Search Results: renegotiating-the-world-order

Renegotiating the World Order

Institutional Change in International Relations

Author: Phillip Y. Lipscy

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

ISBN: 110810794X

Category: Political Science

Page: N.A

View: 7244

Rising powers often seek to reshape the world order, triggering confrontations with those who seek to defend the status quo. In recent years, as international institutions have grown in prevalence and influence, they have increasingly become central arenas for international contestation. Phillip Y. Lipscy examines how international institutions evolve as countries seek to renegotiate the international order. He offers a new theory of institutional change and explains why some institutions change flexibly while others successfully resist or fall to the wayside. The book uses a wealth of empirical evidence - quantitative and qualitative - to evaluate the theory from international organizations such as the International Monetary Fund, World Bank, European Union, League of Nations, United Nations, the International Telecommunications Satellite Organization, and the Internet Corporation for Assigned Names and Numbers. The book will be of particular interest to scholars interested in the historical and contemporary diplomacy of the United States, Japan, and China.

Renegotiating the World Order

Author: Phillip Y. Lipscy

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

ISBN: 1107149762

Category: Political Science

Page: 348

View: 4121

Rising powers often seek to reshape the world order, triggering confrontations with those who seek to defend the status quo. In recent years, as international institutions have grown in prevalence and influence, they have increasingly become central arenas for international contestation. Phillip Y. Lipscy examines how international institutions evolve as countries seek to renegotiate the international order. He offers a new theory of institutional change and explains why some institutions change flexibly while others successfully resist or fall to the wayside. The book uses a wealth of empirical evidence - quantitative and qualitative - to evaluate the theory from international organizations such as the International Monetary Fund, World Bank, European Union, League of Nations, United Nations, the International Telecommunications Satellite Organization, and Internet Corporation for Assigned Names and Numbers. The book will be of particular interest to scholars interested in the historical and contemporary diplomacy of the United States, Japan, and China.

Renegotiating the World Order

Institutional Change in International Relations

Author: Phillip Y. Lipscy

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

ISBN: 9781316604281

Category: Political Science

Page: 341

View: 2086

Rising powers often seek to reshape the world order, triggering confrontations with those who seek to defend the status quo. In recent years, as international institutions have grown in prevalence and influence, they have increasingly become central arenas for international contestation. Phillip Y. Lipscy examines how international institutions evolve as countries seek to renegotiate the international order. He offers a new theory of institutional change and explains why some institutions change flexibly while others successfully resist or fall to the wayside. The book uses a wealth of empirical evidence - quantitative and qualitative - to evaluate the theory from international organizations such as the International Monetary Fund, World Bank, European Union, League of Nations, United Nations, the International Telecommunications Satellite Organization, and Internet Corporation for Assigned Names and Numbers. The book will be of particular interest to scholars interested in the historical and contemporary diplomacy of the United States, Japan, and China.

US Civil-Military Relations After 9/11

Renegotiating the Civil-Military Bargain

Author: Mackubin Thomas Owens

Publisher: Bloomsbury Publishing USA

ISBN: 144118306X

Category: Political Science

Page: 224

View: 1510

A thorough survey of the key issues that surround the relations between the military and its civilian control in the US today.

World Order

Author: Henry Kissinger

Publisher: Penguin

ISBN: 0698165721

Category: Political Science

Page: 432

View: 9245

“Dazzling and instructive . . . [a] magisterial new book.” —Walter Isaacson, Time Henry Kissinger offers in World Order a deep meditation on the roots of international harmony and global disorder. Drawing on his experience as one of the foremost statesmen of the modern era—advising presidents, traveling the world, observing and shaping the central foreign policy events of recent decades—Kissinger now reveals his analysis of the ultimate challenge for the twenty-first century: how to build a shared international order in a world of divergent historical perspectives, violent conflict, proliferating technology, and ideological extremism. There has never been a true “world order,” Kissinger observes. For most of history, civilizations defined their own concepts of order. Each considered itself the center of the world and envisioned its distinct principles as universally relevant. China conceived of a global cultural hierarchy with the emperor at its pinnacle. In Europe, Rome imagined itself surrounded by barbarians; when Rome fragmented, European peoples refined a concept of an equilibrium of sovereign states and sought to export it across the world. Islam, in its early centuries, considered itself the world’s sole legitimate political unit, destined to expand indefinitely until the world was brought into harmony by religious principles. The United States was born of a conviction about the universal applicability of democracy—a conviction that has guided its policies ever since. Now international affairs take place on a global basis, and these historical concepts of world order are meeting. Every region participates in questions of high policy in every other, often instantaneously. Yet there is no consensus among the major actors about the rules and limits guiding this process or its ultimate destination. The result is mounting tension. Grounded in Kissinger’s deep study of history and his experience as national security advisor and secretary of state, World Order guides readers through crucial episodes in recent world history. Kissinger offers a unique glimpse into the inner deliberations of the Nixon administration’s negotiations with Hanoi over the end of the Vietnam War, as well as Ronald Reagan’s tense debates with Soviet Premier Gorbachev in Reykjavík. He offers compelling insights into the future of U.S.–China relations and the evolution of the European Union, and he examines lessons of the conflicts in Iraq and Afghanistan. Taking readers from his analysis of nuclear negotiations with Iran through the West’s response to the Arab Spring and tensions with Russia over Ukraine, World Order anchors Kissinger’s historical analysis in the decisive events of our time. Provocative and articulate, blending historical insight with geopolitical prognostication, World Order is a unique work that could come only from a lifelong policy maker and diplomat.

