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Race Decoded

The Genomic Fight for Social Justice

Author: Catherine Bliss

Publisher: Stanford University Press

ISBN:

Category: Social Science

Page: 280

View: 195

In 2000, with the success of the Human Genome Project, scientists declared the death of race in biology and medicine. But within five years, many of these same scientists had reversed course and embarked upon a new hunt for the biological meaning of race. Drawing on personal interviews and life stories, Race Decoded takes us into the world of elite genome scientists—including Francis Collins, director of the NIH; Craig Venter, the first person to create a synthetic genome; and Spencer Wells, National Geographic Society explorer-in-residence, among others—to show how and why they are formulating new ways of thinking about race. In this original exploration, Catherine Bliss reveals a paradigm shift, both at the level of science and society, from colorblindness to racial consciousness. Scientists have been fighting older understandings of race in biology while simultaneously promoting a new grand-scale program of minority inclusion. In selecting research topics or considering research design, scientists routinely draw upon personal experience of race to push the public to think about race as a biosocial entity, and even those of the most privileged racial and social backgrounds incorporate identity politics in the scientific process. Though individual scientists may view their positions differently—whether as a black civil rights activist or a white bench scientist—all stakeholders in the scientific debates are drawing on memories of racial discrimination to fashion a science-based activism to fight for social justice.

Race Decoded

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Race Decoded: The Genomic Fight for Social Justice

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Postgenomics

Perspectives on Biology after the Genome

Author: Sarah S. Richardson

Publisher: Duke University Press

ISBN:

Category: Science

Page: 304

View: 862

Ten years after the Human Genome Project’s completion the life sciences stand in a moment of uncertainty, transition, and contestation. The postgenomic era has seen rapid shifts in research methodology, funding, scientific labor, and disciplinary structures. Postgenomics is transforming our understanding of disease and health, our environment, and the categories of race, class, and gender. At the same time, the gene retains its centrality and power in biological and popular discourse. The contributors to Postgenomics analyze these ruptures and continuities and place them in historical, social, and political context. Postgenomics, they argue, forces a rethinking of the genome itself, and opens new territory for conversations between the social sciences, humanities, and life sciences. Contributors. Russ Altman, Rachel A. Ankeny, Catherine Bliss, John Dupré, Michael Fortun, Evelyn Fox Keller, Sabina Leonelli, Adrian Mackenzie, Margot Moinester, Aaron Panofsky, Sarah S. Richardson, Sara Shostak, Hallam Stevens

Decoding Racial Ideology in Genomics

Author: Johnny E. Williams

Publisher: Lexington Books

ISBN:

Category: Social Science

Page: 190

View: 302

Although the human genome exists apart from society, genomicists’ thinking is informed by their inability to escape the wake of the “race” concept. The book reveals that genomicists’ preoccupation with race—regardless of good or ill intent—contributes to its perception as a category of differences that is scientifically rigorous.

What We Now Know About Race and Ethnicity

Author: Michael Banton

Publisher: Berghahn Books

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Category: Philosophy

Page: 178

View: 569

Attempts of nineteenth-century writers to establish "race" as a biological concept failed after Charles Darwin opened the door to a new world of knowledge. Yet this word already had a place in the organization of everyday life and in ordinary English language usage. This book explains how the idea of race became so important in the USA, generating conceptual confusion that can now be clarified. Developing an international approach, it reviews references to "race," "racism," and "ethnicity" in sociology, anthropology, philosophy, and comparative politics and identifies promising lines of research that may make it possible to supersede misleading notions of race in the social sciences.

The Abolitionist Movement: Documents Decoded

Author: Christopher Cameron

Publisher: ABC-CLIO

ISBN:

Category: History

Page: 253

View: 119

Intended for high school and undergraduate students, this work provides an engaging overview of the abolitionist movement that allows readers to consider history more directly through more than 20 primary source documents. • Includes a concise introduction that summarizes the critical points in the history of slavery and abolition • Provides carefully selected key documents that represent the full range of American thoughts on slavery • Supplies useful annotations that guide the reader's analysis and shows how historians deconstruct documents • Presents information and materials that help readers to understand the forces that supported and opposed slavery, thereby giving students a better grasp of American history in general

The Computer Engineering Handbook

Author: Vojin G. Oklobdzija

Publisher: CRC Press

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Category: Computers

Page: 1408

View: 966

There is arguably no field in greater need of a comprehensive handbook than computer engineering. The unparalleled rate of technological advancement, the explosion of computer applications, and the now-in-progress migration to a wireless world have made it difficult for engineers to keep up with all the developments in specialties outside their own. References published only a few years ago are now sorely out of date. The Computer Engineering Handbook changes all of that. Under the leadership of Vojin Oklobdzija and a stellar editorial board, some of the industry's foremost experts have joined forces to create what promises to be the definitive resource for computer design and engineering. Instead of focusing on basic, introductory material, it forms a comprehensive, state-of-the-art review of the field's most recent achievements, outstanding issues, and future directions. The world of computer engineering is vast and evolving so rapidly that what is cutting-edge today may be obsolete in a few months. While exploring the new developments, trends, and future directions of the field, The Computer Engineering Handbook captures what is fundamental and of lasting value.

Journal of Anthropological Research

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Category: Anthropology

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A Life Decoded

My Genome: My Life

Author: J. Craig Venter

Publisher: Penguin UK

ISBN:

Category: Biography & Autobiography

Page: 416

View: 779

Craig Venter is no ordinary scientist, and no ordinary man. He is the first human being ever to read their own DNA – and see the key to life itself. Yet in doing so, he rocked the establishment and became embroiled in one of the biggest controversies of our age. This is the story of his incredible life: from teenage rebel and Vietnam medic, to daredevil sailor and maverick researcher, whose race to unravel the sequence of the human genome made him both hero and pariah. Incorporating his own genetic make-up into his story, this is an electrifying portrait of a man who pushed back the boundaries of the possible.

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