Search Results: multimethod-research-causal-mechanisms-and-case-studies

Multimethod Research, Causal Mechanisms, and Case Studies

An Integrated Approach

Author: Gary Goertz

Publisher: Princeton University Press

ISBN: 1400888115

Category: Social Science

Page: 312

View: 7284

An innovative and accessible textbook on multimethod and case-study research Multimethod research has become indispensable to doing social science, and is essential to anyone who conducts large-scale research projects in political science, sociology, education, comparative law, or business. This authoritative and accessible book offers the first truly comprehensive approach to multimethod and case-study research, and is particularly aimed at students of qualitative methods in the social sciences. Walking step-by-step through these cutting-edge tools and techniques, Gary Goertz introduces a new integrated approach that unites three corners of a powerful research triad—causal mechanisms, cross-case causal inference, and within-case causal inference. He explains how the investigation of causal mechanisms and the making of within-case causal inference are the central goals of multimethod and case study research, and provides a logic for connecting case studies and causal mechanism analysis with cross-case analysis, whether they are statistical analyses, experiments, or QCA. In addition, Goertz analyzes how one can generalize using case studies, as well as systematically test game-theoretic and other models using multiple case studies. Provides a fully integrated approach to multimethod and case-study research An essential resource for students and researchers in political science, sociology, education, law, and business Covers constraint causal mechanism, game theory and case studies, QCA, and the use of case studies to systematically test and generalize theories An ideal textbook for a first-year graduate course in methods or research design

A Tale of Two Cultures

Qualitative and Quantitative Research in the Social Sciences

Author: Gary Goertz,James Mahoney

Publisher: Princeton University Press

ISBN: 0691149712

Category: Political Science

Page: 238

View: 4063

Some in the social sciences argue that the same logic applies to both qualitative and quantitative methods. In A Tale of Two Cultures, Gary Goertz and James Mahoney demonstrate that these two paradigms constitute different cultures, each internally coherent yet marked by contrasting norms, practices, and toolkits. They identify and discuss major differences between these two traditions that touch nearly every aspect of social science research, including design, goals, causal effects and models, concepts and measurement, data analysis, and case selection. Although focused on the differences between qualitative and quantitative research, Goertz and Mahoney also seek to promote toleration, exchange, and learning by enabling scholars to think beyond their own culture and see an alternative scientific worldview. This book is written in an easily accessible style and features a host of real-world examples to illustrate methodological points.

Multi-Method Social Science

Combining Qualitative and Quantitative Tools

Author: Jason Seawright

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

ISBN: 1107097711

Category: Political Science

Page: 242

View: 6231

This book provides the first systematic guide to designing multi-method research, considering a wide range of statistical and qualitative tools.

Finding Pathways

Mixed-Method Research for Studying Causal Mechanisms

Author: Nicholas Weller,Jeb Barnes

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

ISBN: 1107041066

Category: Political Science

Page: 171

View: 5437

Introduces 'pathway analysis': a method to combine large and small-N research techniques and to aid understanding of causal mechanisms.

Causal Case Study Methods

Foundations and Guidelines for Comparing, Matching, and Tracing

Author: Derek Beach,Rasmus Brun Pedersen

Publisher: University of Michigan Press

ISBN: 0472053221

Category: Social Science

Page: 398

View: 2018

An introduction to causal case study methods, complete with step-by-step guidelines and examples

Set-Theoretic Methods for the Social Sciences

A Guide to Qualitative Comparative Analysis

Author: Carsten Q. Schneider,Claudius Wagemann

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

ISBN: 1139560611

Category: Political Science

Page: N.A

View: 4429

Qualitative Comparative Analysis (QCA) and other set-theoretic methods distinguish themselves from other approaches to the study of social phenomena by using sets and the search for set relations. In virtually all social science fields, statements about social phenomena can be framed in terms of set relations, and using set-theoretic methods to investigate these statements is therefore highly valuable. This book guides readers through the basic principles of set theory and then on to the applied practices of QCA. It provides a thorough understanding of basic and advanced issues in set-theoretic methods together with tricks of the trade, software handling and exercises. Most arguments are introduced using examples from existing research. The use of QCA is increasing rapidly and the application of set-theory is both fruitful and still widely misunderstood in current empirical comparative social research. This book provides the comprehensive guide to these methods for researchers across the social sciences.

