Search Results: refuge-an-unnatural-history-of-family-and-place

Refuge

An Unnatural History of Family and Place

Author: Terry Tempest Williams

Publisher: Vintage

ISBN: 030777273X

Category: Biography & Autobiography

Page: 336

View: 8586

In the spring of 1983 Terry Tempest Williams learned that her mother was dying of cancer. That same season, The Great Salt Lake began to rise to record heights, threatening the Bear River Migratory Bird Refuge and the herons, owls, and snowy egrets that Williams, a poet and naturalist, had come to gauge her life by. One event was nature at its most random, the other a by-product of rogue technology: Terry's mother, and Terry herself, had been exposed to the fallout of atomic bomb tests in the 1950s. As it interweaves these narratives of dying and accommodation, Refuge transforms tragedy into a document of renewal and spiritual grace, resulting in a work that has become a classic.

Refuge

An Unnatural History of Family and Place

Author: Terry Tempest Williams

Publisher: Vintage

ISBN: 0679740244

Category: Health & Fitness

Page: 304

View: 9465

The author of Leap describes her Mormon upbringing, juxtaposing these reminiscences with discussions of the flooding of a wildlife bird sanctuary and its effect on that ecosystem, and her family's legacy of cancer. Reprint. 17,500 first printing.

Refuge

An Unnatural History of Family and Place

Author: Terry Tempest Williams

Publisher: Vintage

ISBN: 030777273X

Category: Biography & Autobiography

Page: 336

View: 6043

In the spring of 1983 Terry Tempest Williams learned that her mother was dying of cancer. That same season, The Great Salt Lake began to rise to record heights, threatening the Bear River Migratory Bird Refuge and the herons, owls, and snowy egrets that Williams, a poet and naturalist, had come to gauge her life by. One event was nature at its most random, the other a by-product of rogue technology: Terry's mother, and Terry herself, had been exposed to the fallout of atomic bomb tests in the 1950s. As it interweaves these narratives of dying and accommodation, Refuge transforms tragedy into a document of renewal and spiritual grace, resulting in a work that has become a classic.

When Women Were Birds

Fifty-four Variations on Voice

Author: Terry Tempest Williams

Publisher: Macmillan

ISBN: 1250024110

Category: Biography & Autobiography

Page: 256

View: 6973

The author of the memoir Refuge offers a meditation on the meaning of a strange legacy that her mother left her--three shelves of the elder woman's "journals," all discovered by the author after her mother's death to be empty.

The Open Space of Democracy

Author: Terry Tempest Williams

Publisher: Wipf and Stock Publishers

ISBN: 160899208X

Category: Political Science

Page: 138

View: 2076

Terry Tempest Williams presents a sharp-edged perspective on the ethics and politics of place, spiritual democracy, and the responsibilities of citizen engagement. By turns elegiac, inspiring, and passionate, The Open Space of Democracy offers a fresh perspective on the critical questions of our time.

Finding Beauty in a Broken World

Author: Terry Tempest Williams

Publisher: Vintage

ISBN: 0307377784

Category: Nature

Page: 432

View: 7346

"Shards of glass can cut and wound or magnify a vision," Terry Tempest Williams tells us. "Mosaic celebrates brokenness and the beauty of being brought together." Ranging from Ravenna, Italy, where she learns the ancient art of mosaic, to the American Southwest, where she observes prairie dogs on the brink of extinction, to a small village in Rwanda where she joins genocide survivors to build a memorial from the rubble of war, Williams searches for meaning and community in an era of physical and spiritual fragmentation. In her compassionate meditation on how nature and humans both collide and connect, Williams affirms a reverence for all life, and constructs a narrative of hopeful acts, taking that which is broken and creating something whole.

The Hour of Land

A Personal Topography of America's National Parks

Author: Terry Tempest Williams

Publisher: Sarah Crichton Books

ISBN: 0374712263

Category: Nature

Page: 416

View: 5050

America’s national parks are breathing spaces in a world in which such spaces are steadily disappearing, which is why more than 300 million people visit the parks each year. Now Terry Tempest Williams, the author of the environmental classic Refuge and the beloved memoir When Women Were Birds, returns with The Hour of Land, a literary celebration of our national parks, an exploration of what they mean to us and what we mean to them. From the Grand Tetons in Wyoming to Acadia in Maine to Big Bend in Texas and more, Williams creates a series of lyrical portraits that illuminate the unique grandeur of each place while delving into what it means to shape a landscape with its own evolutionary history into something of our own making. Part memoir, part natural history, and part social critique, The Hour of Land is a meditation and a manifesto on why wild lands matter to the soul of America.

