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Pulitzer's School

Columbia University's School of Journalism, 1903-2003

Author: James Boylan

Publisher: Columbia University Press

ISBN:

Category: History

Page: 337

View: 352

Marking the centennial of the founding of Columbia University's school of journalism, this candid history of the school's evolution is set against the backdrop of the ongoing debate over whether journalism can—or should—be taught in America's universities. Originally known as "the Pulitzer School" in honor of its chief benefactor, the newspaper magnate Joseph Pulitzer, Columbia's school of journalism has long been a significant and highly visible presence in the journalism community. But at the turn of the twentieth century, when the school was originally conceived, journalism was taught either during an apprenticeship at a newspaper office or as a vocational elective at a few state universities—no Ivy League institution had yet dared to teach a common "trade" such as journalism. It was Pulitzer's vision, and Columbia's decision to embrace and cultivate his novel idea, that would eventually help legitimize and transform the profession. Yet despite its obvious influence and prestige, the school has experienced a turbulent, even contentious history. Critics have assailed the school for being disengaged from the real world of working journalists, for being a holding tank for the mediocre and a citadel of the establishment, while supporters—with equal passion—have hailed it for upholding journalism's gold standard and for nurturing many of the profession's most successful practitioners. The debate over the school's merits and shortcomings has been strong, and at times vehement, even into the twenty-first century. In 2002, the old argument was reopened and the school found itself publicly scrutinized once again. Had it lived up to Pulitzer's original vision of a practical, uncompromising, and multifaceted education for journalists? Was its education still relevant to the needs of contemporary journalists? Yet after all the ideological arguments, and with its future still potentially in doubt, the school has remained a magnet for the ambitious and talented, an institution that provides intensive training in the skills and folkways of journalism. Granted unprecedented access to archival records, James Boylan has written the definitive account of the struggles and enduring legacy of America's premiere school of journalism.

Historical Dictionary of Journalism

Author: Ross Eaman

Publisher: Scarecrow Press

ISBN:

Category: History

Page: 432

View: 496

Journalism is the discipline of gathering, writing, and reporting news, and it includes the process of editing and presenting news articles. Journalism applies to various media, including but not limited to newspapers, magazines, radio, television, and the internet. The word 'journalist' started to become common in the early 18th century to designate a new kind of writer, about a century before 'journalism' made its appearance to describe what those writers produced. Though varying in form from one age and society to another, it gradually distinguished itself from other forms of writing through its focus on the present, its eye-witness perspective, and its reliance on everyday language. The Historical Dictionary of Journalism relates how journalism has evolved over the centuries. This is done through a chronology, an introductory essay, a bibliography, and hundreds of cross-referenced dictionary entries on the different styles of journalism, the different types of media, and important writers and editors.

The Routledge Companion to News and Journalism

Author: Stuart Allan

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN:

Category: Language Arts & Disciplines

Page: 688

View: 561

The Routledge Companion to News and Journalism presents an authoritative, comprehensive assessment of diverse forms of news media reporting – past, present and future. Including 60 chapters, written by an outstanding team of internationally respected authors, the Companion provides scholars and students with a reliable, historically informed guide to news media and journalism studies. The Companion has the following features: It is organised to address a series of themes pertinent to the on-going theoretical and methodological development of news and journalism studies around the globe. The focus encompasses news institutions, production processes, texts, and audiences. Individual chapters are problem-led, seeking to address ‘real world’ concerns that cast light on an important dimension of news and journalism – and show why it matters. Entries draw on a range of academic disciplines to explore pertinent topics, particularly around the role of journalism in democracy, such as citizenship, power and public trust. Discussion revolves primarily around academic research conducted in the UK and the US, with further contributions from other national contexts - thereby allowing international comparisons to be made. The Routledge Companion to News and Journalism provides an essential guide to key ideas, issues, concepts and debates, while also stressing the value of reinvigorating scholarship with a critical eye to developments in the professional realm. The paperback edition of this Companion includes four new chapters, focusing on news framing, newsmagazines, digital radio news, and social media. Contributors: G. Stuart Adam, Stuart Allan, Chris Atton, Brian Baresch, Geoffrey Baym, W. Lance Bennett, Rodney Benson, S. Elizabeth Bird, R. Warwick Blood, Tanja Bosch, Raymond Boyle, Bonnie Brennen, Qing Cao, Cynthia Carter, Anabela Carvalho, Deborah Chambers, Lilie Chouliaraki, Lisbeth Clausen, James R. Compton, Simon Cottle, Ros Coward, Andrew Crisell, Mark Deuze, Roger Dickinson, Wolfgang Donsbach, Mats Ekström, James S.Ettema, Natalie Fenton, Bob Franklin, Herbert J. Gans, Mark Glaser, Mark Hampton, Joseph Harker, Jackie Harrison, John Hartley, Alfred Hermida, Andrew Hoskins, Shih-Hsien Hsu, Dale Jacquette, Bengt Johansson, Richard Kaplan, Carolyn Kitch, Douglas Kellner, Larsåke Larsson, Justin Lewis, Jake Lynch, Mirca Madianou, Donald Matheson, Heidi Mau, Brian McNair, Kaitlynn Mendes, Máire Messenger Davies, Toby Miller, Martin Montgomery, Marguerite Moritz, Mohammed el-Nawawy, Henrik Örnebring, Julian Petley, Shawn Powers, Greg Philo, Stephen D. Reese, Barry Richards, David Rowe, Philip Seib, Jane B. Singer, Guy Starkey, Linda Steiner, Daya Kishan Thassu, John Tulloch, Howard Tumber, Silvio Waisbord, Gary Whannel, Andrew Williams, Barbie Zelizer

America, History and Life

Author:

Publisher:

ISBN:

Category: Canada

Page:

View: 579

Article abstracts and citations of reviews and dissertations covering the United States and Canada.

