Search Results: taverns-and-drinking-in-early-america

Taverns and Drinking in Early America

Author: Sharon V. Salinger

Publisher: JHU Press

ISBN: 9780801878992

Category: History

Page: 309

View: 7608

"Offers a fresh perspective on one of the colonial period's most important social institutions and the drinking behavior that was central to it... Salinger's work is compelling throughout... A significant and satisfying book." -- American Historical Review

Taverns and drinking in early America

Author: Sharon Vineberg Salinger

Publisher: Johns Hopkins Univ Pr

ISBN: N.A

Category: Cooking

Page: 309

View: 2076

"Offers a fresh perspective on one of the colonial period's most important social institutions and the drinking behavior that was central to it... Salinger's work is compelling throughout... A significant and satisfying book." -- American Historical Review

Every Home a Distillery

Alcohol, Gender, and Technology in the Colonial Chesapeake

Author: Sarah H. Meacham

Publisher: JHU Press

ISBN: 0801897912

Category: History

Page: 208

View: 2725

American historians will find this study both enlightening and surprising.

Rum Punch and Revolution

Taverngoing and Public Life in Eighteenth-Century Philadelphia

Author: Peter Thompson

Publisher: University of Pennsylvania Press

ISBN: 081220428X

Category: History

Page: 296

View: 3754

'Twas Honest old Noah first planted the Vine And mended his morals by drinking its Wine. —from a drinking song by Benjamin Franklin There were, Peter Thompson notes, some one hundred and fifty synonyms for inebriation in common use in colonial Philadelphia and, on the eve of the Revolution, just as many licensed drinking establishments. Clearly, eighteenth-century Philadelphians were drawn to the tavern. In addition to the obvious lure of the liquor, taverns offered overnight accommodations, meals, and stabling for visitors. They also served as places to gossip, gamble, find work, make trades, and gather news. In Rum Punch and Revolution, Thompson shows how the public houses provided a setting in which Philadelphians from all walks of life revealed their characters and ideas as nowhere else. He takes the reader into the cramped confines of the colonial bar room, describing the friendships, misunderstandings and conflicts which were generated among the city's drinkers and investigates the profitability of running a tavern in a city which, until independence, set maximum prices on the cost of drinks and services in its public houses. Taverngoing, Thompson writes, fostered a sense of citizenship that influenced political debate in colonial Philadelphia and became an issue in the city's revolution. Opinionated and profoundly undeferential, taverngoers did more than drink; they forced their political leaders to consider whether and how public opinion could be represented in the counsels of a newly independent nation.

Taverns of the American Revolution

Author: Adrian Covert

Publisher: Insight Editions

ISBN: 9781608877850

Category: History

Page: 192

View: 2145

The first visual and narrative account of the American Revolution told through tales about the Colonial-era inns, taverns, and alcoholic beverages that shaped it, Taverns of the American Revolution is equal parts history, trivia, coffee-table book, and travel guide. A Complete Guide to the Spirits of 1776 In 1737, Benjamin Franklin published “The Drinker’s Dictionary,” a compendium of more than two hundred expressions for drinking and drunkenness, such as “oil’d,” “fuzl’d,” and “half way to Concord.” Nearly forty years later, the same barrooms that fostered these terms over bowls of rum punch helped sow the seeds of revolution. Taverns of the American Revolution presents the boozing and schmoozing that went on in some of America’s most historic watering holes, revealing the crucial role these public houses played as meeting places for George Washington, Thomas Jefferson, Benjamin Franklin, and their fellow Founding Fathers in the struggle for independence. More than a retelling of the Revolutionary War, this unique volume takes readers on a tour of more than twenty surviving colonial taverns; features period artwork, maps, and cocktail recipes; and is filled with trivia and anecdotes about the drinking habits of colonial Americans. From history buffs and those interested in colonial architecture and art to tavern goers, beer aficionados, trivia lovers, and those keen on hitting a few historic pubs on their road trip through the original thirteen colonies, this one-of-a-kind compendium is the ultimate guide to the taverns that helped spark a revolution. Includes: -Commentary on more than twenty surviving colonial taverns Period artwork, maps, and documents -A detailed time line of the events leading up to, during, and immediately after the American Revolution -Six colonial cocktail recipes -A comprehensive index of more than one hundred fifty surviving colonial taverns -An abundance of little-known facts and anecdotes that will have you owning your next pub quiz trivia night

