Search Results: politics-religion-and-the-press-irish-journalism-in-mid-victorian-england

Politics, Religion and the Press

Irish Journalism in Mid-Victorian England

Author: Anthony McNicholas

Publisher: Peter Lang

ISBN: 9783039106998

Category: Language Arts & Disciplines

Page: 370

View: 5074

The decade of the 1860s was a turbulent period in Irish politics, both at home and abroad, and saw the rise and apparent failure of the separatist Fenian movement. In England, this period also witnessed the first realistic attempt at establishing a genuinely popular press amid Irish migrants to Britain. This was to be an ideological battle as both secular nationalists and the Roman Catholic Church, for their very distinct reasons, desperately wished to communicate with a reading public which owed its existence in large measure to the massive immigration of the years of the Famine. Based on extensive archival research, this book provides the first serious study of the Irish press in Britain for any period, through a detailed analysis of three London newspapers, "The Universal News" (1860-9), "The Irish Liberator" (1863-4) and "The Irish News" (1867). In so doing, it provides us with a window onto the complex of relationships which shaped the lives of the migrants: with each other, with their English fellow Catholics, with the Catholic Church and with the state. A central question for this press was how to reconcile the twin demands of faith and fatherland.

Dictionary of Nineteenth-century Journalism in Great Britain and Ireland

Author: Laurel Brake,Marysa Demoor

Publisher: Academia Press

ISBN: 9038213409

Category: History

Page: 1014

View: 3565

A large-scale reference work covering the journalism industry in 19th-Century Britain.

Irish Journalism Before Independence

More a disease than a profession

Author: Kevin Rafter

Publisher: Oxford University Press

ISBN: 0719094941

Category: History

Page: 257

View: 9063

They reported wars, outraged monarchs and promoted the case for their country's freedom. The pages of Irish Journalism Before Independence: More a Disease than a Profession are filled with the remarkable stories of reporters, proprietors and propagandists. Sixteen leading writers celebrate the emergence of Irish Journalism in this original and engaging volume. These leading media academics, historians and scholars join in what is a festschrift travelling the long Irish nineteenth century to 1922. Their stories, narratives and histories illustrate the emergence of Irish journalism chronicling the evolution and development of the profession, and the various challenges confronted by the first generation of modern journalists. The profession's past is framed by reference to its practitioners and their practice. Readers are treated to studies of foreign correspondents, editorial writers, provincial newspaper owners, sports journalists and the challenges of minority language journalism. The volume goes beyond Ireland to explore the work of Irish journalists abroad and shows how the great political debates about Ireland's place in the United Kingdom served as a backdrop to newspaper publication in the nineteenth and early twentieth centuries. In his preface Professor James Curran concludes that the volume "advances by leaps and bounds the history of the Irish press". The collection makes valuable and important contribution to our knowledge of Irish journalism - and like all good reportage it offers its readers a very good read.

The Routledge Handbook to Nineteenth-Century British Periodicals and Newspapers

Author: Andrew King,Alexis Easley,John Morton

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 1317042301

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 476

View: 9978

Providing a comprehensive, interdisciplinary examination of scholarship on nineteenth-century British periodicals, this volume surveys the current state of research and offers researchers an in-depth examination of contemporary methodologies. The impact of digital media and archives on the field informs all discussions of the print archive. Contributors illustrate their arguments with examples and contextualize their topics within broader areas of study, while also reflecting on how the study of periodicals may evolve in the future. The Handbook will serve as a valuable resource for scholars and students of nineteenth-century culture who are interested in issues of cultural formation, transformation, and transmission in a developing industrial and globalizing age, as well as those whose research focuses on the bibliographical and the micro case study. In addition to rendering a comprehensive review and critique of current research on nineteenth-century British periodicals, the Handbook suggests new avenues for research in the twenty-first century.