Leap

Author: Terry Tempest Williams

Publisher: Vintage

ISBN: 1101912421

Category: Biography & Autobiography

Page: 352

View: 5228

With Leap, Terry Tempest Williams, award-winning author of Refuge, offers a sustained meditation on passion, faith, and creativity-based upon her transcendental encounter with Hieronymus Bosch's medieval masterpiece The Garden of Delights. Williams examines this vibrant landscape with unprecedented acuity, recognizing parallels between the artist's prophetic vision and her own personal experiences as a Mormon and a naturalist. Searing in its spiritual, intellectual, and emotional courage, Williams's divine journey enables her to realize the full extent of her faith and through her exquisite imagination opens our eyes to the splendor of the world.

Red

Passion and Patience in the Desert

Author: Terry Tempest Williams

Publisher: Vintage

ISBN: 9780307559401

Category: Nature

Page: 288

View: 8579

In this potent collage of stories, essays, and testimony, Williams makes a stirring case for the preservation of America’s Redrock Wilderness in the canyon country of southern Utah. As passionate as she is persuasive, Williams, the beloved author of Refuge, is one of the country’s most eloquent and imaginative writers. The desert is her blood. Here she writes lyrically about the desert’s power and vulnerability, describing wonders that range from an ancient Puebloan sash of macaw feathers found in Canyonlands National Park to the desert tortoise–an animal that can “teach us the slow art of revolutionary patience” as it extends our notion of kinship with all life. She examines the civil war being waged in the West today over public and private uses of land–an issue that divides even her own family. With grace, humor, and compassionate intelligence, Williams reminds us that the preservation of wildness is not simply a political process but a spiritual one.

An Unspoken Hunger

Author: Terry Tempest Williams

Publisher: Vintage

ISBN: 110191243X

Category: Nature

Page: 160

View: 2882

The acclaimed author of Refuge here weaves together a resonant and often rhapsodic manifesto on behalf of the landscapes she loves, combining the power of her observations in the field with her personal experience—as a woman, a Mormon, and a Westerner. Through the grace of her stories we come to see how a lack of intimacy with the natural world has initiated a lack of intimacy with each other. Williams shadows lions on the Serengeti and spots night herons in the Bronx. She pays homage to the rogue spirits of Edward Abbey and Georgia O’Keeffe, contemplates the unfathomable wildness of bears, and directs us to a politics of place. The result is an utterly persuasive book—one that has the power to change the way we live upon the earth.

The Story of My Heart - My Autobiography

Author: Richard Jefferies

Publisher: Read Books Ltd

ISBN: 1473346835

Category: Biography & Autobiography

Page: 91

View: 4738

First published in 1883, “The Story of My Heart” is a book by English nature writer Richard Jefferies. It is often described as a “spiritual autobiography”, within which Jefferies envisions the English countryside as a utopia. This book is highly recommended for those with an interest in transcendental literature, and it is not to be missed by fans and collectors of Jefferies' seminal work. John Richard Jefferies (1848 – 1887) was an English nature writer. He is famous for his exceptional depictions of English country life in his natural history books, essays, and novels. Most of his major works were inspired by his early life spent on a small farm in Wiltshire, England. Other notable works by this author include: “The Story of My Heart (1883), an exposition of his experience of the world, and “After London” (1885), an fantastic example of classic science fiction. Many vintage books such as this are becoming increasingly scarce and expensive. We are republishing this volume now in an affordable, modern, high-quality edition complete with a specially commissioned new biography of the author.

Refuge

A Novel

Author: Dina Nayeri

Publisher: Penguin

ISBN: 1594487057

Category: FICTION

Page: 322

View: 1393

"An Iranian girl escapes to America as a child, but her father stays behind. Over twenty years, as she transforms from confused immigrant to overachieving Westerner to sophisticated European transplant, daughter and father know each other only from their visits: four crucial visits over two decades, each in a different international city. The longer they are apart, the more their lives diverge, but also the more each comes to need the other's wisdom and, ultimately, rescue"--Amazon.com.

Mariposas Nocturnas

Moths of Central and South America, A Study in Beauty and Diversity

Author: Emmet Gowin

Publisher: Princeton University Press

ISBN: 0691176892

Category: Art

Page: 144

View: 2902

A stunning portrait of the nocturnal moths of Central and South America by famed American photographer Emmet Gowin American photographer Emmet Gowin (b. 1941) is best known for his portraits of his wife, Edith, and their family, as well as for his images documenting the impact of human activity upon landscapes around the world. For the past fifteen years, he has been engaged in an equally profound project on a different scale, capturing the exquisite beauty of more than one thousand species of nocturnal moths in Bolivia, Brazil, Ecuador, French Guiana, and Panama. These stunning color portraits present the insects—many of which may never have been photographed as living specimens before, and some of which may not be seen again—arrayed in typologies of twenty-five per sheet. The moths are photographed alive, in natural positions and postures, and set against a variety of backgrounds taken from the natural world and images from art history. Throughout Gowin’s distinguished career, his work has addressed urgent concerns. The arresting images of Mariposas Nocturnas extend this reach, as Gowin fosters awareness for a part of nature that is generally left unobserved and calls for a greater awareness of the biodiversity and value of the tropics as a universally shared natural treasure. An essay by Gowin provides a fascinating personal history of his work with biologists and introduces both the photographic and philosophical processes behind this extraordinary project. Essential reading for audiences both in photography and natural history, this lavishly illustrated volume reminds readers that, as Terry Tempest Williams writes in her foreword, “The world is saturated with loveliness, inhabited by others far more adept at living with uncertainty than we are.”

