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Sinn Feín

a hundred turbulent years

Author: Brian Feeney

Publisher: Univ of Wisconsin Pr

ISBN:

Category: History

Page: 464

View: 316

Sinn Féin ("ourselves alone") is one of the most controversial political movements in Ireland. Here, for the first time, is the complete story of the rise and fall—and rise again—of a party that repeatedly has reshaped its identity over the course of a hundred years, moving from dual monarchy to dual strategy—the gun and the ballot box. From Arthur Griffith to Gerry Adams, this is a roll-call of major personalities from Irish and British history and politics, including Eamon de Valera, Countess Constance Markievicz, David Lloyd George, Michael Collins, Ruairí Ó Brádaigh, Cathal Goulding, Tomás MacGiolla, Margaret Thatcher, and Martin McGuinness. Now at the beginning of the twenty-first century, Sinn Féin seems poised to play a pivotal role in the Irish political arena, north and south, well into the future. Its place in history is still being written. Copublished with the O’Brien Press, Dublin. The Wisconsin edition is for sale only in North America and the Philippines.

Sinn Féin

A Hundred Turbulent Years

Author: Brian Feeney

Publisher: Virago Press

ISBN:

Category: Political Science

Page: 463

View: 304

Uncompromising and controversial Sinn Fein has survived an extraordinary history in politics and has seen some of the most famous political names in Ireland pass through its ranks. Brian Feeney presents this illustrated history of the party.

New Directions in Irish-American History

Author: Kevin Kenny

Publisher: Univ of Wisconsin Press

ISBN:

Category: History

Page: 334

View: 149

The writing of Irish American history has been transformed since the 1960s. This volume demonstrates how scholars from many disciplines are addressing not only issues of emigration, politics, and social class but also race, labor, gender, representation, historical memory, and return (both literal and symbolic) to Ireland. This recent scholarship embraces Protestants as well as Catholics, incorporates analysis from geography, sociology, and literary criticism, and proposes a genuinely transnational framework giving attention to both sides of the Atlantic. This book combines two special issues of the journal Éire-Ireland with additional new material. The contributors include Tyler Anbinder, Thomas J. Archdeacon, Bruce D. Boling, Maurice J. Bric, Mary P. Corcoran, Mary E. Daly, Catherine M. Eagan, Ruth-Ann M. Harris, Diane M. Hotten-Somers, William Jenkins, Patricia Kelleher, Líam Kennedy, Kerby A. Miller, Harvey O'Brien, Matthew J. O'Brien, Timothy M. O'Neil, and Fionnghuala Sweeney.

Mourning and political culture in Ireland, 1916-1921

toward an understanding of popular support for the war of independence

Author: Ann M. MacLaughlin-Berres

Publisher:

ISBN:

Category:

Page: 210

View: 966

A Brief History of Ireland

Author: Paul F. State

Publisher: Infobase Publishing

ISBN:

Category: History

Page: 408

View: 230

Follows the political, economic, and social development of Ireland from the pagan past to the contemporary religious strife and hope for reconciliation.

Remembering the Year of the French

Irish Folk History and Social Memory

Author: Guy Beiner

Publisher: Univ of Wisconsin Press

ISBN:

Category: History

Page: 488

View: 601

Remembering the Year of the French is a model of historical achievement, moving deftly between the study of historical events—the failed French invasion of the West of Ireland in 1798—and folkloric representationsof those events. Delving into the folk history found in Ireland’s rich oral traditions, Guy Beiner reveals alternate visions of the Irish past and brings into focus the vernacular histories, folk commemorative practices, and negotiations of memory that have gone largely unnoticed by historians. Beiner analyzes hundreds of hitherto unstudied historical, literary, and ethnographic sources. Though his focus is on 1798, his work is also a comprehensive study of Irish folk history and grass-roots social memory in Ireland. Investigating how communities in the West of Ireland remembered, well into the mid-twentieth century, an episode in the late eighteenth century, this is a “history from below” that gives serious attention to the perspectives of those who have been previously ignored or discounted. Beiner brilliantly captures the stories, ceremonies, and other popular traditions through which local communities narrated, remembered, and commemorated the past. Demonstrating the unique value of folklore as a historical source, Remembering the Year of the French offers a fresh perspective on collective memory and modern Irish history. Winner, Wayland Hand Competition for outstanding publication in folklore and history, American Folklore Society Finalist, award for the best book published about or growing out of public history, National Council on Public History Winner, Michaelis-Jena Ratcliff Prize for the best study of folklore or folk life in Great Britain and Ireland “An important and beautifully produced work. Guy Beiner here shows himself to be a historian of unusual talent.”—Marianne Elliott, Times Literary Supplement “Thoroughly researched and scholarly. . . . Beiner’s work is full of empathy and sympathy for the human remains, memorials, and commemorations of past lives and the multiple ways in which they actually continue to live.”—Stiofán Ó Cadhla, Journal of British Studies “A major contribution to Irish historiography.”—Maureen Murphy, Irish Literary Supplement "A remarkable piece of scholarship . . . . Accessible, full of intriguing detail, and eminently teachable.”?—Ray Casman, New Hibernia Review “The most important monograph on Irish history of the nineteenth and twentieth centuries to be published in recent years.”—Matthew Kelly, English Historical Review “A strikingly ambitious work . . . . Elegantly constructed, lucidly written and inspired, and displaying an inexhaustible capacity for research”—Ciarán Brady, History IRELAND “A closely argued, meticulously detailed and rich analysis . . . . providing such innovative treatment of a wide array of sources, his work will resonate with the concerns of many cultural and historical geographers working on social memory in quite different geographical settings and historical contexts.”—Yvonne Whelan, Journal of Historical Geography

