Search Results: sorcerers-apprentices-100-years-of-law-clerks-at-the-united-states-supreme-court

Sorcerers' Apprentices

100 Years of Law Clerks at the United States Supreme Court

Author: Artemus Ward,David L Weiden

Publisher: NYU Press

ISBN: 0814794203

Category: Law

Page: 352

View: 6251

"Ward and Weiden have produced that rare book that is both a meticulous piece of scholarship and a good read. The authors have . . . sifted through a varied and voluminous amount of archival material, winnowing out the chaff and leaving the excellent wheat for our consumption. They marry this extensive archival research with original survey data, using both to great effect." --Law and Politics Book Review"Helps illuminate the inner workings of an institution that is still largely shrouded in mystery." --The Wall Street Journal Online"The main quibble . . . with contemporary law clerks is that they wield too much influence over their justices' opinion-writing. Artemus and Weiden broaden this concern to the clerks' influence on the thinking of the justices about how to decide cases." --Slate.comProvides excellent insight into the inner workings of the Supreme Court, how it selects cases for review, what pressures are brought to bear on the justices, and how the final opinions are produced. Recommended for all academic libraries. --Library JournalArtemus Ward and David L. Weiden argue that the clerks have more power than they used to have, and probably more power than they should. --Washington PostThe book contains a wealth of historical information. . . . A reader can learn a lot from this pioneering study. --Cleveland Plain DealerMeticulous in scholarship. . . . Sorcerers' Apprentices presents convincing statistical evidence that the aggregate time that law clerks spend on certiorari memos has fallen considerably because of the reduction in the number of memos written by each clerk. --Judge Richard A. Posner in The New RepublicBased on judicial working papers and extensive interviews, the authors have compiled the most complete picture to dat

Sorcerers' Apprentices

100 Years of Law Clerks at the United States Supreme Court

Author: Artemus Ward,David L Weiden

Publisher: NYU Press

ISBN: 9780814794746

Category: Law

Page: 352

View: 4166

Law clerks have been a permanent fixture in the halls of the United States Supreme Court from its founding, but the relationship between clerks and their justices has generally been cloaked in secrecy. While the role of the justice is both public and formal, particularly in terms of the decisions a justice makes and the power that he or she can wield in the American political system, the clerk has historically operated behind closed doors. Do clerks make actual decisions that they impart to justices, or are they only research assistants that carry out the instructions of the decision makers—the justices? Based on Supreme Court archives, the personal papers of justices and other figures at the Supreme Court, and interviews and written surveys with 150 former clerks, Sorcerers’ Apprentices is a rare behind-the-scenes look at the life of a law clerk, and how it has evolved since its nineteenth-century beginnings. Artemus Ward and David L. Weiden reveal that throughout history, clerks have not only written briefs, but made significant decisions about cases that are often unseen by those outside of justices' chambers. Should clerks have this power, they ask, and, equally important, what does this tell us about the relationship between the Supreme Court’s accountability to and relationship with the American public? Sorcerers’ Apprentices not only sheds light on the little-known role of the clerk but offers provocative suggestions for reforming the institution of the Supreme Court clerk. Anyone that has worked as a law clerk, is considering clerking, or is interested in learning about what happens in the chambers of Supreme Court justices will want to read this engaging and comprehensive examination of how the role of the law clerk has evolved over its long history.