Deadly Medicine

Indians and Alcohol in Early America

Author: Peter C. Mancall

Publisher: Cornell University Press

ISBN: 9780801480447

Category: Social Science

Page: 268

View: 6289

Alcohol abuse has killed and impoverished American Indians since the seventeenth century, when European settlers began trading rum for furs. In the first book to probe the origins of this ongoing social crisis, Peter C. Mancall explores the liquor trade's devastating impact on the Indian communities of colonial America. The author follows the trail of rum from the West Indian producers to the colonial distributors and on to the Indian consumers in the eastern woodlands. To discover why Indians participated in the trade and why they experienced such a powerful desire for alcohol, he addresses current medical views on alcoholism and reexamines the colonial era as a time when Indians were forming new strategies for survival in a world that had been radically changed. Finally, Mancall compares Indian drinking in New France and New Spain with that in the British colonies. Forever shattering the stereotype of the drunken Indian, Mancall offers a powerful indictment of English participation in the liquor trade and a new awareness of the trade's tragic cost for the American Indians.

Drinking in America

Our Secret History

Author: Susan Cheever

Publisher: Twelve

ISBN: 1455513865

Category: History

Page: 240

View: 528

In DRINKING IN AMERICA, bestselling author Susan Cheever chronicles our national love affair with liquor, taking a long, thoughtful look at the way alcohol has changed our nation's history. This is the often-overlooked story of how alcohol has shaped American events and the American character from the seventeenth to the twentieth century. Seen through the lens of alcoholism, American history takes on a vibrancy and a tragedy missing from many earlier accounts. From the drunkenness of the Pilgrims to Prohibition hijinks, drinking has always been a cherished American custom: a way to celebrate and a way to grieve and a way to take the edge off. At many pivotal points in our history-the illegal Mayflower landing at Cape Cod, the enslavement of African Americans, the McCarthy witch hunts, and the Kennedy assassination, to name only a few-alcohol has acted as a catalyst. Some nations drink more than we do, some drink less, but no other nation has been the drunkest in the world as America was in the 1830s only to outlaw drinking entirely a hundred years later. Both a lively history and an unflinching cultural investigation, DRINKING IN AMERICA unveils the volatile ambivalence within one nation's tumultuous affair with alcohol.

In Public Houses

Drink & the Revolution of Authority in Colonial Massachusetts

Author: David W. Conroy

Publisher: UNC Press Books

ISBN: 9780807845219

Category: History

Page: 351

View: 9838

In this study of the role of taverns in the development of Massachusetts society, David Conroy brings into focus a vital and controversial but little-understood facet of public life during the colonial era. Concentrating on the Boston area, he reveals a popular culture at odds with Puritan social ideals, one that contributed to the transformation of Massachusetts into a republican society. Public houses were an integral part of colonial community life and hosted a variety of official functions, including meetings of the courts. They also filled a special economic niche for women and the poor, many of whom turned to tavern-keeping to earn a living. But taverns were also the subject of much critical commentary by the clergy and increasingly restrictive regulations. Conroy argues that these regulations were not only aimed at curbing the spiritual corruption associated with public houses but also at restricting the popular culture that had begun to undermine the colony's social and political hierarchy. Specifically, Conroy illuminates the role played by public houses as a forum for the development of a vocal republican citizenry, and he highlights the connections between the vibrant oral culture of taverns and the expanding print culture of newspapers and political pamphlets in the eighteenth century.

