Search Results: southern-history

The Burden of Southern History

The Emergence of a Modern University, 1945--1980

Author: C. Vann Woodward

Publisher: LSU Press

ISBN: 0807149489

Category: History

Page: 336

View: 4643

C. Vann Woodward's The Burden of Southern History remains one of the essential history texts of our time. In it Woodward brilliantly addresses the interrelated themes of southern identity, southern distinctiveness, and the strains of irony that characterize much of the South's historical experience. First published in 1960, the book quickly became a touchstone for generations of students. This updated third edition contains a chapter, "Look Away, Look Away," in which Woodward finds a plethora of additional ironies in the South's experience. It also includes previously uncollected appreciations of Robert Penn Warren, to whom the book was originally dedicated, and William Faulkner. This edition also features a new foreword by historian William E. Leuchtenburg in which he recounts the events that led up to Woodward's writing The Burden of Southern History, and reflects on the book's -- and Woodward's -- place in the study of southern history. The Burden of Southern History is quintessential Woodward -- wise, witty, ruminative, daring, and as alive in the twenty-first century as when it was written.

Shapers of Southern History

Autobiographical Reflections

Author: John B. Boles

Publisher: University of Georgia Press

ISBN: 9780820324746

Category: History

Page: 334

View: 6720

This volume gathers personal recollections by fifteen eminent historians of the American South. Coming from distinctive backgrounds, traveling diverse career paths, and practicing different kinds of history, the contributors exemplify the field's richness on many levels. As they reflect on why they joined the profession and chose their particular research specialties, these historians write eloquently of family and upbringing, teachers and mentors, defining events and serendipitous opportunities. The struggle for civil rights was the defining experience for several contributors. Peter H. Wood remembers how black fans of the St. Louis Cardinals erupted in applause for the Dodgers' Jackie Robinson. "I realized for the first time," writes Wood, "that there must be something even bigger than hometown loyalties dividing Americans." Gender equality is another frequent concern in the essays. Anne Firor Scott tells of her advisor's ridicule when childbirth twice delayed Scott's dissertation: "With great effort I managed to write two chapters, but Professor Handlin was moved to inquire whether I planned to have a baby every chapter." Yet another prominent theme is the reconciliation of the professional and the personal, as when Bill C. Malone traces his scholarly interests back to "the memories of growing up poor on an East Texas cotton farm and finding escape and diversion in the sounds of hillbilly music." Always candid and often witty, each essay is a road map through the intellectual terrain of southern history as practiced during the last half of the twentieth century.

What Caused the Civil War?: Reflections on the South and Southern History

Author: Edward L. Ayers

Publisher: W. W. Norton & Company

ISBN: 0393285154

Category: History

Page: 224

View: 9219

“An extremely good writer, [Ayers] is well worth reading . . . on the South and Southern history.”—Stephen Sears, Boston Globe The Southern past has proven to be fertile ground for great works of history. Peculiarities of tragic proportions—a system of slavery flourishing in a land of freedom, secession and Civil War tearing at a federal Union, deep poverty persisting in a nation of fast-paced development—have fed the imaginations of some of our most accomplished historians. Foremost in their ranks today is Edward L. Ayers, author of the award-winning and ongoing study of the Civil War in the heart of America, the Valley of the Shadow Project. In wide-ranging essays on the Civil War, the New South, and the twentieth-century South, Ayers turns over the rich soil of Southern life to explore the sources of the nation's and his own history. The title essay, original here, distills his vast research and offers a fresh perspective on the nation's central historical event.