Sorcerers' Apprentices

100 Years of Law Clerks at the United States Supreme Court

Author: Artemus Ward,David L Weiden

Publisher: NYU Press

ISBN: 0814794041

Category: History

Page: 337

View: 8799

Law clerks have been a permanent fixture in the halls of the United States Supreme Court from its founding, but the relationship between clerks and their justices has generally been cloaked in secrecy. While the role of the justice is both public and formal, particularly in terms of the decisions a justice makes and the power that he or she can wield in the American political system, the clerk has historically operated behind closed doors. Do clerks make actual decisions that they impart to justices, or are they only research assistants that carry out the instructions of the decision makers—the justices? Based on Supreme Court archives, the personal papers of justices and other figures at the Supreme Court, and interviews and written surveys with 150 former clerks, Sorcerers’ Apprentices is a rare behind-the-scenes look at the life of a law clerk, and how it has evolved since its nineteenth-century beginnings. Artemus Ward and David L. Weiden reveal that throughout history, clerks have not only written briefs, but made significant decisions about cases that are often unseen by those outside of justices' chambers. Should clerks have this power, they ask, and, equally important, what does this tell us about the relationship between the Supreme Court’s accountability to and relationship with the American public? Sorcerers’ Apprentices not only sheds light on the little-known role of the clerk but offers provocative suggestions for reforming the institution of the Supreme Court clerk. Anyone that has worked as a law clerk, is considering clerking, or is interested in learning about what happens in the chambers of Supreme Court justices will want to read this engaging and comprehensive examination of how the role of the law clerk has evolved over its long history.

Courtiers of the Marble Palace

The Rise and Influence of the Supreme Court Law Clerk

Author: Todd C. Peppers

Publisher: Stanford University Press

ISBN: 9780804753821

Category: Law

Page: 310

View: 3685

Courtiers of the Marble Palace explores how law clerks are hired and utilized by United States Supreme Court justices.

In Chambers

Stories of Supreme Court Law Clerks and Their Justices

Author: Todd C. Peppers

Publisher: University of Virginia Press

ISBN: 0813932653

Category: Biography & Autobiography

Page: 445

View: 2670

Written by former law clerks, legal scholars, biographers, historians, and political scientists, the essays in In Chambers tell the fascinating story of clerking at the Supreme Court. In addition to reflecting the personal experiences of the law clerks with their justices, the essays reveal how clerks are chosen, what tasks are assigned to them, and how the institution of clerking has evolved over time, from the first clerks in the late 1800s to the clerks of Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg and Chief Justice William Rehnquist. In Chambers offers a variety of perspectives on the unique experience of Supreme Court clerks. Former law clerks—including Alan M. Dershowitz, Charles A. Reich, and J. Harvie Wilkinson III—write about their own clerkships, painting vivid and detailed pictures of their relationships with the justices, while other authors write about the various clerkships for a single justice, putting a justice's practice into a broader context. The book also includes essays about the first African American and first woman to hold clerkships. Sharing their insights, anecdotes, and experiences in a clear, accessible style, the contributors provide readers with a rare glimpse into the inner workings of the Supreme Court.

The Supreme Court Sourcebook

Author: Richard H. Seamon,Andrew Siegel

Publisher: Wolters Kluwer Law & Business

ISBN: 145483868X

Category: Law

Page: 800

View: 2592

The Supreme Court Sourcebook provides carefully selected, edited, and analyzed materials on the Court, including academic literature, historical materials, internal court documents, Court filings, and judicial opinions. The flexible organization suits a variety of courses. An online component keeps the book current and interesting, with ready-to-use materials in pending cases for advocacy and opinion-writing simulations. The combined package gives professors a turnkey solution for teaching a theoretical course (examination of the Supreme Court as an institution), a hands-on course (simulations of oral argument and opinion writing in pending cases), or any custom combination in between. All of the authors have significant Supreme Court experience: Seamon served with now Chief Justice John Roberts in the Office of the U.S. Solicitor General, representing the U.S. in cases before the Court; Siegel clerked for Justice John Paul Stevens; Thai clerked for Justice John Paul Stevens and Justice Byron R. White; and Watts clerked for Justice John Paul Stevens. Features: carefully selected, edited, and analyzed materials academic literature historical materials judicial opinions litigation papers internal court documents online component keeps the book current and interesting supplies ready-to-use packages of materials uses pending cases for advocacy and opinion-writing simulations flexible organization provides a turnkey solution for a variety of courses a theoretical course (examination of the Supreme Court as an institution) a hands-on course (simulations of oral argument and opinion writing in pending cases) any custom combination vast author experience working for and appearing before the Supreme Court Seamon served with now Chief Justice John Roberts in the Office of the U.S. Solicitor General, representing the U.S. in cases before the Court Siegel clerked for Justice John Paul Stevens Thai clerked for Justice John Paul Stevens and Justice Byron R. White Watts clerked for Justice John Paul Stevens