America Walks into a Bar

A Spirited History of Taverns and Saloons, Speakeasies and Grog Shops

Author: Christine Sismondo

Publisher: Oxford University Press

ISBN: 9780199752935

Category: History

Page: 336

View: 1753

When George Washington bade farewell to his officers, he did so in New York's Fraunces Tavern. When Andrew Jackson planned his defense of New Orleans against the British in 1815, he met Jean Lafitte in a grog shop. And when John Wilkes Booth plotted with his accomplices to carry out an assassination, they gathered in Surratt Tavern. In America Walks into a Bar, Christine Sismondo recounts the rich and fascinating history of an institution often reviled, yet always central to American life. She traces the tavern from England to New England, showing how even the Puritans valued "a good Beere." With fast-paced narration and lively characters, she carries the story through the twentieth century and beyond, from repeated struggles over licensing and Sunday liquor sales, from the Whiskey Rebellion to the temperance movement, from attempts to ban "treating" to Prohibition and repeal. As the cockpit of organized crime, politics, and everyday social life, the bar has remained vital--and controversial--down to the present. In 2006, when the Hurricane Katrina Emergency Tax Relief Act was passed, a rider excluded bars from applying for aid or tax breaks on the grounds that they contributed nothing to the community. Sismondo proves otherwise: the bar has contributed everything to the American story. Now in paperback, Sismondo's heady cocktail of agile prose and telling anecdotes offers a resounding toast to taprooms, taverns, saloons, speakeasies, and the local hangout where everybody knows your name.

Historic Taverns of Boston

370 Years of Tavern History in One Definitive Guide

Author: Gavin Nathan

Publisher: iUniverse

ISBN: 0595393705

Category: History

Page: 140

View: 4816

The best single source on Boston taverns, then and now. A must have guide for locals and visitors alike: Visit the best examples of old taverns in and around Boston now. Learn how taverns evolved from 1630 to today. Create authentic drinks including Flap Dragon, Flip, Grog, Gumption, Jingle, Syllabub and Whistle Belly Vengeance. Cook a tavern feast, influenced by local ingredients and native Indian cooking. Explore the role taverns played in the Boston Tea Party, Paul Revere's Ride, the Siege of Boston and the Battle of Bunker Hill. Meet the tavern keepers of bygone Boston and their colorful clientele including James Otis, Sam Adams and Judge Sewall. Discover the origins of local tavern names such as the Bunch of Grapes, Bell in Hand and Green Dragon. Unearth the hidden history in Boston taverns today.

Forgotten Drinks of Colonial New England

From Flips and Rattle-Skulls to Switchel and Spruce Beer

Author: Corin Hirsch

Publisher: Arcadia Publishing

ISBN: 1625847270

Category: History

Page: 128

View: 8345

Colonial New England was awash in ales, beers, wines, cider and spirits. Everyone from teenage farmworkers to our founding fathers imbibed heartily and often. Tipples at breakfast, lunch, teatime and dinner were the norm, and low-alcohol hard cider was sometimes even a part of children's lives. This burgeoning cocktail culture reflected the New World's abundance of raw materials: apples, sugar and molasses, wild berries and hops. This plentiful drinking sustained a slew of smoky taverns and inns--watering holes that became vital meeting places and the nexuses of unrest as the Revolution brewed. New England food and drinks writer Corin Hirsch explores the origins and taste of the favorite potations of early Americans and offers some modern-day recipes to revive them today..

