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Reports of the Cambridge Anthropological Expedition to Torres Straits: Volume 1, General Ethnography

Author: A. C. Haddon

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

ISBN:

Category: Social Science

Page: 462

View: 338

The first volume compiles the results of an ethnographical research expedition in the Torres Strait, New Guinea, and Borneo.

Reports of the Cambridge Anthropological Expedition to Torres Straits ...

Author: Alfred Cort Haddon

Publisher: CUP Archive

ISBN:

Category: Art, Torres Strait Island

Page:

View: 840

Reports of the Cambridge Anthropological Expedition to Torres Straits

Author: Alfred Cort Haddon

Publisher: CUP Archive

ISBN:

Category: Ethnology

Page:

View: 732

Reports of the Cambridge Anthropological Expedition

Author:

Publisher: CUP Archive

ISBN:

Category:

Page:

View: 946

Woven Histories, Dancing Lives

Torres Strait Islander Identity, Culture and History

Author: Richard Davis

Publisher: Aboriginal Studies Press

ISBN:

Category: Social Science

Page: 313

View: 967

A collection of essays that communicates the unique histories and cultures of Torres Strait Islanders to a broad audience.

Reports of the Cambridge Anthropological Expedition to Torres Straits: Volume 3, Linguistics

Author: A. C. Haddon

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

ISBN:

Category: Social Science

Page: 546

View: 649

The third in a series compiling the results of an ethnographical research expedition in the Torres Strait, New Guinea, and Borneo. Written entirely by Sidney H. Ray, a prominent member of the expedition and a renowned scholar of Melanesian languages, the text details a variety of the region's languages.

A Companion to Rock Art

Author: Jo McDonald

Publisher: John Wiley & Sons

ISBN:

Category: Social Science

Page: 736

View: 732

This unique guide provides an artistic and archaeological journeydeep into human history, exploring the petroglyphic andpictographic forms of rock art produced by the earliest humans tocontemporary peoples around the world. Summarizes the diversity of views on ancient rock art fromleading international scholars Includes new discoveries and research, illustrated with over160 images (including 30 color plates) from major rock art sitesaround the world Examines key work of noted authorities (e.g. Lewis-Williams,Conkey, Whitley and Clottes), and outlines new directions for rockart research Is broadly international in scope, identifying rock art fromNorth and South America, Australia, the Pacific, Africa, India,Siberia and Europe Represents new approaches in the archaeological study of rockart, exploring issues that include gender, shamanism, landscape,identity, indigeneity, heritage and tourism, as well astechnological and methodological advances in rock art analyses

Strangers in the South Seas

The Idea of the Pacific in Western Thought : an Anthology

Author: Richard Lansdown

Publisher: University of Hawaii Press

ISBN:

Category: Travel

Page: 429

View: 106

Long before Magellan entered the Pacific in 1521 Westerners entertained ideas of undiscovered oceans, mighty continents, and paradisal islands at the far ends of the earth-such ideas would have a long life and a deep impact in both the Pacific and the West. With the discovery of Tahiti in 1767 another powerful myth was added to this collection: the noble savage. For the first time Westerners were confronted by a people who seemed happier than themselves. This revolution in the human sciences was accompanied by one in the natural sciences after Darwin's momentous visit to the Galapagos Islands. The Pacific produced other challenges for nineteenth-century researchers on race and culture, and for those intent on exporting their religions to this immense quarter of the globe. As the century wore on, the region presented opportunities and dilemmas for the imperial powers, a process was accelerated by the Pacific War between 1941 and 1945. Strangers in the South Seas recounts and illustrates this story using a wealth of primary texts. It includes generous excerpts from the work of explorers, soldiers, naturalists, anthropologists, artists, and writers--some famous, some obscure. It shows how "the Great South Sea" has been an irreplaceable "distant mirror" of the West and its intellectual obsessions since the Renaissance.

The Reality of a Dark History

From contact and conflict to cultural recognition of Aboriginals and Torres Strait Islanders

Author: Val Donovan

Publisher: Australian eBook Publisher

ISBN:

Category: History

Page: 325

View: 752

The account of the period of first contact between Traditional Owners and European newcomers, with the resulting warfare and destruction of Indigenous societies through disease and malnutrition, sets in context later Queensland Government decisions. Government responses to the Aboriginal ‘problem’ became a history of legislation and an oppressive regime which controlled ATSI Peoples’ lives until the early 1970s.

The Gift of the Face

Portraiture and Time in Edward S. Curtis's The North American Indian

Author: Shamoon Zamir

Publisher: UNC Press Books

ISBN:

Category: Social Science

Page: 352

View: 523

Edward S. Curtis's The North American Indian is the most ambitious photographic and ethnographic record of Native American cultures ever produced. Published between 1907 and 1930 as a series of twenty volumes and portfolios, the work contains more than two thousand photographs intended to document the traditional culture of every Native American tribe west of the Mississippi. Many critics have claimed that Curtis's images present Native peoples as a "vanishing race," hiding both their engagement with modernity and the history of colonial violence. But in this major reappraisal of Curtis's work, Shamoon Zamir argues instead that Curtis's photography engages meaningfully with the crisis of culture and selfhood brought on by the dramatic transformations of Native societies. This crisis is captured profoundly, and with remarkable empathy, in Curtis's images of the human face. Zamir also contends that we can fully understand this achievement only if we think of Curtis's Native subjects as coauthors of his project. This radical reassessment is presented as a series of close readings that explore the relationship of aesthetics and ethics in photography. Zamir's richly illustrated study resituates Curtis's work in Native American studies and in the histories of photography and visual anthropology.

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