William Faulkner and Southern History

Author: Joel Williamson

Publisher: Oxford University Press

ISBN: 9780195356403

Category: History

Page: 544

View: 9719

One of America's great novelists, William Faulkner was a writer deeply rooted in the American South. In works such as The Sound and the Fury, As I Lay Dying, Light in August, and Absalom, Absalom! Faulkner drew powerfully on Southern themes, attitudes, and atmosphere to create his own world and place--the mythical Yoknapatawpha County--peopled with quintessential Southerners such as the Compsons, Sartorises, Snopes, and McCaslins. Indeed, to a degree perhaps unmatched by any other major twentieth-century novelist, Faulkner remained at home and explored his own region--the history and culture and people of the South. Now, in William Faulkner and Southern History, one of America's most acclaimed historians of the South, Joel Williamson, weaves together a perceptive biography of Faulkner himself, an astute analysis of his works, and a revealing history of Faulkner's ancestors in Mississippi--a family history that becomes, in Williamson's skilled hands, a vivid portrait of Southern culture itself. Williamson provides an insightful look at Faulkner's ancestors, a group sketch so brilliant that the family comes alive almost as vividly as in Faulkner's own fiction. Indeed, his ancestors often outstrip his characters in their colorful and bizarre nature. Williamson has made several discoveries: the Falkners (William was the first to spell it "Faulkner") were not planter, slaveholding "aristocrats"; Confederate Colonel Falkner was not an unalloyed hero, and he probably sired, protected, and educated a mulatto daughter who married into America's mulatto elite; Faulkner's maternal grandfather Charlie Butler stole the town's money and disappeared in the winter of 1887-1888, never to return. Equally important, Williamson uses these stories to underscore themes of race, class, economics, politics, religion, sex and violence, idealism and Romanticism--"the rainbow of elements in human culture"--that reappear in Faulkner's work. He also shows that, while Faulkner's ancestors were no ordinary people, and while he sometimes flashed a curious pride in them, Faulkner came to embrace a pervasive sense of shame concerning both his family and his culture. This he wove into his writing, especially about sex, race, class, and violence, psychic and otherwise. William Faulkner and Southern History represents an unprecedented publishing event--an eminent historian writing on a major literary figure. By revealing the deep history behind the art of the South's most celebrated writer, Williamson evokes new insights and deeper understanding, providing anyone familiar with Faulkner's great novels with a host of connections between his work, his life, and his ancestry.

Manners and Southern History

Author: Ted Ownby

Publisher: Univ. Press of Mississippi

ISBN: 9781604736410

Category: Reference

Page: 169

View: 5012

The concept of southern manners may evoke images of debutantes being introduced to provincial society or it might conjure thoughts of the humiliating behavior white supremacists expected of African Americans under Jim Crow. The essays in Manners and Southern History analyze these topics and more. Scholars here investigate the myriad ways in which southerners from the Civil War through the civil rights movement understood manners. Contributors write about race, gender, power, and change. Essays analyze the ways southern white women worried about how to manage anger during the Civil War, the complexities of trying to enforce certain codes of behavior under segregation, and the controversy of college women's dating lives in the raucous 1920s. Writers study the background and meaning of Mardi Gras parades and debutante balls, the selective enforcement of antimiscegenation laws, and arguments over the form that opposition to desegregation should take. Concluding essays by Jane Dailey and John F. Kasson summarize and critique the other articles and offer a broader picture of the role that manners played in the social history of the South. Essays by Catherine Clinton, Joseph Crespino, Jane Dailey, Lisa Lindquist Dorr, Anya Jabour, John F. Kasson, Jennifer Ritterhouse, and Charles F. Robinson II Ted Ownby teaches history and southern studies at the University of Mississippi.

Slavery, Secession, and Southern History

Author: Robert L. Paquette,Lou Ferleger

Publisher: University of Virginia Press

ISBN: 9780813919522

Category: History

Page: 229

View: 1639

Presents essays that examine the philosophical and socioeconomic issues of slavery, such as the impact that slavery had on secession, the nature of relations between master and slave, and the effect the Civil War had on race relations.

Southern History Across the Color Line

Author: Nell Irvin Painter

Publisher: UNC Press Books

ISBN: 9780807853603

Category: History

Page: 247

View: 2848

This work reaches across the colour line to examine how race, gender, class and individual subjectivity shaped the lives of black and white women in the 19th- and 20th-century American South.