Robert Love's Warnings

Searching for Strangers in Colonial Boston

Author: Cornelia H. Dayton,Sharon V. Salinger

Publisher: University of Pennsylvania Press

ISBN: 0812245938

Category: History

Page: 272

View: 1735

In colonial America, the system of "warning out" was distinctive to New England, a way for a community to regulate those to whom it would extend welfare. Robert Love's Warnings animates this nearly forgotten aspect of colonial life, richly detailing the moral and legal basis of the practice and the religious and humanistic vision of those who enforced it. Historians Cornelia H. Dayton and Sharon V. Salinger follow one otherwise obscure town clerk, Robert Love, as he walked through Boston's streets to tell sojourners, "in His Majesty's Name," that they were warned to depart the town in fourteen days. This declaration meant not that newcomers literally had to leave, but that they could not claim legal settlement or rely on town poor relief. Warned youths and adults could reside, work, marry, or buy a house in the city. If they became needy, their relief was paid for by the province treasurer. Warning thus functioned as a registration system, encouraging the flow of labor and protecting town coffers. Between 1765 and 1774, Robert Love warned four thousand itinerants, including youthful migrant workers, demobilized British soldiers, recently exiled Acadians, and women following the redcoats who occupied Boston in 1768. Appointed warner at age sixty-eight owing to his unusual capacity for remembering faces, Love kept meticulous records of the sojourners he spoke to, including where they lodged and whether they were lame, ragged, drunk, impudent, homeless, or begging. Through these documents, Dayton and Salinger reconstruct the biographies of travelers, exploring why so many people were on the move throughout the British Atlantic and why they came to Boston. With a fresh interpretation of the role that warning played in Boston's civic structure and street life, Robert Love's Warnings reveals the complex legal, social, and political landscape of New England in the decade before the Revolution.

Colonial Spirits

A Toast to Our Drunken History

Author: Steven Grasse

Publisher: Abrams

ISBN: 1613122217

Category: Cooking

Page: 224

View: 1684

In Colonial Spirits, Steven Grasse presents a historical manifesto on drinking, including 50 colonial era– inspired cocktail recipes. The book features a rousing timeline of colonial imbibing and a cultural overview of a dizzying number of drinks: beer, rum and punch; temperance drinks; liqueurs and cordials; medicinal beverages; cider; wine, whiskey, and bourbon—all peppered with liquored-up adages from our founding fathers. There is also expert guidance on DIY methods for home brewing. Imbibe your way through each chapter, with recipes like the Philadelphia Fish House Punch (a crowd pleaser!) and Snakebites (drink alone!). Hot beer cocktails and rattle skulls have never been so completely irresistible.

Every Home a Distillery

Alcohol, Gender, and Technology in the Colonial Chesapeake

Author: Sarah H. Meacham

Publisher: JHU Press

ISBN: 0801893127

Category: Cooking

Page: 187

View: 5709

In this original examination of alcohol production in early America, Sarah Hand Meacham uncovers the crucial role women played in cidering and distilling in the colonial Chesapeake. Her fascinating story is one defined by gender, class, technology, and changing patterns of production. Alcohol was essential to colonial life; the region’s water was foul, milk was generally unavailable, and tea and coffee were far too expensive for all but the very wealthy. Colonists used alcohol to drink, in cooking, as a cleaning agent, in beauty products, and as medicine. Meacham finds that the distillation and brewing of alcohol for these purposes traditionally fell to women. Advice and recipes in such guidebooks as The Accomplisht Ladys Delight demonstrate that women were the main producers of alcohol until the middle of the 18th century. Men, mostly small planters, then supplanted women, using new and cheaper technologies to make the region’s cider, ale, and whiskey. Meacham compares alcohol production in the Chesapeake with that in New England, the middle colonies, and Europe, finding the Chesapeake to be far more isolated than even the other American colonies. She explains how home brewers used new technologies, such as small alembic stills and inexpensive cider pressing machines, in their alcoholic enterprises. She links the importation of coffee and tea in America to the temperance movement, showing how the wealthy became concerned with alcohol consumption only after they found something less inebriating to drink. Taking a few pages from contemporary guidebooks, Every Home a Distillery includes samples of historic recipes and instructions on how to make alcoholic beverages. American historians will find this study both enlightening and surprising.