The Global Dimensions of Irish Identity

Race, Nation, and the Popular Press, 1840-1880

Author: Cian T. McMahon

Publisher: UNC Press Books

ISBN: 1469620111

Category: History

Page: 254

View: 6295

Though Ireland is a relatively small island on the northeastern fringe of the Atlantic, 70 million people worldwide--including some 45 million in the United States--claim it as their ancestral home. In this wide-ranging, ambitious book, Cian T. McMahon explores the nineteenth-century roots of this transnational identity. Between 1840 and 1880, 4.5 million people left Ireland to start new lives abroad. Using primary sources from Ireland, Australia, and the United States, McMahon demonstrates how this exodus shaped a distinctive sense of nationalism. By doggedly remaining loyal to both their old and new homes, he argues, the Irish helped broaden the modern parameters of citizenship and identity. From insurrection in Ireland to exile in Australia to military service during the American Civil War, McMahon's narrative revolves around a group of rebels known as Young Ireland. They and their fellow Irish used weekly newspapers to construct and express an international identity tailored to the fluctuating world in which they found themselves. Understanding their experience sheds light on our contemporary debates over immigration, race, and globalization.

Irish University Review

Author: N.A

Publisher: N.A

ISBN: N.A

Category: English literature

Page: N.A

View: 5052

Victorian Periodicals Review

Author: N.A

Publisher: N.A

ISBN: N.A

Category: English periodicals

Page: N.A

View: 738

Newspapers and Newsmakers

The Dublin Nationalist Press in the Mid-Nineteenth Century

Author: Ann Andrews

Publisher: Oxford University Press

ISBN: 1781387451

Category: History

Page: N.A

View: 6385

Focusing on the years 1842 to 1867, Newspapers and Newsmakers evaluates the impact of the Dublin nationalist press on the Irish nationalist cause in its aspirations to overthrow the 1800 Act of Union and establish an independent Irish nation. The Dublin nationalist journalists were totally immersed in Irish nationalist activities, whether by reporting news or creating it, often risking danger to themselves from the British government. Beginning with The Nation, a newspaper that heralded a new era of Irish political and cultural nationalism, this book charts the Dublin nationalist press's emphatic role in the promotion of Daniel O'Connell's Repeal of the Union campaign with its impressive peaceful mass mobilizations, the bitter and turbulent splits between leading Irish nationalists in 1846 and 1848, and the attempted Young Ireland rebellion. Following the temporary downfall of the nationalist movement, and in response to the Great Famine, the Dublin nationalist journalists sought an ideological reconstruction of the Irish nationalist cause that included a long-term commitment to revolutionary nationalism leading to the rise of the Irish Republican Brotherhood. Drawing upon critical analyses of the political and literary contents of the Dublin nationalist newspapers, emphasis is placed upon the power of ideas, particularly the impassioned dynamics between constitutional nationalism and revolutionary nationalism. This book also focuses on the thinking of high-profile nationalist writers such as Thomas Davis and John Mitchel and the inspiration they gave to their contemporaries and future Irish nationalists alike. Newspapers and Newsmakers establishes that what was written in the Dublin nationalist press during the mid-nineteenth century had a powerful and enduring influence on the development of Irish nationalism.

The Irish Times

150 Years of Influence

Author: Terence Brown

Publisher: Bloomsbury Publishing

ISBN: 1472919076

Category: History

Page: 448

View: 9344

The Irish Times is a pillar of Irish society. Founded in 1859 as the paper of the Irish Protestant Middle Class, it now has a position in Irish political, social and cultural life which is incomparable. In fact this history of the Irish Times is also a history of the Irish people. Always independent in ownership and political view and never entwined in any way with the Roman Catholic Church, it has become the weather vane, the barometer of Irish life and society followed by people of all religious and political persuasions and none. The paper is politically liberal and progressive as well as being centre right on economic issues. This history is peopled by all the great figures of Irish history - Daniel O`Connell, W.B. Yeats, Garret FitzGerald, Conor Cruise O`Brien and the paper has numbered among its internationally renowned columnists Mary Holland, Fintan O'Toole, Nuala O'Faolain, John Waters and Kevin Myers . Its influence on Irish Society is beyond question. In his book, Terence Brown tells the story of the paper with narrative skill, wit and perception. Analysis of the stance of the Times during events ranging from The Easter Rising, The Civil War, the Troubles and the recent economic recession make the book essential reading for students of Irish history, be they the general reader, the academic or amateur historian. The book will be seen as crucial to our understanding of Irish history in the past century and a half.