Process Tracing

Author: Andrew Bennett,Jeffrey T. Checkel

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

ISBN: 1107044529

Category: Political Science

Page: 344

View: 5262

This book provides empirically grounded conceptual, design and practical advice on conducting process tracing, a key method of qualitative research.

The Oxford Handbook of Political Methodology

Author: Janet M. Box-Steffensmeier,Henry E. Brady,David Collier

Publisher: Oxford University Press on Demand

ISBN: 9780199286546

Category: Political Science

Page: 880

View: 8626

The Oxford Handbooks of Political Science are the essential guide to the state of political science today. With engaging contributions from major international scholars The Oxford Handbook of Political Methodology provides the key point of reference for anyone working throughout the discipline.

Social Science Concepts

A User's Guide

Author: Gary Goertz

Publisher: Princeton University Press

ISBN: 1400842999

Category: Social Science

Page: 320

View: 1958

Concepts lie at the core of social science theory and methodology. They provide substance to theories; they form the basis of measurement; they influence the selection of cases. Social Science Concepts: A Users Guide explores alternative means of concept construction and their impact on the role of concepts in measurement, case selection, and theories. While there exists a plethora of books on measurement, scaling, and the like, there are virtually no books devoted to the construction and analysis of concepts and their role in the research enterprise. Social Science Concepts: A Users Guide provides detailed and practical advice on the construction and use of social science concepts; a Web site provides classroom exercises. It uses a wide range of examples from political science and sociology such as revolution, welfare state, international disputes and war, and democracy to illustrate the theoretical and practical issues of concept construction and use. It explores the means of constructing complex, multilevel, and multidimensional concepts. In particular, it examines the classic necessary and sufficient condition approach to concept building and contrasts it with the family resemblance approach. The consequences of valid concept construction are explored in both qualitative and quantitative analyses. Social Science Concepts: A Users Guide will prove an indispensable guide for graduate students and scholars in the social sciences. More broadly, it will appeal to scholars in any field who wish to think more carefully about the concepts used to create theories and research designs. For Course Use: Social Science Concepts: A Users Guide has been written with classroom use in mind. Many of the chapters have been successfully taught at the Annual Training Institute on Qualitative Research Methods which is sponsored by the Consortium on Qualitative Research Methods. Feedback from those experiences has been incorporated into the text. Each chapter provides useful, practical, and detailed advice on how to construct, evaluate, and use concepts. To make the volume more useful, an extensive set of classroom exercises is available from the author's Web page at http://www.u.arizona.edu/~ggoertz/social_science_concepts.html. These include questions about prominent published work on concepts, measures, and case selection; in addition there are logic exercises and questions regarding large-N applications.

Case Studies and Theory Development in the Social Sciences

Author: Alexander L. George,Andrew Bennett,Sean M. Lynn-Jones,Steven E. Miller

Publisher: MIT Press

ISBN: 9780262572224

Category: Political Science

Page: 331

View: 9350

A text that emphasizes the importance of case studies in social science scholarship and shows how to make case study practices more rigorous.

The Puzzle of Peace

The Evolution of Peace in the International System

Author: Gary Goertz,Alexandru Balas

Publisher: Oxford University Press

ISBN: 0199301026

Category: Boundary disputes

Page: 260

View: 8686

The Puzzle of Peace moves beyond defining peace as the absence of war and develops a broader conceptualization and explanation for the increasing peacefulness of the international system. The authors track the rise of peace as a new phenomenon in international history starting after 1945. International peace has increased because international society has developed a set of norms dealing with territorial conflict, by far the greatest source of international war over previous centuries. These norms prohibit the use of military force in resolving territorial disputes and acquiring territory, thereby promoting border stability. This includes the prohibition of the acquisition of territory by military means as well as attempts by secessionist groups to form states through military force. International norms for managing international conflict have been accompanied by increased mediation and adjudication as means of managing existing territorial conflicts.

