Search Results: the-adventures-of-amos-n-andy

The Adventures of Amos 'n' Andy

A Social History of an American Phenomenon

Author: Melvin Patrick Ely

Publisher: N.A

ISBN: N.A

Category: Performing Arts

Page: 322

View: 6911

In 1930, 40 million Americans tuned in to Amos 'n' Andy, a radio serial created and acted by two white men, about the adventures of two southern blacks Ely follows the history of the show, discusses the strange charm of the scripts, and the serial's impact on racial issues.

Ein Gentleman in Moskau

Roman

Author: Amor Towles

Publisher: Ullstein Buchverlage

ISBN: 3843716196

Category: Fiction

Page: 560

View: 1355

Moskau, 1922. Der genussfreudige Lebemann Graf Rostov wird verhaftet und zu lebenslangem Hausarrest verurteilt, ausgerechnet im Hotel Metropol, dem ersten Haus am Platz. Er muss alle bisher genossenen Privilegien aufgeben und eine Arbeit als Hilfskellner annehmen. Rostov mit seinen 30 Jahren ist ein äußerst liebenswürdiger, immer optimistischer Gentleman. Trotz seiner eingeschränkten Umstände lebt er ganz seine Überzeugung, dass selbst kleine gute Taten einer chaotischen Welt Sinn verleihen. Aber ihm bleibt nur der Blick aus dem Fenster, während draußen Russland stürmische Dekaden durchlebt. Seine Stunde kommt, als eine alte Freundin ihm ihre kleine Tochter anvertraut. Das Kind ändert Rostovs Leben von Grund auf. Für das Mädchen und sein Leben wächst der Graf über sich hinaus. "Towles ist ein Meistererzähler" New York Times Book Review "Eine charmante Erinnerung an die Bedeutung von gutem Stil" Washington Post "Elegant, dabei gleichzeitig filigran und üppig wie ein Schmuckei von Fabergé" O, the Oprah Magazine

The Original Amos ’n’ Andy

Freeman Gosden, Charles Correll and the 1928–1943 Radio Serial

Author: Elizabeth McLeod

Publisher: McFarland

ISBN: 1476609713

Category: Performing Arts

Page: 223

View: 2477

This critical reexamination of Amos ’n’ Andy, the pioneering creation of Charles Correll and Freeman Gosden, presents an unapologetic but balanced view lacking in most treatments. It relies upon an untapped resource—thousands of pages of scripts from the show’s nearly forgotten earliest version, which most clearly reflected the vision of its creators. Consequently, it provides fresh insights and in part refutes the usual blanket condemnations of this groundbreaking show. The text incorporates numerous script excerpts, provides key background information, and also acknowledges the show’s importance to radio broadcasting and modern entertainment.

Komik als Kommunikation der Kulturen

Beispiele von türkischstämmigen und muslimischen Gruppen in Deutschland

Author: Christopher Kloë

Publisher: Springer-Verlag

ISBN: 3658172010

Category: Social Science

Page: 561

View: 5181

Christopher Kloë stellt in diesem Buch Samuel Huntingtons Hypothese eines Kampfes der Kulturen die Systematik einer Begegnung der Kulturen gegenüber. Diese wird durch das Mittel der medialen komischen Kommunikation von (Selbst-)Darstellungen anhand der Thesen von Homi K. Bhabha, Thilo Sarrazin, Alfred Schütz und Zygmunt Bauman erläutert. Der Vorgang einer ansteigenden Auseinandersetzung mit den jeweils Fremden auch in der Form von komischen Inszenierungen, die als analog zum ansteigenden Eintritt von Fremden in den lokalen sozialen Raum betrachtet wird, erläutert der Autor am Beispiel von türkischstämmigen und muslimischen Gruppen in Deutschland und im Vergleich zu Minderheiten im westlichen Kulturkreis.

The Strange Career of Porgy and Bess

Race, Culture, and America’s Most Famous Opera

Author: Ellen Noonan

Publisher: UNC Press Books

ISBN: 0807837334

Category: Performing Arts

Page: 440

View: 3814

Created by George Gershwin and DuBose Heyward and sung by generations of black performers, Porgy and Bess has been both embraced and reviled since its debut in 1935. In this comprehensive account, Ellen Noonan examines the opera's long history of invention and reinvention as a barometer of twentieth-century American expectations about race, culture, and the struggle for equality. In its surprising endurance lies a myriad of local, national, and international stories. For black performers and commentators, Porgy and Bess was a nexus for debates about cultural representation and racial uplift. White producers, critics, and even audiences spun revealing racial narratives around the show, initially in an attempt to demonstrate its authenticity and later to keep it from becoming discredited or irrelevant. Expertly weaving together the wide-ranging debates over the original novel, Porgy, and its adaptations on stage and film with a history of its intimate ties to Charleston, The Strange Career of "Porgy and Bess" uncovers the complexities behind one of our nation's most long-lived cultural touchstones.