Literature and Religion in Mid-Victorian England

From Dickens to Eliot

Author: C. Oulton

Publisher: Springer

ISBN: 0230504647

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 221

View: 4619

This book places Dickens and Wilkie Collins against such important figures as John Henry Newman and George Eliot in seeking to recover their response to the religious controversies of mid-nineteenth century England. While much recent criticism has tended to overlook or dismiss their religious pronouncements, this book foregrounds the religious aspect of their writing and relocates their most important work in the context of contemporary debate. The response of both writers is seen to be complex and fraught with tension.

Original Spin

Downing Street and the Press in Victorian Britain

Author: Paul Brighton

Publisher: I.B.Tauris

ISBN: 1780760590

Category: History

Page: 288

View: 3700

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The Transformation Of Ireland 1900-2000

Author: Diarmaid Ferriter

Publisher: Profile Books

ISBN: 1847650813

Category: History

Page: 896

View: 6702

A ground-breaking history of the twentieth century in Ireland, written on the most ambitious scale by a brilliant young historian. It is significant that it begins in 1900 and ends in 2000 - most accounts have begun in 1912 or 1922 and largely ignored the end of the century. Politics and political parties are examined in detail but high politics does not dominate the book, which rather sets out to answer the question: 'What was it like to grow up and live in 20th-century Ireland'? It deals with the North in a comprehensive way, focusing on the social and cultural aspects, not just the obvious political and religious divisions.

Visions of the Press in Britain, 1850-1950

Author: Mark Hampton

Publisher: University of Illinois Press

ISBN: 9780252029462

Category: Business & Economics

Page: 218

View: 2496

"Mark Hampton surveys a diversity of sources - parliamentary speeches and commissions, books, pamphlets, periodicals and select private correspondence - in order to identify how governmental elites, the educated public, professional journalists, and industry moguls characterized the political and cultural function of the press."--Jacket.

The Black Hand of Republicanism

The Fenians and History

Author: James McConnel,Queen's University of Belfast. School of History and Anthropology,University of Ulster. School of History & International Affairs

Publisher: N.A

ISBN: N.A

Category: History

Page: 288

View: 5907

Established in 1858, the Irish Republican Brotherhood was a secret, oath-bound movement dedicated to bringing about revolution in Ireland. This book is a result of a major conference to mark the l50th anniversary ofthe founding ofthe Irish Republican Brotherhood and includes essays on Fenianism in its diasporic, transnational and imperial context; political violence; republican ideology and popular politicisation; culture, religion and identity; and memory and commemoration. This is the fIrst publication to consider Fenianism as the truly international phenomenon it represented and includes essays from international scholars assessing the impact of Fenianism -a movement founded in America by the Irish immigrant community -throughout Ireland, Britain, continental Europe, the Americas and Australasia. The book spans the full chronological range of Fenian movement, from its origins in the aftermath of the Young Ireland movement, through its existence as a mass revolutionary movement in the 1860's, the long period as an underground revolutionary conspiracy, culminating in its role as the driving force of the Irish revolution between 1916 and 1921.

Serialization and the Novel in Mid-Victorian Magazines

Author: Catherine Delafield

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 1317057015

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 222

View: 728

Examining the Victorian serial as a text in its own right, Catherine Delafield re-reads five novels by Elizabeth Gaskell, Anthony Trollope, Dinah Craik and Wilkie Collins by situating them in the context of periodical publication. She traces the roles of the author and editor in the creation and dissemination of the texts and considers how first publication affected the consumption and reception of the novel through the periodical medium. Delafield contends that a novel in volume form has been separated from its original context, that is, from the pattern of consumption and reception presented by the serial. The novel's later re-publication still bears the imprint of this serialized original, and this book’s investigation into nineteenth-century periodicals both generates new readings of the texts and reinstates those which have been lost in the reprinting process. Delafield's case studies provide evidence of the ways in which Household Words, Cornhill Magazine, Good Words, All the Year Round and Cassell's Magazine were designed for new audiences of novel readers. Serialization and the Novel in Mid-Victorian Magazines addresses the material conditions of production, illustrates the collective and collaborative creation of the serialized novel, and contextualizes a range of texts in the nineteenth-century experience of print.