Negotiating Life

Secrets for Everyday Diplomacy and Deal Making

Author: J. Salacuse

Publisher: Springer

ISBN: 1137318740

Category: Business & Economics

Page: 232

View: 9754

A complement to the successful The Global Negotiator: Making, Managing, and Mending Deals Around the World in the Twenty-First Century (Palgrave, 2003), Salacuse's new work is a comprehensive and easy-to-understand look at negotiation in everyday life. Drawing from his extensive experience around the world, Salacuse applies such large-scale examples as the Arab-Israeli conflicts or those in Berlin and shows us how to use such strategies in our own lives, from family and home life, to business and the workplace, even to our own thoughts as we negotiate compromises and agreement with ourselves.Arguing that life is really a series of negotiations, deal making, and diplomacy, Salacuse gives readers the tools to make the most of any situation.

Never Split the Difference

Negotiating As If Your Life Depended On It

Author: Chris Voss,Tahl Raz

Publisher: HarperCollins

ISBN: 0062407813

Category: Business & Economics

Page: 288

View: 348

A former international hostage negotiator for the FBI offers a new, field-tested approach to high-stakes negotiations—whether in the boardroom or at home. After a stint policing the rough streets of Kansas City, Missouri, Chris Voss joined the FBI, where his career as a hostage negotiator brought him face-to-face with a range of criminals, including bank robbers and terrorists. Reaching the pinnacle of his profession, he became the FBI’s lead international kidnapping negotiator. Never Split the Difference takes you inside the world of high-stakes negotiations and into Voss’s head, revealing the skills that helped him and his colleagues succeed where it mattered most: saving lives. In this practical guide, he shares the nine effective principles—counterintuitive tactics and strategies—you too can use to become more persuasive in both your professional and personal life. Life is a series of negotiations you should be prepared for: buying a car, negotiating a salary, buying a home, renegotiating rent, deliberating with your partner. Taking emotional intelligence and intuition to the next level, Never Split the Difference gives you the competitive edge in any discussion.

The World Reimagined

Author: Mark Philip Bradley

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

ISBN: 0521829755

Category: History

Page: 320

View: 4503

This book uncovers how human rights gained meaning and power for Americans in the 1940s, the 1970s and today.

The Continent of International Law

Explaining Agreement Design

Author: Barbara Koremenos

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

ISBN: 1316586375

Category: Political Science

Page: N.A

View: 3132

Every year, states negotiate, conclude, sign, and give effect to hundreds of new international agreements. Koremenos argues that the detailed design provisions of such agreements matter for phenomena that scholars, policymakers, and the public care about: when and how international cooperation occurs and is maintained. Theoretically, Koremenos develops hypotheses regarding how cooperation problems like incentives to cheat can be confronted and moderated through law's detailed design provisions. Empirically, she exploits her data set composed of a random sample of international agreements in economics, the environment, human rights and security. Her theory and testing lead to a consequential discovery: considering the vagaries of international politics, international cooperation looks more law-like than anarchical, with the detailed provisions of international law chosen in ways that increase the prospects and robustness of cooperation. This nuanced and sophisticated 'continent of international law' can speak to scholars in any discipline where institutions, and thus institutional design, matter.

Renegotiating the Body

Feminist Art in 1970s London

Author: Kathy Battista

Publisher: I.B.Tauris

ISBN: 1848859619

Category: Art

Page: 207

View: 2893

Emphasizing the importance of artists including Bobby Baker, Anne Bean, Catherine Elwes, Rose English, Alexis Hunter, Hannah O'Shea, and Kate Walker, and examining works such as Mary Kelly's Post Partum Document, Judy Clark's 1973 exhibition Issues, and Cosey Fanni Tutti's Prostitution shown in 1976, the author investigates some art pieces from the 1970s in Britain. From the perspective of the feminist body as site for making and exhibiting works the author examines themes that look at the body as material, the body and performance, and the alternative creative platforms in 1970s feminist art.

