Renegotiating The World Order PDF EPUB Download

Renegotiating The World Order also available in docx and mobi. Read Renegotiating The World Order online, read in mobile or Kindle.

Renegotiating the World Order

Author: Phillip Y. Lipscy

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

ISBN:

Category: Political Science

Page: 348

View: 593

Rising powers often seek to reshape the world order, triggering confrontations with those who seek to defend the status quo. In recent years, as international institutions have grown in prevalence and influence, they have increasingly become central arenas for international contestation. Phillip Y. Lipscy examines how international institutions evolve as countries seek to renegotiate the international order. He offers a new theory of institutional change and explains why some institutions change flexibly while others successfully resist or fall to the wayside. The book uses a wealth of empirical evidence - quantitative and qualitative - to evaluate the theory from international organizations such as the International Monetary Fund, World Bank, European Union, League of Nations, United Nations, the International Telecommunications Satellite Organization, and Internet Corporation for Assigned Names and Numbers. The book will be of particular interest to scholars interested in the historical and contemporary diplomacy of the United States, Japan, and China.

Keeping the World Disarmed

Author: Arthur Ocean Waskow

Publisher:

ISBN:

Category: Disarmament

Page: 87

View: 297

Negotiating World Order

The Artisanship and Architecture of Global Diplomacy

Author: Alan K. Henrikson

Publisher: Scholarly Resources Incorporated

ISBN:

Category: Law

Page: 265

View: 513

The Struggle for Order

Hegemony, Hierarchy, and Transition in Post-Cold War East Asia

Author: Evelyn Goh

Publisher: OUP Oxford

ISBN:

Category: Political Science

Page: 286

View: 785

How has world order changed since the Cold War ended? Do we live in an age of American empire, or is global power shifting to the East with the rise of China? Arguing that existing ideas about balance of power and power transition are inadequate, this book gives an innovative reinterpretation of the changing nature of U.S. power, focused on the 'order transition' in East Asia. Hegemonic power is based on both coercion and consent, and hegemony is crucially underpinned by shared norms and values. Thus hegemons must constantly legitimize their unequal power to other states. In periods of strategic change, the most important political dynamics centre on this bargaining process, conceived here as the negotiation of a social compact. This book studies the re-negotiation of this consensual compact between the U.S., China, and other states in post-Cold War East Asia. It analyses institutional bargains to constrain and justify power; attempts to re-define the relationship between a regional community and the global economic order; the evolution of great power authority in regional conflict management, and the salience of competing justice claims in memory disputes. It finds that U.S. hegemony has been established in East Asia after the Cold War mainly because of the complicity of key regional states. But the new social compact also makes room for rising powers and satisfies smaller states' insecurities. The book controversially proposes that the East Asian order is multi-tiered and hierarchical, led by the U.S. but incorporating China, Japan, and other states in the layers below it.

Reframing the International

Law, Culture, Politics

Author: Richard A. Falk

Publisher: Psychology Press

ISBN:

Category: Law

Page: 258

View: 613

Re-Framing the International insists that, if we are to properly face the challenges of the coming century, we need to re-examine international politics and development through the prism of ethics and morality. International relations must now contend with a widening circle of participants reflecting the diversity and unevenness of status, memory, gender, race, culture and class. This volume challenge North America's privileged position in world politics, suggest initiatives for improving the quality of human existence in tangible ways, and critique the conventional wisdom on how we think we can create peace and justice. It shows that, when we develop projects for world reform, we must remember that the most basic prevailing assumptions of modern law, politics, and culture are by no means as obvious, natural, or progressive as we formerly thought.