The Peacock Committee and UK Broadcasting Policy

Author: Tom O'Malley,Janet Jones

Publisher: Palgrave Macmillan

ISBN: N.A

Category: Performing Arts

Page: 272

View: 7440

This is the first full-length scholarly study of the genesis and influence of Alan Peacock's intellectually radical "Report of the Committee on Financing the BBC" (1986), which fundamentally altered the principles governing the development of broadcasting policy in the UK.

The Irish in Mid-Victorian Lancashire

The Shaping of a Working-Class Community Irish Studies

Author: W. J. Lowe

Publisher: Peter Lang Pub Incorporated

ISBN: N.A

Category: History

Page: 227

View: 5305

The Dawn of the Cheap Press in Victorian Britain

The End of the 'Taxes on Knowledge', 1849-1869

Author: Martin Hewitt

Publisher: A&C Black

ISBN: 1472513053

Category: History

Page: 272

View: 6811

The Dawn of the Cheap Press provides the first detailed study of the mid-Victorian campaign for the repeal of the taxes on knowledge for over a hundred years. Using the recently discovered papers of the Association for the Promotion of the Repeal of the Taxes on Knowledge and taking advantage of new forms of research made possible by the digitisation of nineteenth century newspapers, it assesses the impact of the removal of the last surviving legal disabilities on the newspaper industry, the nature of journalism, and the cultures and practices of newspaper reading. The book demonstrates that the campaign against the taxes on knowledge retained broad popular appeal, and played an important role in the politics of mid-Victorian budgets. It not only makes a seminal contribution to the history of the nineteenth century press and print culture, but also illuminates the culture and politics of mid-Victorian Britain, offers an important re-reading of the history of extra-parliamentary pressure group politics and provides new insights into the origins of Gladstonian Liberalism.

Reading and the Victorians

Author: Matthew Bradley,Juliet John

Publisher: Ashgate Publishing, Ltd.

ISBN: 1472401344

Category: Language Arts & Disciplines

Page: 194

View: 2430

What did reading mean to the Victorians? This question is the key point of departure for Reading and the Victorians, an examination of the era when reading underwent a swifter and more radical transformation than at any other moment in history. With book production handed over to the machines and mass education boosting literacy to unprecedented levels, the norms of modern reading were being established. Essays examine the impact of tallow candles on Victorian reading, the reading practices encouraged by Mudie's Select Library and feminist periodicals, the relationship between author and reader as reflected in manuscript revisions and corrections, the experience of reading women's diaries, models of literacy in Our Mutual Friend, the implications of reading marks in Victorian texts, how computer technology has assisted the study of nineteenth-century reading practices, how Gladstone read his personal library, and what contemporary non-academic readers might owe to Victorian ideals of reading and community. Reading forms a genuine meeting place for historians, literary scholars, theorists, librarians, and historians of the book, and this diverse collection examines nineteenth-century reading in all its personal, historical, literary, and material contexts, while also asking fundamental questions about how we read the Victorians' reading in the present day.

Low Life and Moral Improvement in Mid-Victorian England

Liverpool Through the Journalism of Hugh Shimmin

Author: Hugh Shimmin

Publisher: Burns & Oates

ISBN: N.A

Category: Social Science

Page: 254

View: 2034

Victorian Liverpool - the setting, indeed the hero, of this book - appalled and fascinated social commentators who took the trouble to inspect it. As well as the early sociologists and distinguished overseas visitors who came to wonder (men like Nathaniel Hawthorne and Frederick Olmsted) the city has its own articulate and opinionated reporter - Hugh Shimmin, journalist and newspaper proprietor. This book is an introduction to, commentary upon, and collection of his best journalism. Here is a Victorian shock city examined, judged and sentenced by a man with a keen journalistic eye, ferocious nonconformist beliefs, articulate and telling journalistic tales. From the grog shop to the dog fight, from the presentation of scientific experiments to the self-improving middle classes to the courts and alleys of Liverpool, virtually every aspect of Victorian urban life is here. The contemporary journalism is explained, placed into context and analyzed by the two social historians who have edited the book. This should appeal to anyone interested in 19th century urban history, and in the society and economics of life in the Victorian slum.

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