Visions of Belonging

Family Stories, Popular Culture, and Postwar Democracy, 1940-1960

Author: Judith E. Smith

Publisher: Columbia University Press

ISBN: 023150926X

Category: History

Page: 480

View: 7399

Visions of Belonging explores how beloved and still-remembered family stories—A Tree Grows in Brooklyn, I Remember Mama, Gentleman's Agreement, Death of a Salesman, Marty, and A Raisin in the Sun—entered the popular imagination and shaped collective dreams in the postwar years and into the 1950s. These stories helped define widely shared conceptions of who counted as representative Americans and who could be recognized as belonging. The book listens in as white and black authors and directors, readers and viewers reveal divergent, emotionally textured, and politically charged social visions. Their diverse perspectives provide a point of entry into an extraordinary time when the possibilities for social transformation seemed boundless. But changes were also fiercely contested, especially as the war's culture of unity receded in the resurgence of cold war anticommunism, and demands for racial equality were met with intensifying white resistance. Judith E. Smith traces the cultural trajectory of these family stories, as they circulated widely in bestselling paperbacks, hit movies, and popular drama on stage, radio, and television. Visions of Belonging provides unusually close access to a vibrant conversation among white and black Americans about the boundaries between public life and family matters and the meanings of race and ethnicity. Would the new appearance of white working class ethnic characters expand Americans'understanding of democracy? Would these stories challenge the color line? How could these stories simultaneously show that black families belonged to the larger "family" of the nation while also representing the forms of danger and discriminations that excluded them from full citizenship? In the 1940s, war-driven challenges to racial and ethnic borderlines encouraged hesitant trespass against older notions of "normal." But by the end of the 1950s, the cold war cultural atmosphere discouraged probing of racial and social inequality and ultimately turned family stories into a comforting retreat from politics. The book crosses disciplinary boundaries, suggesting a novel method for cultural history by probing the social history of literary, dramatic, and cinematic texts. Smith's innovative use of archival research sets authorial intent next to audience reception to show how both contribute to shaping the contested meanings of American belonging.

Vaudeville old & new

an encyclopedia of variety performances in America

Author: N.A

Publisher: Psychology Press

ISBN: 0415938538

Category: Entertainers

Page: 639

View: 3747

Electric Sounds

Technological Change and the Rise of Corporate Mass Media

Author: Steve J. Wurtzler

Publisher: Columbia University Press

ISBN: 023151008X

Category: Performing Arts

Page: 416

View: 9387

Electric Sounds brings to vivid life an era when innovations in the production, recording, and transmission of sound revolutionized a number of different media, especially the radio, the phonograph, and the cinema. The 1920s and 1930s marked some of the most important developments in the history of the American mass media: the film industry's conversion to synchronous sound, the rise of radio networks and advertising-supported broadcasting, the establishment of a federal regulatory framework on which U.S. communications policy continues to be based, the development of several powerful media conglomerates, and the birth of a new acoustic commodity in which a single story, song, or other product was made available to consumers in multiple media forms and formats. But what role would this new media play in society? Celebrants saw an opportunity for educational and cultural uplift; critics feared the degradation of the standards of public taste. Some believed acoustic media would fulfill the promise of participatory democracy by better informing the public, while others saw an opportunity for manipulation. The innovations of this period prompted not only a restructuring and consolidation of corporate mass media interests and a shift in the conventions and patterns of media consumption but also a renegotiation of the social functions assigned to mass media forms. Steve J. Wurtzler's impeccably researched history adds a new dimension to the study of sound media, proving that the ultimate form technology takes is never predetermined. Rather, it is shaped by conflicting visions of technological possibility in economic, cultural, and political realms. Electric Sounds also illustrates the process through which technologies become media and the ways in which media are integrated into American life.

Wunder Sieh mich nicht an

Author: Raquel J. Palacio

Publisher: N.A

ISBN: 9783423625890

Category: Children with disabilities

Page: 448

View: 6957

Wonder is the funny, sweet and incredibly moving story of Auggie Pullman. Auggie wants to be an ordinary ten-year-old, but he is far from ordinary. Born with a terrible facial deformity, this shy, bright ten-year-old has been home-schooled by his parents for his whole life, in an attempt to protect him from the stares and cruelty of the outside world. Now, for the first time, Auggie is being sent to a real school - and he's dreading it. Auggie sees himself as just an ordinary kid and all he wants is to be accepted. But can he convince his new classmates that he's just like them, underneath it all?