In Chambers

Stories of Supreme Court Law Clerks and Their Justices

Author: Todd C. Peppers,Artemus Ward

Publisher: University of Virginia Press

ISBN: 0813932661

Category: Law

Page: 472

View: 2462

Written by former law clerks, legal scholars, biographers, historians, and political scientists, the essays in In Chambers tell the fascinating story of clerking at the Supreme Court. In addition to reflecting the personal experiences of the law clerks with their justices, the essays reveal how clerks are chosen, what tasks are assigned to them, and how the institution of clerking has evolved over time, from the first clerks in the late 1800s to the clerks of Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg and Chief Justice William Rehnquist. In Chambers offers a variety of perspectives on the unique experience of Supreme Court clerks. Former law clerks—including Alan M. Dershowitz, Charles A. Reich, and J. Harvie Wilkinson III—write about their own clerkships, painting vivid and detailed pictures of their relationships with the justices, while other authors write about the various clerkships for a single justice, putting a justice's practice into a broader context. The book also includes essays about the first African American and first woman to hold clerkships. Sharing their insights, anecdotes, and experiences in a clear, accessible style, the contributors provide readers with a rare glimpse into the inner workings of the Supreme Court.

Of Courtiers and Kings

More Stories of Supreme Court Law Clerks and Their Justices

Author: Clare Cushman,Todd C. Peppers

Publisher: University of Virginia Press

ISBN: 0813937272

Category: Law

Page: 448

View: 2854

Supreme Court justices have long relied on law clerks to help process the work of the Court. Yet few outside the Court are privy to the behind-the-scenes bonds that form between justices and their clerks. In Of Courtiers and Kings, Todd C. Peppers and Clare Cushman offer an intimate new look at the personal and professional relationships of law clerks with their justices. Going beyond the book’s widely acclaimed predecessor, I n Chambers, the vignettes collected here range from reflections on how serving as clerks at the Supreme Court impacted the careers of such justices as Stephen Breyer, Elena Kagan, William Rehnquist, John G. Roberts Jr., and John Paul Stevens to personal recollections written by parents and children who have both served as Supreme Court clerks. While individual essays often focus on a single justice and his or her corps of clerks—including how that justice selected and utilized the clerks—taken as a whole the volume provides a macro-level view of the evolution of the role of the Supreme Court law clerk. Drawing on a rich repository of such anecdotes, insights, and experience, the volume relates in a clear and accessible style how the clerking function has changed over time and what it is like for law clerks to be witnesses to history. Offering a rare glimpse into a normally unseen world, Of Courtiers and Kings reveals the Court’s increasing reliance on law clerks and raises important questions about the selection, utilization, and influence of law clerks. Praise for In Chambers: "An excellent book.... It's interesting for many different reasons, not the least of which as a reminder of how much of a bastion of elitism the Court has always been."—Atlantic Monthly "The best parts of the book are the behind-the-scenes descriptions of life at the court.... [A]n impressive and comprehensive book."—Associated Press