America, the EU and Strategic Culture

Renegotiating the Transatlantic Bargain

Author: Asle Toje

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN:

Category: History

Page: 224

View: 743

This book provides a provocative analysis of relations between Europe and America during the tempestuous years 1998-2004. Analysing EU foreign policy, it concludes that the lessons learnt in interacting with America have been crucial in shaping the emerging EU strategic culture. The book challenges established orthodoxy regarding the sui generis nature of the European Union. Through detailed case-studies, it shows how the US influenced decisions during the formative years of the EU foreign and security policy: during the 1999 Kosovo war, the EU and NATO enlargement processes, and the 2003 Iraq crisis. However, the book argues that although policy ends may be lead by the US, the EU is growing increasingly confident in selecting distinctively ‘European’ means to achieve these goals. These findings have important implications for understanding both the EU as a foreign policy actor and of the EU-US partnership at the start of the 21st century.

Negotiating Decolonization in the United Nations

Politics of Space, Identity, and International Community

Author: Vrushali Patil

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN:

Category: Social Science

Page: 206

View: 943

Combining discourse and comparative historical methods of analysis, this book explores how colonialists and anti-colonialists renegotiated transnational power relationships within the debates on decolonization in the United Nations from 1946-1960. Shrewdly bringing together Sociology, Women’s Studies, History, and Postcolonial Studies, it is interested in the following questions: how are modern constructions of gender and race forged in transnational – colonial as well as ‘postcolonial’ – processes? How did they emerge in and contribute to such processes during the colonial era? Specifically, how did they shape colonialist constructions of space, identity and international community? How has this relationship shifted with legal decolonization?

US Foreign Policy Since 1945

Author: Alan P. Dobson

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN:

Category: History

Page: 288

View: 516

US Foreign Policy since 1945 is an essential introduction to postwar US foreign policy. It combines chronologic and thematic chapters to provide an historical account of US policy and to explore key questions about its design, control and effects. New features of this second edition include: expanded coverage of the Cold War new chapters on the post-Cold War era a chronology and a new conclusion that draws together key themes and looks to the future. Covering topics from American foreign policy-making, US power and democratic control, through to Cold War debates, economic warfare, WMDs and the war on terrorism, US Foreign Policy since 1945 is the ideal introduction to the topic for students of politics and international relations.

Banks, petrodollars, and sovereign debtors

blood from a stone?

Author: Penelope Hartland-Thunberg

Publisher: Free Press

ISBN:

Category: Business & Economics

Page: 193

View: 662

Becoming Austrians

Jews and Culture between the World Wars

Author: Lisa Silverman

Publisher: Oxford University Press

ISBN:

Category: History

Page: 346

View: 162

The collapse of Austria-Hungary in 1918 left all Austrians in a state of political, social, and economic turmoil, but Jews in particular found their lives shaken to the core. Although Jews' former comfort zone suddenly disappeared, the dissolution of the Dual Monarchy also created plenty of room for innovation and change in the realm of culture. Jews eagerly took up the challenge to fill this void, and they became heavily invested in culture as a way to shape their new, but also vexed, self-understandings. By isolating the years between the World Wars and examining formative events in both Vienna and the provinces, Becoming Austrians: Jews and Culture between the World Wars demonstrates that an intensified marking of people, places, and events as "Jewish" accompanied the crises occurring in the wake of Austria-Hungary's collapse, with profound effects on Austria's cultural legacy. In some cases, the consequences of this marking resulted in grave injustices. Philipp Halsmann, for example, was wrongfully imprisoned for the murder of his father years before he became a world-famous photographer. And the men who shot and killed writer Hugo Bettauer and philosopher Moritz Schlick received inadequate punishment for their murderous deeds. But engagements with the terms of Jewish difference also characterized the creation of culture, as shown in Hugo Bettauer's satirical novel The City without Jews and its film adaptation, other texts by Veza Canetti, David Vogel, A.M. Fuchs, Vicki Baum, and Mela Hartwig, and performances at the Salzburg Festival and the Yiddish theater in Vienna. By examining the lives, works, and deeds of a broad range of Austrians, Lisa Silverman reveals how the social codings of politics, gender, and nation received a powerful boost when articulated along the lines of Jewish difference.

Best Books