Black, White, and in Color

Television and Black Civil Rights

Author: Sasha Torres

Publisher: Princeton University Press

ISBN: 9780691016573

Category: Performing Arts

Page: 140

View: 8040

This book examines the representation of blackness on television at the height of the southern civil rights movement and again in the aftermath of the Reagan-Bush years. In the process, it looks carefully at how television's ideological projects with respect to race have supported or conflicted with the industry's incentive to maximize profits or consolidate power. Sasha Torres examines the complex relations between the television industry and the civil rights movement as a knot of overlapping interests. She argues that television coverage of the civil rights movement during 1955-1965 encouraged viewers to identify with black protestors and against white police, including such infamous villains as Birmingham's Bull Connor and Selma's Jim Clark. Torres then argues that television of the 1990s encouraged viewers to identify with police against putatively criminal blacks, even in its dramatizations of police brutality. Torres's pioneering analysis makes distinctive contributions to its fields. It challenges television scholars to consider the historical centrality of race to the constitution of the medium's genres, visual conventions, and industrial structures. And it displaces the analytical focus on stereotypes that has hamstrung assessments of television's depiction of African Americans, concentrating instead on the ways in which African Americans and their political collectives have actively shaped that depiction to advance civil rights causes. This book also challenges African American studies to pay closer and better attention to television's ongoing role in the organization and disorganization of U.S. racial politics.

Dreaming of Dixie

How the South Was Created in American Popular Culture

Author: Karen L. Cox

Publisher: UNC Press Books

ISBN: 0807877786

Category: Social Science

Page: 224

View: 8849

From the late nineteenth century through World War II, popular culture portrayed the American South as a region ensconced in its antebellum past, draped in moonlight and magnolias, and represented by such southern icons as the mammy, the belle, the chivalrous planter, white-columned mansions, and even bolls of cotton. In Dreaming of Dixie, Karen Cox shows that the chief purveyors of nostalgia for the Old South were outsiders of the region, playing to consumers' anxiety about modernity by marketing the South as a region still dedicated to America's pastoral traditions. In addition, Cox examines how southerners themselves embraced the imaginary romance of the region's past.

Declarations of Dependence

The Long Reconstruction of Popular Politics in the South, 1861-1908

Author: Gregory Downs

Publisher: UNC Press Books

ISBN: 080787776X

Category: History

Page: 360

View: 344

In this highly original study, Gregory Downs argues that the most American of wars, the Civil War, created a seemingly un-American popular politics, rooted not in independence but in voluntary claims of dependence. Through an examination of the pleas and petitions of ordinary North Carolinians, Declarations of Dependence contends that the Civil War redirected, not destroyed, claims of dependence by exposing North Carolinians to the expansive but unsystematic power of Union and Confederate governments, and by loosening the legal ties that bound them to husbands, fathers, and masters. Faced with anarchy during the long reconstruction of government authority, people turned fervently to the government for protection and sustenance, pleading in fantastic, intimate ways for attention. This personalistic, or what Downs calls patronal, politics allowed for appeals from subordinate groups like freed blacks and poor whites, and also bound people emotionally to newly expanding postwar states. Downs's argument rewrites the history of the relationship between Americans and their governments, showing the deep roots of dependence, the complex impact of the Civil War upon popular politics, and the powerful role of Progressivism and segregation in submerging a politics of dependence that--in new form--rose again in the New Deal and persists today.