Final Judgment

The Last Law Lords and the Supreme Court

Author: Alan Paterson

Publisher: Bloomsbury Publishing

ISBN: 1782252789

Category: Law

Page: 366

View: 6984

The House of Lords, for over 300 years the UK's highest court, was transformed in 2009 into the UK Supreme Court. This book provides a compelling and unrivalled view into the workings of the Court during its final decade, and into the formative years of the Supreme Court. Drawing on over 100 interviews, including more than 40 with Law Lords and Justices, and uniquely, some of their judicial notebooks, this is a landmark study of appellate judging 'from the inside' by an author whose earlier work on the House of Lords has provided a scholarly benchmark for over 30 years. The book demonstrates that appellate decision-making in the UK's final court remains a social and collective process, primarily because of the dialogues which take place between the judges and the key groups with which they interact when reaching their decisions. As the book shows, the forms of dialogue are now more varied, yet the most significant dialogues continue to be with their fellow Law Lords and Justices, and with counsel. To these, new dialogues have been added, namely those with foreign courts (especially Strasbourg) and with judicial assistants, which have subtly altered the tenor and import of their other dialogues. The research reveals that, unlike the English Court of Appeal, the House of Lords in its last decade was only intermittently collegial since Lord Bingham's philosophy of appellate judging left opinion writing, concurrences and dissents largely to individual preference. In the Supreme Court, however, there has been a marked shift to team working and collective decision-making bringing with it challenges and occasional tensions not seen in the final years of the House of Lords. The work shows that effectiveness in group-decision making in the final court turns in part on the stages when dialogues occur, in part on the geography of the court and in part on the task leadership and social leadership skills of the judges involved in particular cases. The passing of the Human Rights Act and the expansion in judicial review over the last 30 years have dramatically altered the two remaining dialogues - those with Parliament and with the Executive. With the former, the dialogue has grown more distant, with the latter, more problematic, than was the case 40 years ago. The last chapter rehearses where the changing dialogues have left the UK's final court. Ironically, despite the oft applauded commitment of the new Court to public visibility, the book concludes that even greater transparency in the dialogue with the public may be required. 'The way appellate judges at the highest level behave to each other, to counsel, with other branches of government and with other courts is brought under closer scrutiny in this book than ever before...The remarkable width and depth of his examination...has resulted in a work of real scholarship, which all those who are interested in how appellate courts work all over the common law world will find especially valuable.' From the foreword by Lord Hope of Craighead KT 'Alan Paterson's knowledge and interest in the Supreme Court, coupled with his expertise as a lawyer who understands the legal system and the judicial process, make him a perfect chronicler and assessor of what the Court's role is and what it should be, and how it functions and how it might improve.' Lord Neuberger, President of the Supreme Court

Mighty Judgment

How The Supreme Court Of Canada Runs Your Life

Author: Philip Slayton

Publisher: Penguin Canada

ISBN: 0143180517

Category: Political Science

Page: 368

View: 5863

In Mighty Judgment Philip Slayton describes the important issues the Supreme Court decides for individual Canadians and for Canada as a nation, and the surprising and dramatic ways in which these decisions shape our future. In the Morgentaler case (1988), the court struck down laws restricting abortion, leaving Canada the only Western country without any abortion laws. In the Same-Sex Marriage Reference (2004), it decided that gays and lesbians could marry. In the Secession Reference (1998), it laid down the conditions under which Quebec could secede from Canada. In the Patrick case (2009), the court decided that the right of privacy does not stop the police from rifling through our garbage. More recently, the court administered a tongue-lashing to the federal government over its treatment of Canadian youth Omar Khadr, accused by the United States government of fighting with the Taliban. Mighty Judgment makes clear that the Supreme Court of Canada is a political institution, and that judges are politicians. But unlike other politicians, judges cannot be voted out of office. Slayton discusses reforms that will be needed, particularly in the way judges are chosen, once we recognize that the court decides policy and plays a pivotal role in governing Canada.

The Brethren

Inside the Supreme Court

Author: Bob Woodward,Scott Armstrong

Publisher: Simon and Schuster

ISBN: 1439126348

Category: Political Science

Page: 592

View: 3736

The Brethren is the first detailed behind-the-scenes account of the Supreme Court in action. Bob Woodward and Scott Armstrong have pierced its secrecy to give us an unprecedented view of the Chief and Associate Justices—maneuvering, arguing, politicking, compromising, and making decisions that affect every major area of American life.

Supreme Court Justice Tom C. Clark

A Life of Service

Author: Mimi Clark Gronlund

Publisher: University of Texas Press

ISBN: 0292779143

Category: Biography & Autobiography

Page: 352

View: 3528

An associate justice on the renowned Warren Court whose landmark ruling in Brown v. Board of Education overturned racial segregation in schools and other public facilities, Tom C. Clark was a crusader for justice throughout his long legal career. Among many tributes Clark received, Supreme Court Chief Justice Warren Burger opined that "no man in the past thirty years has contributed more to the improvement of justice than Tom Clark." Supreme Court Justice Tom C. Clark is the first biography of this important American jurist. Written by his daughter, Mimi Clark Gronlund, and based on interviews with many of Clark's judicial associates, friends, and family, as well as archival research, it offers a well-rounded portrait of a lawyer and judge who dealt with issues that remain in contention today—civil rights, the rights of the accused, school prayer, and censorship/pornography, among them. Gronlund explores the factors in her father's upbringing and education that helped form his judicial philosophy, then describes how that philosophy shaped his decisions on key issues and cases, including the internment of Japanese Americans during World War II, the investigation of war fraud, the Truman administration's loyalty program (an anti-communist effort), the Brown decision, Mapp v. Ohio (protections against unreasonable search and seizure), and Abington v. Schempp (which overturned a state law that required reading from the Bible each day in public schools).