The Secret Language of Snow

Author: Terry Tempest Williams,Ted Major

Publisher: Pantheon

ISBN: N.A

Category: Arctic regions

Page: 129

View: 9576

Examines over a dozen different types of snow and snowy conditions through the vocabulary of the Inuit people of Alaska. Discusses the physical properties and formation of the snow and how it affects the plants, animals, and people of the Arctic.

Manmade Breast Cancers

Author: Zillah R. Eisenstein

Publisher: Cornell University Press

ISBN: 9780801487071

Category: Health & Fitness

Page: 189

View: 5396

A new understanding of humanity and feminism from the starting point of breast health is the ultimate goal of Zillah Eisenstein's political memoir of her family's experience with breast cancer. The well-known feminist author argues that politics always needs the personal, and that the personal is never enough on its own. Her return to the personal side of the political combines the two for a radicalized way of seeing, viewing, and knowing.The author strives to bring together a critique of environmental damage and the health of women's bodies, gain perspective on the role race plays as a factor in breast cancers and in political agendas, link prevention and treatment, and connect individual support and political change.Eisenstein was sixteen when her forty-five-year-old mother successfully battled breast cancer. Her two sisters, Sarah and Giah, were in their twenties when they were diagnosed, but neither of them survived. She received her own diagnosis when she was forty. Despite her family history, however, Eisenstein rejects the simple argument that genes are simply determining, rather than liable to influence by external factors. She also questions the dominance of the theory that breast cancer is caused by high lifetime exposure to estrogen. Instead, she views breast cancer as an environmental disease, best understood in terms of ecological, racial, economic, and sexual influences on individual women. She uses the term "manmade" to indicate not only industrial carcinogens and other cultural causes, but also the male-dominated and -defined scientific practices of research and treatment.In response, Manmade Breast Cancers offers a retelling of the meaning of breast cancer and a discussion of universal feminist issues about the body. The author says she writes "to discover a more just globe which will treasure the health of all of our bodies." The emotional depth and intellectual breadth of her argument adds new dimensions to how we understand breast cancer.

The Illuminated Desert

Author: Terry Tempest Williams,Chloe Hedden

Publisher: Canyonlands National Hist Assn

ISBN: 9780937407110

Category: Juvenile Fiction

Page: 40

View: 2396

A stunning dialogue between two daughters of the Colorado Plateau; an exquisite rendering of the red rock canyons of southern Utah and the natural history that evokes a poetry of place

Desert Quartet

Author: Terry Tempest Williams

Publisher: Pantheon

ISBN: N.A

Category: Science

Page: 62

View: 9110

An inspirational journey follows the experiences of a woman as she embraces the four elements--earth, fire, water, and air--in a desert landscape setting and, along the way, comes to terms with her past, body, and self. 30,000 first printing. Tour.

Pieces of White Shell

A Journey to Navajoland

Author: Terry Tempest Williams

Publisher: UNM Press

ISBN: 9780826309693

Category: History

Page: 162

View: 5493

This unusual book is an introduction to Navajo culture by a storyteller. Steeped in the lore of the Navajo reservation, where she worked as a teacher, the author came to see Navajo legend and ritual as touchstones for evaluating her own experience. She presents them here as a means for all people to locate their own history, traditions, and sense of how to live well. "To know the oral tradition of Native American people is to feel the sensitivity and sensuality of language in its clearest motion and light, and this Williams has achieved in her appreciation of that tradition."--Simon Ortiz "Pieces of White Shellis vibrant--full of risk, gentleness, wonder, and humility."--Barry Lopez "This book is both informative and enormously evocative. Exposition and description are powerfully reinforced by recurrent passages in the mode of poetry and drama."--Brewster Ghiselin

Who Owns the West?

Author: William Kittredge

Publisher: N.A

ISBN: N.A

Category: History

Page: 168

View: 3260

Essays explore the American West of long ago, present portraits of inhabitants of the West, and examine the struggles of living in the West today

Living Downstream

An Ecologist Looks at Cancer and the Environment

Author: Sandra Steingraber

Publisher: Virago Press

ISBN: 9781860495359

Category: Cancer

Page: 357

View: 2378

Published more than three decades after Rachel Carson's Silent Spring warned of the impact of chemicals on the environment, this book offers a critique of current thinking on cancer and its causes. It argues that the evidence has been wilfully ignored, and that the environment is still being poisoned. Throughout her study, the author weaves two stories - of Rachel Carson and her battle to be heard and of her own cancer of the bladder, which she traces back to agricultural and industrial contamination.

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