Search Results: the-atomic-age-opens

The Atomic Age Opens

Author: Gerald Wendt,Donald Porter Geddes

Publisher: N.A

ISBN: N.A

Category: Atomic bomb

Page: 251

View: 9466

The Making of the Atomic Age

Author: Alwyn McKay

Publisher: Oxford University Press, USA

ISBN: N.A

Category: Atomic bomb

Page: 153

View: 4579

The Making of the Atomic Bomb

Author: Richard Rhodes

Publisher: Simon and Schuster

ISBN: 9781439126226

Category: History

Page: 928

View: 9686

Twenty-five years after its initial publication, The Making of the Atomic Bomb remains the definitive history of nuclear weapons and the Manhattan Project. From the turn-of-the-century discovery of nuclear energy to the dropping of the first bombs on Japan, Richard Rhodes’s Pulitzer Prize-winning book details the science, the people, and the socio-political realities that led to the development of the atomic bomb. This sweeping account begins in the 19th century, with the discovery of nuclear fission, and continues to World War Two and the Americans’ race to beat Hitler’s Nazis. That competition launched the Manhattan Project and the nearly overnight construction of a vast military-industrial complex that culminated in the fateful dropping of the first bombs on Hiroshima and Nagasaki. Reading like a character-driven suspense novel, the book introduces the players in this saga of physics, politics, and human psychology—from FDR and Einstein to the visionary scientists who pioneered quantum theory and the application of thermonuclear fission, including Planck, Szilard, Bohr, Oppenheimer, Fermi, Teller, Meitner, von Neumann, and Lawrence. From nuclear power’s earliest foreshadowing in the work of H.G. Wells to the bright glare of Trinity at Alamogordo and the arms race of the Cold War, this dread invention forever changed the course of human history, and The Making of The Atomic Bomb provides a panoramic backdrop for that story. Richard Rhodes’s ability to craft compelling biographical portraits is matched only by his rigorous scholarship. Told in rich human, political, and scientific detail that any reader can follow, The Making of the Atomic Bomb is a thought-provoking and masterful work.

The Age of Radiance

The Epic Rise and Dramatic Fall of the Atomic Era

Author: Craig Nelson

Publisher: Simon and Schuster

ISBN: 145166043X

Category: History

Page: 448

View: 1460

A narrative of the Atomic Age by the award-winning author of Rocket Man explores the complexities of nuclear energy, citing the contributions of such individuals as Marie Curie, Albert Einstein and Robert Oppenheimer while sharing lesser-known historical details.

Heisenberg in the Atomic Age

Science and the Public Sphere

Author: Cathryn Carson

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

ISBN: 0521821703

Category: History

Page: 541

View: 548

The end of the Second World War opened a new era for science in public life. Heisenberg in the Atomic Age explores the transformations of science's public presence in the postwar Federal Republic of Germany. It shows how Heisenberg's philosophical commentaries, circulating in the mass media, secured his role as science's public philosopher, and it reflects on his policy engagements and public political stands, which helped redefine the relationship between science and the state. With deep archival grounding, the book tracks Heisenberg's interactions with intellectuals from Heidegger to Habermas and political leaders from Adenauer to Brandt. It also traces his evolving statements about his wartime research on nuclear fission for the National Socialist regime. Working between the history of science and German history, the book's central theme is the place of scientific rationality in public life - after the atomic bomb, in the wake of the Third Reich.

Children of the Atomic Bomb

An American Physician's Memoir of Nagasaki, Hiroshima, and the Marshall Islands

Author: James N. Yamazaki,Louis B. Fleming

Publisher: Duke University Press

ISBN: 9780822316589

Category: Biography & Autobiography

Page: 182

View: 1808

Children of the Atomic Bomb is Dr. Yamazaki's account of a lifelong effort to understand and document the impact of nuclear explosions on children, particularly the children conceived but not yet born at the time of the explosions. Assigned in 1949 as Physician in Charge of the United States Atomic Bomb Casualty Commission in Nagasaki, Yamazaki had served as a combat surgeon at the Battle of the Bulge where he had been captured and held as a prisoner of war by the Germans. In Japan he was confronted with violence of another dimension - the devastating impact of a nuclear blast and the particularly insidious effects of radiation on children. Yamazaki's story is also one of striking juxtapositions, an account of a Japanese-American's encounter with racism, the story of a man who fought for his country while his parents were interned in a concentration camp in Arkansas.