Frances R. Grant's Pan American Activities, 1929-1949

Author: David Mark Carletta

Publisher:

ISBN:

Category: America

Page: 1008

View: 802

Melvin Mencher's News Reporting and Writing

Author: Melvin Mencher

Publisher: McGraw-Hill Education

ISBN:

Category: Language Arts & Disciplines

Page: 640

View: 186

More than a quarter of a million students have learned the craft and ethics of journalism from Melvin Mencher's News Reporting and Writing. This classic text shows students the fundamentals of reporting and writing and examines the values that direct and underline the practice of journalism. The new edition features current developments in all areas of reporting, discusses the use of stark photos, provides dozens of new Internet sources and demonstrates how journalists use them. Also included in the eleventh edition are guides for campaign and election coverage, reporting tips from Pulitzer Prize winners, and an examination of recent libel cases.

The big picture

why democracies need journalistic excellence

Author: Jeffrey Scheuer

Publisher:

ISBN:

Category: Language Arts & Disciplines

Page: 187

View: 949

Freedom of the press is the cornerstone of democracy. But, as countless recent examples of lapsed standards in the press since the Jayson Blair affair have shown, the First Amendment is no guarantee that American journalism will be first-rate. A press in crisis is a democracy endangered, argues Jeffrey Scheuer--cultural critic and author of The Sound Bite Society . In his new book, The Big Picture , Scheuer argues that in order for a democracy to thrive it is not enough for its press simply to be free--the press must be exceptional. This book explores journalistic excellence and its essential relationship with democracy, explaining why democracies depend on it and are only as good as their journalism. In The Big Picture , Scheuer explores journalistic excellence from three broad perspectives. First, from the democratic perspective, he shows how journalism is a core democratic function, and journalistic excellence a core democraticvalue. Then, from an intellectual perspective, he explores the ways in which journalism addresses basic concepts of truth, knowledge, objectivity, and ideology. Finally, from an institutional perspective, he considers the role and possible future of journalism education, the importance of journalistic independence, and the potential for nonprofit journalism to meet the journalistic needs of a democratic society. In lucid and accessible prose, The Big Picture provocatively demonstrates why we must all be vigilant about the quality of journalism today.

Book Review Digest

Author:

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ISBN:

Category: Bibliography

Page:

View: 825

Choice

Publication of the Association of College and Research Libraries, a Division of the American Library Association

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Category: Best books

Page:

View: 401

Deadlines and Disruption: My Turbulent Path from Print to Digital

Author: Stephen Shepard

Publisher: McGraw Hill Professional

ISBN:

Category: Business & Economics

Page: 304

View: 951

A Top Editor’s Take on the State of Journalism Today—and His Prescient Forecast of Its Future “This is a personal and insightful book about one of the most important questions of our time: how will journalism make the transition to the digital age? Steve Shepard made that leap bravely when he went from being a great magazine editor to the first dean of the City University of New York journalism school. His tale is filled with great lessons for us all.” —Walter Isaacson, bestselling author of Steve Jobs “An insightful and convivial account of a bright, bountiful life dedicated to words, information and wonder.” —Kirkus Reviews (Starred Review) "This is two compelling books in one: Shepard’s story of his life in print journalism, and a clearheaded look at the way journalism is evolving due to electronic media, social networking, and the ability of anyone with a computer and an opinion to make him- or herself heard." —Booklist Shepard's book will resonate with many and should be read by anyone interested in the flow of information today and its simpact on society as a whole." —Library Journal “The book is in part a memoir, a tale of a life lived at the height of print journalism when print journalism itself was at its height. But it is also an analysis, an examination of the new challenges facing an old industry as it ambles and occasionally sprints its way into the digital age.” —The Washington Post About the Book: “My personal passage is, in many ways, a microcosm of the larger struggle within the journalism profession to come to terms with the digital reckoning. Will the new technologies enhance journalism . . . or water it down for audiences with diminished attention spans? What new business models will emerge to sustain quality journalism?” Stephen B. Shepard has seen it all. Editor-in-chief of BusinessWeek for more than 20 years, Shepard helped transform the magazine into one of the most respected voices of its time. But after his departure, he saw it collapse—another victim of the digital age. In Deadlines and Disruption, Shepard recounts his five decades in journalism—a time of radical transformations in the way news is developed, delivered, and consumed. Raised in the Bronx, Shepard graduated from City College and Columbia, joined BusinessWeek as a reporter, and rose to the top editorial post. He has closed the circle by returning to the university that spawned him, founding the Graduate School of Journalism at the City University of New York. In the digital age, anyone can be a journalist. Opinion pieces are replacing original reporting as the coin of the realm. And an entire generation is relying on Facebook friends and Twitter feeds to tell them what to read. Is this the beginning of an irreversible slide into third-rate journalism? Or the start of a better world of interactive, multimedia journalism? Will the news industry live up to its responsibility to forge a well-informed public? Shepard tackles all the tough questions facing journalists, the news industry, and, indeed, anyone who understands the importance of a well-informed public in a healthy democracy. The story of Shepard’s career is the story of the news industry—and in Deadlines and Disruption, he provides peerless insight into one of the most critical issues of our time.

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