The South's New Racial Politics

Inside the Race Game of Southern History

Author: Glen Browder

Publisher: NewSouth Books

ISBN: 9781603062275

Category: Political Science

Page: N.A

View: 7596

The South’s New Racial Politics presents an original thesis about how blacks and whites in today’s South engage in a politics that is qualitatively different from the past. Glen Browder—as practitioner and scholar—argues that politicians of the two races now practice an open, sophisticated, biracial game that, arguably, means progress; but it also can bring out old-fashioned, cynical, and racist Southern ways. The lesson to be learned from this interpretative analysis is that the Southern political system, while still constrained by racial problems, is more functional than ever before. Southerners perhaps can now move forward in dealing with their legacy of hard history.

In the Shadow of Statues

A White Southerner Confronts History

Author: Mitch Landrieu

Publisher: Penguin

ISBN: 0525559442

Category: Biography & Autobiography

Page: 227

View: 1833

'There is a difference between remembrance of history and reverence for it.' When Mitch Landrieu addressed the people of New Orleans in May 2017 about his decision to take down four Confederate monuments, including the statue of Robert E. Lee, he struck a nerve nationally, and his speech has now been heard or seen by millions across the country. In his first book, Mayor Landrieu discusses his personal journey on race as well as the path he took to making the decision to remove the monuments, tackles the broader history of slavery, race and institutional inequities that still bedevil America, and traces his personal relationship to this history. His father, as state senator and mayor, was a huge force in the integration of New Orleans in the 1960s and 19070s. Landrieu grew up with a progressive education in one of the nation's most racially divided cities, but even he had to relearn Southern history as it really happened. Equal parts unblinking memoir, history, and prescription for fin

Men Like That

A Southern Queer History

Author: John Howard

Publisher: University of Chicago Press

ISBN: 9780226354705

Category: Fiction

Page: 395

View: 6616

Challenging the idea that gay life can only flourish in urban areas, the author combs the rural South for evidence that homosexuality has found a place in those communities, despite sometimes blatant persecution. Reprint.

Still Fighting the Civil War

The American South and Southern History

Author: David Goldfield

Publisher: LSU Press

ISBN: 080715217X

Category: History

Page: 400

View: 7773

"This is a probing book about the hold of the past, experienced largely as heritage and memory and not as historical understanding, on a whole region and people. Goldfield treats the Lost Cause with unblinking directness.... its main strength: the stress on the weight of memory and its enduring links to white supremacy." -- David W. Blight, Southern Cultures "Drawing on a wide range of sources as well as contemporary reporting, this deftly written historical analysis takes on a difficult topic with passion, sensitivity, and integrity." -- Publishers Weekly In the updated edition of his sweeping narrative on southern history, David Goldfield brings this extensive study into the present with a timely assessment of the unresolved issues surrounding the Civil War's sesquicentennial commemoration. Traversing a hundred and fifty years of memory, Goldfield confronts the remnants of the American Civil War that survive in the hearts of many of the South's residents and in the national news headlines of battle flags, racial injustice, and religious conflicts. Goldfield candidly discusses how and why white southern men fashioned the myths of the Lost Cause and Redemption out of the Civil War and Reconstruction, and how they shaped a religion to canonize the heroes and deify the events of those fateful years. He also recounts how groups of blacks and white women eventually crafted a different, more inclusive version of southern history and how that new vision competed with more traditional perspectives. The battle for southern history, and for the South, continues -- in museums, public spaces, books, state legislatures, and the minds of southerners. Given the region's growing economic power and political influence, understanding this struggle takes on national significance. Through an analysis of ideas of history and memory, religion, race, and gender, Still Fighting the Civil War provides us with a better understanding of the South and one another.

Destination Dixie

Tourism and Southern History

Author: Karen L. Cox

Publisher: N.A

ISBN: 9780813042374

Category: Business & Economics

Page: 315

View: 6999

An exploration of tourist locales that have been restored or adapted to preserve some aspect of the history of the American South.