The Columbia Documentary History of Race and Ethnicity in America

Author: Ronald H. Bayor

Publisher: Columbia University Press

ISBN: 0231508409

Category: History

Page: 1104

View: 932

All historians would agree that America is a nation of nations. But what does that mean in terms of the issues that have moved and shaped us as a people? Contemporary concerns such as bilingualism, incorporation/assimilation, dual identity, ethnic politics, quotas and affirmative action, residential segregation, and the volume of immigration resonate with a past that has confronted variations of these modern issues. The Columbia Documentary History of Race and Ethnicity in America, written and compiled by a highly respected team of American historians under the editorship of Ronald Bayor, illuminates the myriad ways in which immigration, racial, and ethnic histories have shaped the contours of contemporary American society. This invaluable resource documents all eras of the American past, including black–white interactions and the broad spectrum of American attitudes and reactions concerning Native Americans, Irish Catholics, Mexican Americans, Jewish Americans, and other groups. Each of the eight chronological chapters contains a survey essay, an annotated bibliography, and 20 to 30 related public and private primary source documents, including manifestos, speeches, court cases, letters, memoirs, and much more. From the 1655 petition of Jewish merchants regarding the admission of Jews to the New Netherlands colony to an interview with a Chinese American worker regarding a 1938 strike in San Francisco, documents are drawn from a variety of sources and allow students and others direct access to our past. Selections include Powhatan to John Smith, 1609 Thomas Jefferson—"Notes on the State of Virginia" Petition of the Trustees of Congregation Shearith Israel, 1811 Bessie Conway or, The Irish Girl in America German Society in Chicago, Annual Report, 1857–1858. "Mark Twain's Salutation to the Century" W. E. B. DuBois, "Of Our Spiritual Strivings" NAACP on Black Schoolteachers'Fight for Equal Pay Malcom X speech, 1964 Hewy Newton interview and Black Panther Party platform Preamble—La Raza Unida Party Lee lacocca speech to Ethnic Heritage Council of the Pacific Northwest, 1984 Native American Graves and Repatriation Act, 1990 L.A. riot—from the Los Angeles Times, May 3, 15, 1992; Nov. 16, 19, 1992 Asian American Political Alliance President Clinton's Commission on Race, Town Meeting, 1997 Louis Farrakhan—"The Vision for the Million Man March"

Forgeries of Memory and Meaning

Blacks and the Regimes of Race in American Theater and Film before World War II

Author: Cedric J. Robinson

Publisher: UNC Press Books

ISBN: 1469606755

Category: Social Science

Page: 456

View: 9801

Cedric J. Robinson offers a new understanding of race in America through his analysis of theater and film of the early twentieth century. He argues that economic, political, and cultural forces present in the eras of silent film and the early "talkies" firmly entrenched limited representations of African Americans. Robinson grounds his study in contexts that illuminate the parallel growth of racial beliefs and capitalism, beginning with Shakespearean England and the development of international trade. He demonstrates how the needs of American commerce determined the construction of successive racial regimes that were publicized in the theater and in motion pictures, particularly through plantation and jungle films. In addition to providing new depth and complexity to the history of black representation, Robinson examines black resistance to these practices. Whereas D. W. Griffith appropriated black minstrelsy and romanticized a national myth of origins, Robinson argues that Oscar Micheaux transcended uplift films to create explicitly political critiques of the American national myth. Robinson's analysis marks a new way of approaching the intellectual, political, and media racism present in the beginnings of American narrative cinema.

Electronic Media

Then, Now, and Later

Author: Norman J. Medoff,Barbara Kaye

Publisher: Taylor & Francis

ISBN: 1136030417

Category: Language Arts & Disciplines

Page: 12

View: 4291

Electronic Media connects the traditional world of broadcasting with the contemporary universe of digital electronic media. It provides a synopsis of the beginnings of electronic media in broadcasting, and the subsequent advancements into digital media. Underlying the structure of the book is a "See It Then, See It Now, See It Later approach that focuses on how past innovations lay the groundwork for changing trends in technology, providing the opportunity and demand for change in both broadcasting and digital media. FYI and Zoom-In boxes point to further information, tying together the immediate and long-ranging issues surrounding electronic media. Career Tracks feature the experiences of industry experts and share tips in how to approach this challenging industry. Check out the companion website at http://www.routledge.com/cw/medoff-9780240812564/ for materials for both students and instructors.

Art for Equality

The NAACP's Cultural Campaign for Civil Rights

Author: Jenny Woodley

Publisher: University Press of Kentucky

ISBN: 0813145171

Category: Social Science

Page: 270

View: 6783

The National Association for the Advancement of Colored People (NAACP) is the nation's oldest civil rights organization, having dedicated itself to the fight for racial equality since 1909. While the group helped achieve substantial victories in the courtroom, the struggle for civil rights extended beyond gaining political support. It also required changing social attitudes. The NAACP thus worked to alter existing prejudices through the production of art that countered racist depictions of African Americans, focusing its efforts not only on changing the attitudes of the white middle class but also on encouraging racial pride and a sense of identity in the black community. Art for Equality explores an important and little-studied side of the NAACP's activism in the cultural realm. In openly supporting African American artists, writers, and musicians in their creative endeavors, the organization aimed to change the way the public viewed the black community. By overcoming stereotypes and the belief of the majority that African Americans were physically, intellectually, and morally inferior to whites, the NAACP believed it could begin to defeat racism. Illuminating important protests, from the fight against the 1915 film The Birth of a Nation to the production of anti-lynching art during the Harlem Renaissance, this insightful volume examines the successes and failures of the NAACP's cultural campaign from 1910 to the 1960s. Exploring the roles of gender and class in shaping the association's patronage of the arts, Art for Equality offers an in-depth analysis of the social and cultural climate during a time of radical change in America.