Bucket List Bars

Historic Saloons, Pubs, and Dives of America

Author: Clint Lanier,Derek Hembree

Publisher: Greenleaf Book Group

ISBN: 1937110443

Category: Travel

Page: 352

View: 1414

Find your way to the most historic saloons, pubs, and dives of America. These are the watering holes that shaped our nation and created our country. Find the favorite spots of our Founding Fathers, the places where the most well-known celebrities could relax, and the joints that most wouldn’t walk into without a bodyguard. For each bar, you will get a complete history taken directly from the owners and bartenders. You’ll find out what to expect when you go today. You’ll get advice on what drinks and food to order. And we’ll even share insider’s tips so you won’t stand out like a tourist. You’ll also get instant access to brief online documentaries made for each bar so you’ll know before going exactly what to expect, what to order, and who to talk to. Bucket List Bars is the definitive guide to the historic saloons, pubs, and dives of America. Also Included: • QR Code-Linked Documentary Video of Each Bar—A First of its Kind for Guidebooks • QR Code-Linked Videos of Their Signature Drinks So You Know What to Order • Nearby Distractions in the Area To Make Each Visit Complete • Other Notable Bars Nearby To Visit If You Have the Time Featuring: Austin Boston Area Chicago Denver El Paso area Las Vegas Los Angeles New York City Philadelphia San Antonio San Francisco Tucson Area -- This book provides travel-guide like information to business travelers, history buffs and drinking culture enthusiasts. My partner and I have spent the last year traveling the country filming, photographic and documenting almost 50 historic bars from New York to Los Angeles, from 1673 to 1968. We've not only written about these, but also created brief documentaries of each that showcases them in their historic context, provides an assessment of food, drink, decor, etc, and interviews the bartenders and owners. Each chapter will include QR codes linking the reader to these videos that they can watch on their mobile device for free. This will be the first book in a multi-book series based on the same theme.

Alehouses and Good Fellowship in Early Modern England

Author: Mark Hailwood

Publisher: Boydell & Brewer Ltd

ISBN: 1843839423

Category: History

Page: 253

View: 2655

Representing a history of drinking 'from below', this book explores the role of the alehouse in seventeenth-century English society.

The World of the Tavern

Public Houses in Early Modern Europe

Author: Beat Kumin

Publisher: Taylor & Francis

ISBN: 1351880284

Category:

Page: N.A

View: 6126

The subject of drink received a great deal of attention from early modern Europeans. Preachers, physicians, authorities, artists and travellers all addressed it from a range of different perspectives. At the same time, inns, taverns and alehouses served as multifunctional centres in towns and villages throughout Europe. This combination resulted in a wealth of sources, both institutional and cultural, which are only now beginning to be explored. This anthology features new research on public houses in England, Russia and the German lands. In a series of general, thematic and regional studies, contributors engage with broader debates in early modern history, shedding light on such key issues as consumption, travel and communication, state building, confessional identity, fiscal practice, gender and household relations, and the use of public spaces. The result is a volume that should appeal to anybody with an interest in early modern cultural history.

The Alcoholic Republic

An American Tradition

Author: W.J. Rorabaugh

Publisher: Oxford University Press

ISBN: 9780199766314

Category: History

Page: 320

View: 8002

Rorabaugh has written a well thought out and intriguing social history of Americas great alcoholic binge that occurred between 1790 and 1830, what he terms a key formative period in our history....A pioneering work that illuminates a part of our heritage that can no longer be neglected in future studies of Americas social fabric. A bold and frequently illuminating attempt to investigate the relationship of a single social custom to the central features of our historical experience....A book which always asks interesting questions and provides many provocative answers.

Dining On Turtles

Food Feasts and Drinking in History

Author: D. Kirkby,T. Luckins

Publisher: Springer

ISBN: 0230597300

Category: History

Page: 208

View: 2016

As gentlemen of the Royal Society in London sat down to their turtle dinner in 1793 they were participating in an historical event: an act simultaneously of fine dining and colonialism. Feasting and drinking, the communities in which they occurred, and larger themes of historical significance are explored here offering new insights into the past.

Straight Up Or On the Rocks

The Story of the American Cocktail

Author: William Grimes

Publisher: Macmillan

ISBN: 086547656X

Category: Cooking

Page: 208

View: 6967

A revised and expanded social history of social drinking and the cocktail in America discusses 350 years of drinking history--from colonial taverns to today's watering holes--and features more than one hundred recipes, including many new ones, for the most interesting and enduring beverages. Reprint. 10,000 first printing.

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