Granting and Renegotiating Infrastructure Concessions

Doing it Right

Author: J. Luis Guasch

Publisher: World Bank Publications

ISBN: 9780821357927

Category: Business & Economics

Page: 194

View: 3570

During the 1990s, infrastructure concessions were hailed as the solution to Latin America's endemic infrastructure deficit, by combining private sector efficiency with rent dissipation brought about by competition. This publication examines the design and implementation of over 1,000 examples of concession contracts, in order to identify the problems that have occurred in the process. It goes on to highlight lessons to be learned for the future, in order to realise the potential benefits of infrastructure reform and to contribute to economic growth and poverty reduction.

(Re)Negotiating East and Southeast Asia

Region, Regionalism, and the Association of Southeast Asian Nations

Author: Alice D. Ba

Publisher: Stanford University Press

ISBN: 9780804776301

Category: Political Science

Page: 344

View: 2155

This book seeks to explain two core paradoxes associated with the Association of Southeast Asian Nations (ASEAN): How have diverse states hung together and stabilized relations in the face of competing interests, divergent preferences, and arguably weak cooperation? How has a group of lesser, self-identified Southeast Asian powers gone beyond its original regional purview to shape the form and content of Asian Pacific and East Asian regionalisms? According to Alice Ba, the answers lie in ASEAN's founding arguments: arguments that were premised on an assumed regional disunity. She demonstrates how these arguments draw critical causal connections that make Southeast Asian regionalism a necessary response to problems, give rise to its defining informality and consensus-seeking process, and also constrain ASEAN's regionalism. Tracing debates about ASEAN's intra- and extra-regional relations over four decades, she argues for a process-driven view of cooperation, sheds light on intervening processes of argument and debate, and highlights interacting material, ideational, and social forces in the construction of regions and regionalisms.

The Transition of Global Order

Legitimacy and Contestation

Author: Maximilian Terhalle

Publisher: Palgrave Macmillan

ISBN: 9781137386892

Category: Political Science

Page: 288

View: 6435

Why do international orders lack systemic legitimacy? This study examines the developing relationship between the US and China and explores the ways in which these two global powers are transitioning to a new global order, albeit one with significant risks and uncertainties for governance and legitimacy. Terhalle argues that the financial crisis of 2008/09 established China as the key challenger to the United States amid a process of order transition. Subsequent disagreements between these two powers about the future shape of the global order's legitimacy have manifested themselves in their intense competition with regard to spheres of influence in East Asia, the environment and ideology-related aspects of the order. In positing a new theoretical framework for understanding order and legitimacy in International Relations, The Transition of Global Order offers a significant contribution to the debate around world politics and the new global order.

Uncharted

Big Data as a Lens on Human Culture

Author: Erez Aiden,Jean-Baptiste Michel

Publisher: Penguin

ISBN: 1594632901

Category: Computers

Page: 288

View: 7212

Identifying data as one of the world's greatest untapped resources, two Harvard scientists who with Google created the Ngram Viewer reveal how the powerful web-based search tool has identified compelling cultural trends that impacting current understandings in science, the humanities, politics and business. 30,000 first printing.

Japan Under the DPJ

The Politics of Transition and Governance

Author: Kenji E. Kushida,Phillip Y. Lipscy

Publisher: Asia-Pacific Research Network

ISBN: 9781931368339

Category: Political Science

Page: 444

View: 2763

The Democratic Party of Japan (DPJ) came to power in 2009 with a commanding majority, ending fifty years of almost uninterrupted Liberal Democratic Party (LDP) rule. What explains the DPJ's rapid rise to power? Why has policy change under the DPJ been limited, despite high expectations and promises of bold reform? Why has the party been paralyzed by internecine conflict? This volume examines the DPJ's ascendance and its policies once in power. Chapters in the volume cover: DPJ candidate recruitment, the influence of media coverage, nationalization of elections, electoral system constraints on policy change, the role of third parties, municipal mergers, the role of women, transportation policy, fiscal decentralization, information technology, response to the Fukushima nuclear disaster, security strategy, and foreign policy. Japan under the DPJ makes important contributions to the study of Japanese politics, while drawing upon and advancing scholarship on a wider range of issues of interest to political scientists. Contributors include Kenneth McElwain (University of Michigan), Ethan Scheiner (University of CaliforniaDavis), Steven Reed (Chuo University, Japan ), Kay Shimizu (Columbia University), Daniel Smith (Stanford University), Robert Pekkanen (University of Washington), Ellis Krauss (University of CaliforniaSan Diego), Yukio Maeda (University of Tokyo), Linda Hasunuma (Franklin and Marshall College), Alisa Gaunder (Southwestern University), Christopher Hughes (University of Warwick, UK), and Daniel Sneider (Stanford University).

