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The Astronomy of the Bible

An Elementary Commentary on the Astronomical References of Holy Scripture

Author: Edward Walter Maunder

Publisher:

ISBN:

Category: Astronomy

Page: 410

View: 984

The Astronomy of the Bible: an Elementary Commentary on the Astronomical References of Holy Scripture

Author: E.W. Maunder

Publisher: Library of Alexandria

ISBN:

Category: Astronomy in the Bible

Page: 410

View: 300

The Astronomy of the Bible; An Elementary Commentary on the Astronomical References of Holy Scripture

Author: Edward Walter Maunder

Publisher: Franklin Classics

ISBN:

Category:

Page: 434

View: 986

This work has been selected by scholars as being culturally important and is part of the knowledge base of civilization as we know it. This work is in the public domain in the United States of America, and possibly other nations. Within the United States, you may freely copy and distribute this work, as no entity (individual or corporate) has a copyright on the body of the work. Scholars believe, and we concur, that this work is important enough to be preserved, reproduced, and made generally available to the public. To ensure a quality reading experience, this work has been proofread and republished using a format that seamlessly blends the original graphical elements with text in an easy-to-read typeface. We appreciate your support of the preservation process, and thank you for being an important part of keeping this knowledge alive and relevant.

The Astronomy of the Bible

An Elementary Commentary on the Astronomical References of Holy Scripture

Author: E. Walter Maunder

Publisher: CreateSpace

ISBN:

Category:

Page: 374

View: 188

Why should an astronomer write a commentary on the Bible? Because commentators as a rule are not astronomers, and therefore either pass over the astronomical allusions of Scripture in silence, or else annotate them in a way which, from a scientific point of view, leaves much to be desired. Astronomical allusions in the Bible, direct and indirect, are not few in number, and, in order to bring out their full significance, need to be treated astronomically. Astronomy further gives us the power of placing ourselves to some degree in the position of the patriarchs and prophets of old. We know that the same sun and moon, stars and planets, shine upon us as shone upon Abraham and Moses, David and Isaiah. We can, if we will, see the unchanging heavens with their eyes, and understand their attitude towards them. It is worth while for us so to do. For the immense advances in science, made since the Canon of Holy Scripture was closed, and especially during the last three hundred years, may enable us to realize the significance of a most remarkable fact. Even in those early ages, when to all the nations surrounding Israel the heavenly bodies were objects for divination or idolatry, the attitude of the sacred writers toward them was perfect in its sanity and truth.

The Astronomy of the Bible; An Elementary Commentary on the Astronomical References of Holy Scripture - Scholar's Choice Edition

Author: Edward Walter Maunder

Publisher: Scholar's Choice

ISBN:

Category:

Page: 436

View: 579

This work has been selected by scholars as being culturally important, and is part of the knowledge base of civilization as we know it. This work was reproduced from the original artifact, and remains as true to the original work as possible. Therefore, you will see the original copyright references, library stamps (as most of these works have been housed in our most important libraries around the world), and other notations in the work. This work is in the public domain in the United States of America, and possibly other nations. Within the United States, you may freely copy and distribute this work, as no entity (individual or corporate) has a copyright on the body of the work.As a reproduction of a historical artifact, this work may contain missing or blurred pages, poor pictures, errant marks, etc. Scholars believe, and we concur, that this work is important enough to be preserved, reproduced, and made generally available to the public. We appreciate your support of the preservation process, and thank you for being an important part of keeping this knowledge alive and relevant.

Astronomy of the Bible

An Elementary Commentary on the Astronomical References of Holy Scripture

Author:

Publisher:

ISBN:

Category: Electronic book

Page:

View: 301

Job 38-42

WBC Volume 18B

Author: David J. A. Clines

Publisher: Thomas Nelson

ISBN:

Category: Religion

Page: 544

View: 706

Complete the Old Testament series of the Word Biblical Commentary with Dr. David Clines’ monumental study of Job. Volume 18B is devoted entirely to the response of the Lord from the tempest to Job, together with the replies of Job (Job 38–42), presenting the Lord's own explanation of his manifold purposes in creation and bringing to an unexpected conclusion Job's dramatic quest for justice. Difficult portions of the Hebrew text are thoroughly handled, but the commentary is written for the non-technical reader and scholar alike. Clines uncovers the driving force of the argument and the drama of the book. The Explanation sections at the end of each chapter brilliantly summarize the views of the speakers and offer thoughtful reflections on their theological value. The volume concludes with a unique 250-page bibliography of virtually everything that has been written about the Book of Job, including its influence on art, music and literature. Features include: Complete new translation and verse by verse commentary on the Book of Job, in constant dialogue with other commentators Extensive scholarly notes on the Hebrew text of the book and its many obscure terms Unparalleled bibliography gives sweeping coverage of all aspects of the Book of Job from scholarly books to art, literature, and music

Job 38-42, Volume 18B

Author: David J. A. Clines

Publisher: Zondervan

ISBN:

Category: Religion

Page: 544

View: 671

The Word Biblical Commentary delivers the best in biblical scholarship, from the leading scholars of our day who share a commitment to Scripture as divine revelation. This series emphasizes a thorough analysis of textual, linguistic, structural, and theological evidence. The result is judicious and balanced insight into the meanings of the text in the framework of biblical theology. These widely acclaimed commentaries serve as exceptional resources for the professional theologian and instructor, the seminary or university student, the working minister, and everyone concerned with building theological understanding from a solid base of biblical scholarship. Overview of Commentary Organization Introduction—covers issues pertaining to the whole book, including context, date, authorship, composition, interpretive issues, purpose, and theology. Each section of the commentary includes: Pericope Bibliography—a helpful resource containing the most important works that pertain to each particular pericope. Translation—the author’s own translation of the biblical text, reflecting the end result of exegesis and attending to Hebrew and Greek idiomatic usage of words, phrases, and tenses, yet in reasonably good English. Notes—the author’s notes to the translation that address any textual variants, grammatical forms, syntactical constructions, basic meanings of words, and problems of translation. Form/Structure/Setting—a discussion of redaction, genre, sources, and tradition as they concern the origin of the pericope, its canonical form, and its relation to the biblical and extra-biblical contexts in order to illuminate the structure and character of the pericope. Rhetorical or compositional features important to understanding the passage are also introduced here. Comment—verse-by-verse interpretation of the text and dialogue with other interpreters, engaging with current opinion and scholarly research. Explanation—brings together all the results of the discussion in previous sections to expose the meaning and intention of the text at several levels: (1) within the context of the book itself; (2) its meaning in the OT or NT; (3) its place in the entire canon; (4) theological relevance to broader OT or NT issues. General Bibliography—occurring at the end of each volume, this extensive bibliographycontains all sources used anywhere in the commentary.

The Created Cosmos

What the Bible Reveals About Astronomy

Author: Danny Faulkner

Publisher: New Leaf Publishing Group

ISBN:

Category: Science

Page: 352

View: 874

This text investigates what the Bible has to say about astronomical objects and phenomena. The Bible contains many mentions of astronomical things, beginning with creation and concluding with end-time prophecies. Besides the sun and moon, the Bible names groups of stars, Orion, the Pleiades, and the bears. In addition to what the biblical record shows about astronomical phenomena, many people think that it teaches things that it actually does not teach. These concepts are examined in depth as well. Unique among books discussing the intersection of biblical text and astronomy because of the range of questions explored and answered definitive work that explores many popular questions and misconceptions about the universe and the Bible Sorts fact from fiction and truth from popular myths as the true purpose of these enigmatic lights in the night sky are revealed

Astronomy of the Bible 1908

Author: E. Walter Maunder

Publisher: Kessinger Publishing

ISBN:

Category: Religion

Page: 436

View: 129

An elementary commentary on the astronomical references of the Holy Scripture, with 34 illustrations. Divided into four Books including: Book 1, The Heavenly Bodies: Hebrew and astronomy; creation; deep; firmament; ordinances of the heavens; sun; moon; stars; comets; meteors; eclipses of the sun and moon; Saturn and astrology. Book 2, The Constellations: origin of the constellations; Genesis and the constellations; story of the Deluge; tribes of Israel and the zodiac; leviathan; Pleiades; Orion; Mazzaroth; Arcturus. Book 3, Times and Seasons: day and its division; Sabbath and the week; month; year; Sabbatic year and the jubilee; cycles of Daniel. Book 4, Three Astronomical Marvels: Joshua's long day; dial of Ahaz; star of Bethlehem.

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