Dictators and Democrats

Masses, Elites, and Regime Change

Author: Stephan Haggard,Robert R. Kaufman

Publisher: Princeton University Press

ISBN: 1400882982

Category: Political Science

Page: 424

View: 7819

From the 1980s through the first decade of the twenty-first century, the spread of democracy across the developing and post-Communist worlds transformed the global political landscape. What drove these changes and what determined whether the emerging democracies would stabilize or revert to authoritarian rule? Dictators and Democrats takes a comprehensive look at the transitions to and from democracy in recent decades. Deploying both statistical and qualitative analysis, Stephen Haggard and Robert Kaufman engage with theories of democratic change and advocate approaches that emphasize political and institutional factors. While inequality has been a prominent explanation for democratic transitions, the authors argue that its role has been limited, and elites as well as masses can drive regime change. Examining seventy-eight cases of democratic transition and twenty-five reversions since 1980, Haggard and Kaufman show how differences in authoritarian regimes and organizational capabilities shape popular protest and elite initiatives in transitions to democracy, and how institutional weaknesses cause some democracies to fail. The determinants of democracy lie in the strength of existing institutions and the public's capacity to engage in collective action. There are multiple routes to democracy, but those growing out of mass mobilization may provide more checks on incumbents than those emerging from intra-elite bargains. Moving beyond well-known beliefs regarding regime changes, Dictators and Democrats explores the conditions under which transitions to democracy are likely to arise.

Case Study Research

Principles and Practices

Author: John Gerring

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

ISBN: 1316857808

Category: Reference

Page: N.A

View: 6594

Case Study Research: Principles and Practices provides a general understanding of the case study method as well as specific tools for its successful implementation. These tools are applicable in a variety of fields including anthropology, business and management, communications, economics, education, medicine, political science, psychology, social work, and sociology. Topics include: a survey of case study approaches; a methodologically tractable definition of 'case study'; strategies for case selection, including random sampling and other algorithmic approaches; quantitative and qualitative modes of case study analysis; and problems of internal and external validity. The second edition of this core textbook is designed to be accessible to readers who are new to the subject and is thoroughly revised and updated, incorporating recent research, numerous up-to-date studies and comprehensive lecture slides.

Encyclopedia of Case Study Research

L - Z; Index

Author: Albert J. Mills,Gabrielle Durepos,Elden Wiebe

Publisher: SAGE

ISBN: 1412956706

Category:

Page: 517

View: 6686

Rethinking Social Inquiry

Diverse Tools, Shared Standards

Author: Henry E. Brady,David Collier

Publisher: Rowman & Littlefield Publishers

ISBN: 1442203455

Category: Political Science

Page: 428

View: 9075

With innovative new chapters on process tracing, regression analysis, and natural experiments, the second edition of Rethinking Social Inquiry further extends the reach of this path-breaking book. The original debate with King, Keohane, and Verba_now updated_remains central to the volume, and the new material illuminates evolving discussions of essential methodological tools. Thus, process tracing is often invoked as fundamental to qualitative analysis, but is rarely applied with precision. Pitfalls of regression analysis are sometimes noted, but often are inadequately examined. And the complex assumptions and trade-offs of natural experiments are poorly understood. The second edition extends the methodological horizon through exploring these critical tools. A distinctive feature of this edition is the online placement of four chapters from the prior edition, all focused on the dialogue with King, Keohane, and Verba. Also posted online are exercises for teaching process tracing and understanding process tracing.