Legacy of My Father

Author: Waverley Traylor

Publisher: iUniverse

ISBN: 9781469796383

Category: Biography & Autobiography

Page: 296

View: 6460

Waverley Traylor grew up knowing little about his father’s life or what made him tick. Yet like life itself, time breeds change. After his father was unable to obtain the Purple Heart medal for his service in World War II, Traylor embarked on a fascinating journey to not only prove his father’s qualifications, but also to learn more about his father’s true identity. Legacy of My Father is the result of years of research by Traylor, who visited family and comrades around the nation, extensively read about World War II battles, and sorted through thousands of photographs, newspapers, and letters in order to accurately share his father’s compelling life story. Presented in three distinct periods, this biography describes his father’s childhood growing up in pre- and post-Depression America, where he became a well-adjusted youth with strong Christian values. Later, his father was drafted into the US Marines and sent to fight in one of the bloodiest battles in the history of the Corps; Traylor shares heartbreaking details how these events forever changed his father’s post war life. This moving biography shares the intriguing story of a courageous man haunted by war until his last days on Earth and honors the unique relationship he shared only with his son.

Black Television Travels

African American Media around the Globe

Author: Timothy Havens

Publisher: NYU Press

ISBN: 0814760767

Category: Social Science

Page: 224

View: 6051

“Black Television Travels provides a detailed and insightful view of the roots and routes of the televisual representations of blackness on the transnational media landscape. By following the circulation of black cultural products and their institutionalized discourses—including industry lore, taste cultures, and the multiple stories of black experiences that have and have not made it onto the small screen—Havens complicates discussions of racial representation and exposes possibilities for more expansive representations of blackness while recognizing the limitations of the seemingly liberatory spaces created by globalization.” —Bambi Haggins, Associate Professor of Film and Media Studies at Arizona State University “A major achievement that makes important contributions to the analysis of race, identity, global media, nation, and television production cultures. Discussions of race and television are too often constricted within national boundaries, yet this fantastic book offers a strong, compelling, and utterly refreshing corrective. Read it, assign it, use it.” —Jonathan Gray, author of Television Entertainment, Television Studies, and Show Sold Separately Black Television Travels explores the globalization of African American television and the way in which foreign markets, programming strategies, and viewer preferences have influenced portrayals of African Americans on the small screen. Television executives have been notoriously slow to recognize the potential popularity of black characters and themes, both at home and abroad. As American television brokers increasingly seek revenues abroad, their assumptions about saleability and audience perceptions directly influence the global circulation of these programs, as well as their content. Black Television Travels aims to reclaim the history of African American television circulation in an effort to correct and counteract this predominant industry lore. Based on interviews with television executives and programmers from around the world, as well as producers in the United States, Havens traces the shift from an era when national television networks often blocked African American television from traveling abroad to the transnational, post-network era of today. While globalization has helped to expand diversity in African American television, particularly in regard to genre, it has also resulted in restrictions, such as in the limited portrayal of African American women in favor of attracting young male demographics across racial and national boundaries. Havens underscores the importance of examining boardroom politics as part of racial discourse in the late modern era, when transnational cultural industries like television are the primary sources for dominant representations of blackness.

Israel on the Appomattox

A Southern Experiment in Black Freedom from the 1790s Through the Civil War

Author: Melvin Patrick Ely

Publisher: Vintage

ISBN: 0307773426

Category: History

Page: 656

View: 7232

WINNER OF THE BANCROFT PRIZEA New York Times Book Review and Atlantic Monthly Editors' ChoiceThomas Jefferson denied that whites and freed blacks could live together in harmony. His cousin, Richard Randolph, not only disagreed, but made it possible for ninety African Americans to prove Jefferson wrong. Israel on the Appomattox tells the story of these liberated blacks and the community they formed, called Israel Hill, in Prince Edward County, Virginia. There, ex-slaves established farms, navigated the Appomattox River, and became entrepreneurs. Free blacks and whites did business with one another, sued each other, worked side by side for equal wages, joined forces to found a Baptist congregation, moved west together, and occasionally settled down as man and wife. Slavery cast its grim shadow, even over the lives of the free, yet on Israel Hill we discover a moving story of hardship and hope that defies our expectations of the Old South. From the Trade Paperback edition.

Find eBook