Fighting for Credibility

US Reputation and International Politics

Author: Frank P. Harvey,John Mitton

Publisher: University of Toronto Press

ISBN: 1487511760

Category: Political Science

Page: 312

View: 2403

When Bashar al-Assad used chemical weapons against his own people in Syria, he clearly crossed President Barack Obama’s "red line." At the time, many argued that the president had to bomb in order to protect America's reputation for toughness, and therefore its credibility, abroad; others countered that concerns regarding reputation were overblown, and that reputations are irrelevant for coercive diplomacy. Whether international reputations matter is the question at the heart of Fighting for Credibility. For skeptics, past actions and reputations have no bearing on an adversary’s assessment of credibility; power and interests alone determine whether a threat is believed. Using a nuanced and sophisticated theory of rational deterrence, Frank P. Harvey and John Mitton argue the opposite: ignoring reputations sidesteps important factors about how adversaries perceive threats. Focusing on cases of asymmetric US encounters with smaller powers since the end of the Cold War including Bosnia, Kosovo, Iraq, and Syria, Harvey and Mitton reveal that reputations matter for credibility in international politics. This dynamic and deeply documented study successfully brings reputation back to the table of foreign diplomacy.

Islam and the Secular State

Author: Abdullahi Ahmed An-Na'im Na,ʻAbd Allāh Aḥmad Naʻīm

Publisher: Harvard University Press

ISBN: 0674033760

Category: Religion

Page: 336

View: 9850

What should be the place of Shari'a - Islamic religious law - in predominantly Muslim societies of the world? In this book, a Muslim scholar and human rights activist envisions a positive and sustainable role for Shari'a, based on a profound rethinking of the relationship between religion and the secular state in all societies.

The Struggle for Order

Hegemony, Hierarchy, and Transition in Post-Cold War East Asia

Author: Evelyn Goh

Publisher: Oxford University Press

ISBN: 019959936X

Category: Political Science

Page: 267

View: 671

How has world order changed since the Cold War ended? Do we live in an age of American empire, or is global power shifting to the East with the rise of China? Arguing that existing ideas about balance of power and power transition are inadequate, this book gives an innovative reinterpretation of the changing nature of U.S. power, focused on the 'order transition' in East Asia. Hegemonic power is based on both coercion and consent, and hegemony is crucially underpinned by shared norms and values. Thus hegemons must constantly legitimize their unequal power to other states. In periods of strategic change, the most important political dynamics centre on this bargaining process, conceived here as the negotiation of a social compact. This book studies the re-negotiation of this consensual compact between the U.S., China, and other states in post-Cold War East Asia. It analyses institutional bargains to constrain and justify power; attempts to re-define the relationship between a regional community and the global economic order; the evolution of great power authority in regional conflict management, and the salience of competing justice claims in memory disputes. It finds that U.S. hegemony has been established in East Asia after the Cold War mainly because of the complicity of key regional states. But the new social compact also makes room for rising powers and satisfies smaller states' insecurities. The book controversially proposes that the East Asian order is multi-tiered and hierarchical, led by the U.S. but incorporating China, Japan, and other states in the layers below it.

The Objectives of the new international economic order

Author: Ervin László

Publisher: Pergamon

ISBN: N.A

Category: Business & Economics

Page: 257

View: 6424

Playing Changes

Jazz for the New Century

Author: Nate Chinen

Publisher: Pantheon

ISBN: 1101870354

Category: Music

Page: 288

View: 1249

One of jazz’s leading critics gives us an invigorating, richly detailed portrait of the artists and events that have shaped the music of our time. Grounded in authority and brimming with style, Playing Changes is the first book to take the measure of this exhilarating moment: it is a compelling argument for the resiliency of the art form and a rejoinder to any claims about its calcification or demise. “Playing changes,” in jazz parlance, has long referred to an improviser’s resourceful path through a chord progression. Playing Changes boldly expands on the idea, highlighting a host of significant changes—ideological, technological, theoretical, and practical—that jazz musicians have learned to navigate since the turn of the century. Nate Chinen, who has chronicled this evolution firsthand throughout his journalistic career, vividly sets the backdrop, charting the origins of jazz historicism and the rise of an institutional framework for the music. He traces the influence of commercialized jazz education and reflects on the implications of a globalized jazz ecology. He unpacks the synergies between jazz and postmillennial hip-hop and R&B, illuminating an emergent rhythm signature for the music. And he shows how a new generation of shape-shifting elders, including Wayne Shorter and Henry Threadgill, have moved the aesthetic center of the music. Woven throughout the book is a vibrant cast of characters—from the saxophonists Steve Coleman and Kamasi Washington to the pianists Jason Moran and Vijay Iyer to the bassist and singer Esperanza Spalding—who have exerted an important influence on the scene. This is an adaptive new music for a complex new reality, and Playing Changes is the definitive guide.

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