The Oxford Handbook of Philosophy of Social Science

Author: Harold Kincaid

Publisher: Oxford University Press

ISBN: 0195392752

Category: Business & Economics

Page: 657

View: 2849

The philosophy of the social sciences considers the underlying explanatory powers of the social (or human) sciences, such as history, economics, anthropology, politics, and sociology. The type of questions covered includes the methodological (the nature of observations, laws, theories, and explanations) to the ontological — whether or not these sciences can explain human nature in a way consistent with common-sense beliefs. This Handbook is a major, comprehensive look at the key ideas in the field, is guided by several principles. The first is that the philosophy of social science should be closely connected to, and informed by, developments in the sciences themselves. The second is that the volume should appeal to practicing social scientists as well as philosophers, with the contributors being both drawn from both ranks, and speaking to ongoing controversial issues in the field. Finally, the volume promotes connections across the social sciences, with greater internal discussion and interaction across disciplinary boundaries.

International Norms and Decision Making

A Punctuated Equilibrium Model

Author: Gary Goertz

Publisher: Rowman & Littlefield

ISBN: 9780742525900

Category: Political Science

Page: 262

View: 3404

This book presents a punctuated equilibrium framework for understanding the nature of policy decision-making by governments as well as a theory of the creation, functioning and evolution of international norms and institutions.

Process-Tracing Methods

Foundations and Guidelines

Author: Derek Beach,Rasmus Brun Pedersen

Publisher: University of Michigan Press

ISBN: 047205189X

Category: Social Science

Page: 199

View: 5244

The first practical guide for using process tracing in social science research

Explaining War and Peace

Case Studies and Necessary Condition Counterfactuals

Author: Jack Levy,Gary Goertz

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 1134101406

Category: History

Page: 362

View: 1203

This edited volume focuses on the use of ‘necessary condition counterfactuals’ in explaining two key events in twentieth century history, the origins of the First World War and the end of the Cold War. Containing essays by leading figures in the field, this book analyzes the causal logics of necessary and sufficient conditions, demonstrates the variety of different ways in which necessary condition counterfactuals are used to explain the causes of individual events, and identifies errors commonly made in applying this form of causal logic to individual events. It includes discussions of causal chains, contingency, critical junctures, and ‘powder keg’ explanations, and the role of necessary conditions in each. Explaining War and Peace will be of great interest to students of qualitative analysis, the First World War, the Cold War, international history and international relations theory in general.

Logics of War

Explanations for Limited and Unlimited Conflicts

Author: Alex Weisiger

Publisher: Cornell University Press

ISBN: 0801468167

Category: Political Science

Page: 320

View: 2573

Most wars between countries end quickly and at relatively low cost. The few in which high-intensity fighting continues for years bring about a disproportionate amount of death and suffering. What separates these few unusually long and intense wars from the many conflicts that are far less destructive? In Logics of War, Alex Weisiger tests three explanations for a nation's decision to go to war and continue fighting regardless of the costs. He combines sharp statistical analysis of interstate wars over the past two centuries with nine narrative case studies. He examines both well-known conflicts like World War II and the Persian Gulf War, as well as unfamiliar ones such as the 1864-1870 Paraguayan War (or the War of the Triple Alliance), which proportionally caused more deaths than any other war in modern history. When leaders go to war expecting easy victory, events usually correct their misperceptions quickly and with fairly low casualties, thereby setting the stage for a negotiated agreement. A second explanation involves motives born of domestic politics; as war becomes more intense, however, leaders are increasingly constrained in their ability to continue the fighting. Particularly destructive wars instead arise from mistrust of an opponent's intentions. Countries that launch preventive wars to forestall expected decline tend to have particularly ambitious war aims that they hold to even when fighting goes poorly. Moreover, in some cases, their opponents interpret the preventive attack as evidence of a dispositional commitment to aggression, resulting in the rejection of any form of negotiation and a demand for unconditional surrender. Weisiger's treatment of a topic of central concern to scholars of major wars will also be read with great interest by military historians, political psychologists, and sociologists.

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