Southern Food

Author: John Egerton

Publisher: Knopf

ISBN: 0307834565

Category: Cooking

Page: 408

View: 5611

This lively, handsomely illustrated, first-of-its-kind book celebrates the food of the American South in all its glorious variety—yesterday, today, at home, on the road, in history. It brings us the story of Southern cooking; a guide for more than 200 restaurants in eleven Southern states; a compilation of more than 150 time-honored Southern foods; a wonderfully useful annotated bibliography of more than 250 Southern cookbooks; and a collection of more than 200 opinionated, funny, nostalgic, or mouth-watering short selections (from George Washington Carver on sweet potatoes to Flannery O’Connor on collard greens). Here, in sum, is the flavor and feel of what it has meant for Southerners, over the generations, to gather at the table—in a book that’s for reading, for cooking, for eating (in or out), for referring to, for browsing in, and, above all, for enjoying.

History of the Southern Confederacy

Author: Clement Eaton

Publisher: Simon and Schuster

ISBN: 0029087104

Category: History

Page: 349

View: 9890

A study of the social, political, and military history of the Confederacy, looking at how the morale of the people and the army affected the outcome of the war, analyzing the operation of the Confederate government, and delineating the changes which occurred in the society of the Old South under the impact of the war.

Shared Traditions

Southern History and Folk Culture

Author: Charles W. Joyner

Publisher: University of Illinois Press

ISBN: 9780252067723

Category: History

Page: 361

View: 4809

Ranging from rites of power and resistance on the slave plantation to the creolization of language to the musical brew of blues, country, jazz, and rock, Shared Traditions reveals the distinctive culture born of a sharing by black and white southerners of their deep-rooted and diverse traditions.

Jewish Roots in Southern Soil

A New History

Author: Marcie Cohen Ferris,Mark I. Greenberg

Publisher: UPNE

ISBN: 9781584655893

Category: History

Page: 368

View: 968

A lively look at southern Jewish history and culture.

The Journal of Southern History

Author: Wendell Holmes Stephenson

Publisher: N.A

ISBN: N.A

Category: Southern States

Page: N.A

View: 846

Includes section "Book reviews."

Away Down South

A History of Southern Identity

Author: James C. Cobb

Publisher: Oxford University Press

ISBN: 0195315812

Category: History

Page: 404

View: 4125

From the seventeenth century Cavaliers and Uncle Tom's Cabin to Civil Rights museums and today's conflicts over the Confederate flag, here is a brilliant portrait of southern identity, served in an engaging blend of history, literature, and popular culture. In this insightful book, written with dry wit and sharp insight, James C. Cobb explains how the South first came to be seen--and then came to see itself--as a region apart from the rest of America. As Cobb demonstrates, the legend of the aristocratic Cavalier origins of southern planter society was nurtured by both northern and southern writers, only to be challenged by abolitionist critics, black and white. After the Civil War, defeated and embittered southern whites incorporated the Cavalier myth into the cult of the "Lost Cause," which supplied the emotional energy for their determined crusade to rejoin the Union on their own terms. After World War I, white writers like Ellen Glasgow, William Faulkner and other key figures of "Southern Renaissance" as well as their African American counterparts in the "Harlem Renaissance"--Cobb is the first to show the strong links between the two movements--challenged the New South creed by asking how the grandiose vision of the South's past could be reconciled with the dismal reality of its present. The Southern self-image underwent another sea change in the wake of the Civil Rights movement, when the end of white supremacy shook the old definition of the "Southern way of life"--but at the same time, African Americans began to examine their southern roots more openly and embrace their regional, as well as racial, identity. As the millennium turned, the South confronted a new identity crisis brought on by global homogenization: if Southern culture is everywhere, has the New South become the No South? Here then is a major work by one of America's finest Southern historians, a magisterial synthesis that combines rich scholarship with provocative new insights into what the South means to southerners and to America as well.

Myth and Southern History: The Old South

Author: Patrick Gerster,Nicholas Cords

Publisher: University of Illinois Press

ISBN: 9780252060243

Category: History

Page: 224

View: 1002

Publications of the Southern History Association ...

Author: Southern History Association

Publisher: N.A

ISBN: N.A

Category: Southern States

Page: N.A

View: 1397

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