The Atomic Bomb and the Origins of the Cold War

Author: Campbell Craig,Sergey S Radchenko

Publisher: Yale University Press

ISBN: 030014265X

Category: History

Page: 232

View: 1835

After a devastating world war, culminating in the obliteration of Hiroshima and Nagasaki, it was clear that the United States and the Soviet Union had to establish a cooperative order if the planet was to escape an atomic World War III. In this provocative study, Campbell Craig and Sergey Radchenko show how the atomic bomb pushed the United States and the Soviet Union not toward cooperation but toward deep bipolar confrontation. Joseph Stalin, sure that the Americans meant to deploy their new weapon against Russia and defeat socialism, would stop at nothing to build his own bomb. Harry Truman, initially willing to consider cooperation, discovered that its pursuit would mean political suicide, especially when news of Soviet atomic spies reached the public. Both superpowers, moreover, discerned a new reality of the atomic age: now, cooperation must be total. The dangers posed by the bomb meant that intermediate measures of international cooperation would protect no one. Yet no two nations in history were less prepared to pursue total cooperation than were the United States and the Soviet Union. The logic of the bomb pointed them toward immediate Cold War.

Adventures in the Atomic Age

From Watts to Washington

Author: Glenn Theodore Seaborg,Eric Seaborg

Publisher: Farrar Straus & Giroux

ISBN: 9780374299910

Category: Biography & Autobiography

Page: 312

View: 1901

The renowned physicist describes his Nobel Prize-winning career, his work with the Manhattan Project, his discovery of the element that makes atomic bombs explode, and his term as chairman of the Atomic Energy Commission.

By the Bomb's Early Light

American Thought and Culture At the Dawn of the Atomic Age

Author: Paul Boyer

Publisher: Univ of North Carolina Press

ISBN: 0807875708

Category: History

Page: 464

View: 6212

Originally published in 1985, By the Bomb's Early Light is the first book to explore the cultural 'fallout' in America during the early years of the atomic age. Paul Boyer argues that the major aspects of the long-running debates about nuclear armament and disarmament developed and took shape soon after the bombing of Hiroshima. The book is based on a wide range of sources, including cartoons, opinion polls, radio programs, movies, literature, song lyrics, slang, and interviews with leading opinion-makers of the time. Through these materials, Boyer shows the surprising and profoundly disturbing ways in which the bomb quickly and totally penetrated the fabric of American life, from the chillingly prophetic forecasts of observers like Lewis Mumford to the Hollywood starlet who launched her career as the 'anatomic bomb.' In a new preface, Boyer discusses recent changes in nuclear politics and attitudes toward the nuclear age.

The First Atomic Age

Scientists, Radiations, and the American Public, 1895–1945

Author: Matthew Lavine

Publisher: Palgrave Macmillan

ISBN: 9781349455478

Category: Science

Page: 247

View: 5627

At the close of the 19th century, strange new forms of energy arrested the American public's attention in ways that no scientific discovery ever had before. This groundbreaking cultural history tells the story of the first nuclear culture, one whose lasting effects would be seen in the familiar "atomic age" of the post-war twentieth century.

Almighty

Courage, Resistance, and Existential Peril in the Nuclear Age

Author: Dan Zak

Publisher: Penguin

ISBN: 0399173757

Category: HISTORY

Page: 402

View: 4640

On July 28, 2012, three senior citizens broke into one of the most secure nuclear-weapons facilities in the world. An 82 Catholic nun, a Vietnam veteran, and a house smeared the walls with human blood and spray-painted quotes from the Bible. Then they waited to be arrested. This simple act spawned a complex discussion. In Almighty, Washington Post writer Dan Zak examines how events over the past 70 years led to this act, one of the most successful and high-profile demonstrations of anti-nuclear activism.

Dr. Strangelove's America

Society and Culture in the Atomic Age

Author: Margot Ann Henriksen

Publisher: N.A

ISBN: N.A

Category:

Page: 1248

View: 2232

Under the Cloud

The Decades of Nuclear Testing

Author: N.A

Publisher: Two-Sixty Press

ISBN: 9780029216200

Category: Nuclear weapons

Page: 547

View: 9929

Documents the history of America's nuclear testing program, emphasizing the effects of the radioactive clouds the test blasts produced

The Pope of Physics

Enrico Fermi and the Birth of the Atomic Age

Author: Gino Segrè,Bettina Hoerlin

Publisher: Henry Holt and Company

ISBN: 1627790063

Category: Biography & Autobiography

Page: 400

View: 7838

Enrico Fermi is unquestionably among the greats of the world's physicists, the most famous Italian scientist since Galileo. Called the Pope by his peers, he was regarded as infallible in his instincts and research. His discoveries changed our world; they led to weapons of mass destruction and conversely to life-saving medical interventions. This unassuming man struggled with issues relevant today, such as the threat of nuclear annihilation and the relationship of science to politics. Fleeing Fascism and anti-Semitism, Fermi became a leading figure in America's most secret project: building the atomic bomb. The last physicist who mastered all branches of the discipline, Fermi was a rare mixture of theorist and experimentalist. His rich legacy encompasses key advances in fields as diverse as comic rays, nuclear technology, and early computers. In their revealing book, The Pope of Physics, Gino Segré and Bettina Hoerlin bring this scientific visionary to life. An examination of the human dramas that touched Fermi’s life as well as a thrilling history of scientific innovation in the twentieth century, this is the comprehensive biography that Fermi deserves.