Ireland's New Worlds

Immigrants, Politics, and Society in the United States and Australia, 1815–1922

Author: Malcolm Campbell

Publisher: Univ of Wisconsin Press

ISBN:

Category: History

Page: 249

View: 642

In the century between the Napoleonic Wars and the Irish Civil War, more than seven million Irish men and women left their homeland to begin new lives abroad. While the majority settled in the United States, Irish emigrants dispersed across the globe, many of them finding their way to another “New World,” Australia. Ireland’s New Worlds is the first book to compare Irish immigrants in the United States and Australia. In a profound challenge to the national histories that frame most accounts of the Irish diaspora, Malcolm Campbell highlights the ways that economic, social, and cultural conditions shaped distinct experiences for Irish immigrants in each country, and sometimes in different parts of the same country. From differences in the level of hostility that Irish immigrants faced to the contrasting economies of the United States and Australia, Campbell finds that there was much more to the experiences of Irish immigrants than their essential “Irishness.” America’s Irish, for example, were primarily drawn into the population of unskilled laborers congregating in cities, while Australia’s Irish, like their fellow colonialists, were more likely to engage in farming. Campbell shows how local conditions intersected with immigrants’ Irish backgrounds and traditions to create surprisingly varied experiences in Ireland’s new worlds. Outstanding Book, selected by the American Association of School Librarians, and Best Books for Special Interests, selected by the Public Library Association “Well conceived and thoroughly researched . . . . This clearly written, thought-provoking work fulfills the considerable ambitions of comparative migration studies.”—Choice

The Slow Failure

Population Decline and Independent Ireland, 1920–1973

Author: Mary E. Daly

Publisher: University of Wisconsin Pres

ISBN:

Category: History

Page: 454

View: 560

Today Ireland’s population is rising, immigration outpaces emigration, most families have two or at most three children, and full-time farmers are in steady decline. But the opposite was true for more than a century, from the great famine of the 1840s until the 1960s. Between 1922 and 1966—most of the first fifty years after independence—the population of Ireland was falling, in the 1950s as rapidly as in the 1880s. Mary Daly’s The Slow Failure examines not just the reasons for the decline, but the responses to it by politicians, academics, journalists, churchmen, and others who publicly agonized over their nation’s “slow failure.” Eager to reverse population decline but fearful that economic development would undermine Irish national identity, they fashioned statistical evidence to support ultimately fruitless policies to encourage large, rural farm families. Focusing on both Irish government and society, Daly places Ireland’s population history in the mainstream history of independent Ireland. Daly’s research reveals how pastoral visions of an ideal Ireland made it virtually impossible to reverse the fall in population. Promoting large families, for example, contributed to late marriages, actually slowing population growth further. The crucial issue of emigration failed to attract serious government attention except during World War II; successive Irish governments refused to provide welfare services for emigrants, leaving that role to the Catholic Church. Daly takes these and other elements of an often-sad story, weaving them into essential reading for understanding modern Irish history

American Book Publishing Record

Author:

Publisher:

ISBN:

Category: American literature

Page:

View: 881

The eternal Paddy

Irish identity and the British press, 1798-1882

Author: Michael Willem De Nie

Publisher: Univ of Wisconsin Pr

ISBN:

Category: History

Page: 339

View: 214

In The Eternal Paddy, Michael de Nie examines anti-Irish prejudice, Anglo-Irish relations, and the construction of Irish and British identities in nineteenth-century Britain. This book provides a new, more inclusive approach to the study of Irish identity as perceived by Britons and demonstrates that ideas of race were inextricably connected with class concerns and religious prejudice in popular views of both peoples. De Nie suggests that while traditional anti-Irish stereotypes were fundamental to British views of Ireland, equally important were a collection of sympathetic discourses and a self-awareness of British prejudice. In the pages of the British newspaper press, this dialogue created a deep ambivalence about the Irish people, an ambivalence that allowed most Britons to assume that the root of Ireland’s difficulties lay in its Irishness. Drawing on more than ninety newspapers published in England, Scotland, and Wales, The Eternal Paddy offers the first major detailed analysis of British press coverage of Ireland over the course of the nineteenth century. This book traces the evolution of popular understandings and proposed solutions to the "Irish question," focusing particularly on the interrelationship between the press, the public, and the politicians. The work also engages with ongoing studies of imperialism and British identity, exploring the role of Catholic Ireland in British perceptions of their own identity and their empire.

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