Thurgood Marshall

Race, Rights, and the Struggle for a More Perfect Union

Author: Charles L. Zelden

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 1136174958

Category: History

Page: 232

View: 5903

Thurgood Marshall was an Associate Justice of the US Supreme Court from 1967 to 1991. He was the first African American to hold that position, and was one of the most influential legal actors of his time. Before being appointed to the Supreme Court by President Lyndon Johnson, Marshall was a lawyer for the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People (NAACP), Federal Judge (1961-1965), and Solicitor General of the United States (1965-1966). Marshall won twenty-nine of thirty-two cases before the Supreme Court – most notably the landmark case of Brown v. Board of Education, which held segregated public schools unconstitutional. Marshall spent his career fighting racial segregation and legal inequality, and his time on the court establishing a record for supporting the "voiceless American." He left a legacy of change that still affects American society today. Through this concise biography, accompanied by primary sources that present Marshall in his own words, students will learn what Marshall did (and did not do) during his life, why those actions were important, and what effects his efforts had on the larger course of American history.

Closed chambers

the rise, fall, and future of the modern Supreme Court

Author: Edward Lazarus

Publisher: Penguin Group USA

ISBN: N.A

Category: History

Page: 598

View: 8471

A former Supreme Court clerk reveals the judicial institution's inner workings and decision making processes, offering a detailed portrait of justice corrupted by politics and unduly influenced by the power of personality.

Popular Justice

Presidential Prestige and Executive Success in the Supreme Court

Author: Jeff Yates

Publisher: SUNY Press

ISBN: 0791488276

Category: Political Science

Page: 131

View: 8958

Explores the interaction between the presidency and the U.S. Supreme Court.

Law clerks, support personnel, and the decline of consensual norms on the United States Supreme Court, 1935-1995

Author: Bradley J. Best

Publisher: Lfb Scholarly Pub Llc

ISBN: 9781931202350

Category: Law

Page: 278

View: 3317

American constitutional interpretation

Author: Walter F. Murphy,James E. Fleming,Sotirios A. Barber

Publisher: Foundation Pr

ISBN: N.A

Category: Law

Page: 1749

View: 743

This undergaduate text uses original essays, cases and materials to study the very enterprise by which a constitution is interpreted and a constitutional government created. It explores the American polity as both a constitutional and democratic entity. This volume is organized around a set of basic interrogatives: What is the constitution that is to be interpreted? Who are its authoritative interpreters? How do they go about their interpretive tasks?

Death Penalty on Trial

A Handbook with Cases, Laws, and Documents

Author: Gary P. Gershman

Publisher: ABC-CLIO

ISBN: 185109606X

Category: Law

Page: 265

View: 1209

An extensive survey of the pros and cons, evolution, and current issues surrounding one of the hottest topics in today's social debates.

Federal practice and procedure

Author: Charles Alan Wright,Arthur Raphael Miller,Mary Kay Kane

Publisher: N.A

ISBN: N.A

Category: Civil procedure

Page: N.A

View: 3280

The Supreme Court, 9th Edition

Author: Lawrence Baum

Publisher: CQ Press

ISBN: 9781933116853

Category: Political Science

Page: 230

View: 8297

While the Court is always evolving, the changes have been especially sweeping these past few years. Looking closely at the appointments of two new justices and the possible effects of the shift from the Rehnquist Court to the Roberts Court, Baum examines the implications of recent major decisions. Baum explores the Court's rulings on the procedural rights of suspected terrorists as well as the growth in conflict between Congress and the federal courts. --from publisher description

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