Hiroshima

Author: John Hersey

Publisher: Vintage

ISBN: 0679721037

Category: History

Page: 152

View: 3269

The classic tale of the day the first atom bomb was dropped offers a haunting evocation of the memories of survivors and an appeal to the conscience of humanity

Pandora's Keepers

Nine Men and the Atomic Bomb

Author: Brian Van DeMark

Publisher: Little, Brown

ISBN: 9780759528079

Category: History

Page: 432

View: 4021

There Were Nine of Them: men with the names Oppenheimer, Teller, Fermi, Bohr, Lawrence, Bethe, Rabi, Szilard, and Compton-brilliant men who believed in science and who saw before anyone else did the awesome workings of an invisible world. They came from many places, some fleeing Nazism in Europe, others quietly slipping out of university teaching jobs, all gathering in secret wartime laboratories to create the world's first atomic bomb. At one such place hidden away in the mountains of northern New Mexico-Los Alamos-they would crack the secret of the nuclear chain reaction and construct a device that incinerated a city and melted its victims so thoroughly that the only thing left was their scorched outlines on the sidewalks. During the war, few of the atomic scientists questioned the wisdom of their desperate endeavor. But afterward, they were forced to deal with the sobering legacy of their creation. Some were haunted by the dead of Hiroshima and Nagasaki and would become anti-nuclear weapons activists; others would go on to build bigger and even deadlier bombs. Some would remain friends; others would become bitter rivals and enemies. In explaining their lives and their struggles, Brian VanDeMark superbly illuminates the ways in which these brilliant and sensitive men came to terms with their horrific creation. The result is spectacular history and a moral investigation of the highest order.

The Atomic Bomb: A History Just For Kids!

Author: KidCaps

Publisher: BookCaps Study Guides

ISBN: 1621075796

Category: Juvenile Nonfiction

Page: 60

View: 7702

Now, from time to time you might hear the term “nuclear bomb” used, while other times you may hear the term “atomic bomb”. What is the difference? Any bomb that uses tiny reactions inside the nucleus of a microscopic atom is, by definition, a “nuclear bomb”. However, the first nuclear bombs were much simpler than today’s bombs, which use multiple steps to produce their large explosions. The first nuclear bombs that were produced relied only on this special microscopic reaction in the atom and so are called “atomic bombs”; and it is this kind that we will be talking about. Find out about this exciting and complex period of time in this kid's book.

Diet for the Atomic Age

How to Protect Yourself from Low-Level Radiation

Author: Sara Shannon

Publisher: N.A

ISBN: 9780941683265

Category: Herbs

Page: 320

View: 7789

Treatments to try out. Burns and scalds. Cuts, scratches and grazes. Colds, Catarrh.

The Dragon's Tail

Americans Face the Atomic Age

Author: Robert A. Jacobs

Publisher: Univ of Massachusetts Press

ISBN: 9781558497276

Category: History

Page: 151

View: 3231

When President Harry Truman introduced the atomic bomb to the world in 1945, he described it as a God-given harnessing of "the basic power of the universe." Six days later a New York Times editorial framed the dilemma of the new Atomic Age for its readers: "Here the long pilgrimage of man on Earth turns towards darkness or towards light." American nuclear scientists, aware of the dangers their work involved, referred to one of their most critical experiments as "tickling the dragon's tail." Even after Hiroshima and Nagasaki, most Americans may not have been sure what an atomic bomb was or how it worked. But they did sense that it had fundamentally changed the future of the human race. In this book, Robert Jacobs analyzes the early impact of nuclear weapons on American culture and society. He does so by examining a broad range of stories, or "nuclear narratives," that sought to come to grips with the implications of the bomb's unprecedented and almost unimaginable power. Beginning with what he calls the "primary nuclear narrative," which depicted atomic power as a critical agent of social change that would either destroy the world or transform it for the better, Jacobs explores a variety of common themes and images related to the destructive power of the bomb, the effects of radiation, and ways of surviving nuclear war. He looks at civil defense pamphlets, magazines, novels, and films to recover the stories the U.S. government told its citizens and soldiers as well as those presented in popular culture. According to Jacobs, this early period of Cold War nuclear culture--from 1945 to the banning of above-ground testing in 1963--was distinctive for two reasons: not only did atmospheric testing make Americans keenly aware of the presence of nuclear weapons in their lives, but radioactive fallout from the tests also made these weapons a serious threat to public health, separate from yet directly linked to the danger of nuclear war.

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