous or essential part of the body. " While such terms as "circumcision" and "genital cutting" are less threatening to our sensitivities, they ultimately do a disservice by masking the fact of what is actually being done to babies and children. Although the courageous example of the survivors of sexual mutilation indicates that humans can certainly live and even re produce without all of their external sexualorgans, this biological phenomenon does not, however, justify subjecting a person to sexual mutilation. The remarkable resilience of the human body is a testament to the importance nature places on reproduction rather than a vindication for surgical practices that compromise this function.

The Koran, Commonly Called The Alcoran of Mohammed, Transl. from the Original Arabic; with Explanatory Notes, Taken from the Most Approved Commentators. To which is Prefixed, A Preliminary Discourse. By George Sale. A New Ed

Author: 'Abu-l-Qasim Muhammad ibn 'Abdallah al-Nabi

Publisher:

ISBN:

Category:

Page:

View: 518

The Koran; commonly called the Alcoran of Mohammed: tr. with notes, to which is prefixed a prelim. discourse by G. Sale

Author:

Publisher:

ISBN:

Category:

Page:

View: 653

The Koran, Commonly Called the Alcoran of Mohammed Translated Into English ...

With Explanatory Notes ... To which is Prefixed a Preliminary Discourse

Author:

Publisher:

ISBN:

Category:

Page:

View: 386

Married to Islam

Author: M. F. Sawyer

Publisher: iUniverse

ISBN:

Category: Biography & Autobiography

Page: 240

View: 877

Dalia Shah was a European who converted to Islam. Then she met and married an Arab-European Moslem. At first things went well, but things changed. Religious differences, cultural problems, and her husband's depression all hurt her marriage and their children. This book tells of her early life and her dissatisfaction with Christianity in her home country. We share her travels abroad as a young woman, including a trip to Israel where she learned about Judaism. We also learn of her early studies of Buddhism. It was the Islam of the Koran that caught her, though. Except the Islam she thought she had joined is not that of the Koran. Instead it is something skewed by people for very selfish ends. It is especially hurtful for women. Dalia reveals the secrets of the Marriage Contract, which properly done gives the spouse ensured child, property, and divorce rights, along with freedom of travel. The events of 9/11 absolutely effected her marriage. Her perspectives as a Christian-born European Islamic woman to the "War on Terror" and the terrorists themselves are another very interesting part of Married To Islam. "Surprises abound here. This is a book from which Christians, Moslems, and Jews can all gain a new understanding. Any persons thinking of marrying an Islamic person should absolutely read this-the Marriage Contract information alone makes it utterly worthwhile. It was wonderful to work with Dalia. To keep such a positive spirit after all she has endured-sometimes I think she has the patience of a saint." -M. F. Sawyer, Coauthor "Reading this book, I got to where I couldn't wait to find out what was going to happen next." -Rebecca McDonald

Readings in Orientalism

Author: Bryan S. Turner

Publisher: Taylor & Francis

ISBN:

Category: History

Page: 592

View: 305

First published in 1999. Routledge is an imprint of Taylor & Francis, an informa company.

Fastinig in the Koran

Author:

Publisher: Brill Archive

ISBN:

Category:

Page:

View: 240

Best Books