Search Results: the-atomic-age-opens

The Atomic Age Opens

Author: Gerald Wendt,Donald Porter Geddes

Publisher: N.A

ISBN: N.A

Category: Atomic bomb

Page: 251

View: 2616

The Making of the Atomic Bomb

Author: Richard Rhodes

Publisher: Simon and Schuster

ISBN: 9781439126226

Category: History

Page: 928

View: 5832

Twenty-five years after its initial publication, The Making of the Atomic Bomb remains the definitive history of nuclear weapons and the Manhattan Project. From the turn-of-the-century discovery of nuclear energy to the dropping of the first bombs on Japan, Richard Rhodes’s Pulitzer Prize-winning book details the science, the people, and the socio-political realities that led to the development of the atomic bomb. This sweeping account begins in the 19th century, with the discovery of nuclear fission, and continues to World War Two and the Americans’ race to beat Hitler’s Nazis. That competition launched the Manhattan Project and the nearly overnight construction of a vast military-industrial complex that culminated in the fateful dropping of the first bombs on Hiroshima and Nagasaki. Reading like a character-driven suspense novel, the book introduces the players in this saga of physics, politics, and human psychology—from FDR and Einstein to the visionary scientists who pioneered quantum theory and the application of thermonuclear fission, including Planck, Szilard, Bohr, Oppenheimer, Fermi, Teller, Meitner, von Neumann, and Lawrence. From nuclear power’s earliest foreshadowing in the work of H.G. Wells to the bright glare of Trinity at Alamogordo and the arms race of the Cold War, this dread invention forever changed the course of human history, and The Making of The Atomic Bomb provides a panoramic backdrop for that story. Richard Rhodes’s ability to craft compelling biographical portraits is matched only by his rigorous scholarship. Told in rich human, political, and scientific detail that any reader can follow, The Making of the Atomic Bomb is a thought-provoking and masterful work.

The Making of the Atomic Age

Author: Alwyn McKay

Publisher: Oxford University Press, USA

ISBN: N.A

Category: Atomic bomb

Page: 153

View: 3288

By the Bomb's Early Light

American Thought and Culture At the Dawn of the Atomic Age

Author: Paul Boyer

Publisher: Univ of North Carolina Press

ISBN: 0807875708

Category: History

Page: 464

View: 6476

Originally published in 1985, By the Bomb's Early Light is the first book to explore the cultural 'fallout' in America during the early years of the atomic age. Paul Boyer argues that the major aspects of the long-running debates about nuclear armament and disarmament developed and took shape soon after the bombing of Hiroshima. The book is based on a wide range of sources, including cartoons, opinion polls, radio programs, movies, literature, song lyrics, slang, and interviews with leading opinion-makers of the time. Through these materials, Boyer shows the surprising and profoundly disturbing ways in which the bomb quickly and totally penetrated the fabric of American life, from the chillingly prophetic forecasts of observers like Lewis Mumford to the Hollywood starlet who launched her career as the 'anatomic bomb.' In a new preface, Boyer discusses recent changes in nuclear politics and attitudes toward the nuclear age.

The Age of Radiance

The Epic Rise and Dramatic Fall of the Atomic Era

Author: Craig Nelson

Publisher: Simon and Schuster

ISBN: 145166043X

Category: History

Page: 448

View: 8556

A narrative of the Atomic Age by the award-winning author of Rocket Man explores the complexities of nuclear energy, citing the contributions of such individuals as Marie Curie, Albert Einstein and Robert Oppenheimer while sharing lesser-known historical details.

The Dragon's Tail

Americans Face the Atomic Age

Author: Robert A. Jacobs

Publisher: Univ of Massachusetts Press

ISBN: 9781558497276

Category: History

Page: 151

View: 1241

When President Harry Truman introduced the atomic bomb to the world in 1945, he described it as a God-given harnessing of "the basic power of the universe." Six days later a New York Times editorial framed the dilemma of the new Atomic Age for its readers: "Here the long pilgrimage of man on Earth turns towards darkness or towards light." American nuclear scientists, aware of the dangers their work involved, referred to one of their most critical experiments as "tickling the dragon's tail." Even after Hiroshima and Nagasaki, most Americans may not have been sure what an atomic bomb was or how it worked. But they did sense that it had fundamentally changed the future of the human race. In this book, Robert Jacobs analyzes the early impact of nuclear weapons on American culture and society. He does so by examining a broad range of stories, or "nuclear narratives," that sought to come to grips with the implications of the bomb's unprecedented and almost unimaginable power. Beginning with what he calls the "primary nuclear narrative," which depicted atomic power as a critical agent of social change that would either destroy the world or transform it for the better, Jacobs explores a variety of common themes and images related to the destructive power of the bomb, the effects of radiation, and ways of surviving nuclear war. He looks at civil defense pamphlets, magazines, novels, and films to recover the stories the U.S. government told its citizens and soldiers as well as those presented in popular culture. According to Jacobs, this early period of Cold War nuclear culture--from 1945 to the banning of above-ground testing in 1963--was distinctive for two reasons: not only did atmospheric testing make Americans keenly aware of the presence of nuclear weapons in their lives, but radioactive fallout from the tests also made these weapons a serious threat to public health, separate from yet directly linked to the danger of nuclear war.

Adventures in the Atomic Age

From Watts to Washington

Author: Glenn Theodore Seaborg,Eric Seaborg

Publisher: Farrar Straus & Giroux

ISBN: 9780374299910

Category: Biography & Autobiography

Page: 312

View: 4473

The renowned physicist describes his Nobel Prize-winning career, his work with the Manhattan Project, his discovery of the element that makes atomic bombs explode, and his term as chairman of the Atomic Energy Commission.

The Writing on the Cloud

American Culture Confronts the Atomic Bomb

Author: Alison M. Scott,Christopher D. Geist

Publisher: University Press of Amer

ISBN: 9780761807469

Category: History

Page: 241

View: 3658

This book is a path-breaking collection of essays which explore the diverse and complex ways American culture has been shaped by the looming presence of the atomic bomb, the central icon of technology, diplomacy, and war, of the second half of the twentieth century. These essays were originally presented as papers at a 1995 conference at Bowling Green State University commemorating the fiftieth anniversary of the Bomb; this collection is unusual in the range of subjects addressed, which range from abstract expressionism and modernist poetry to television sitcoms and advertisements for lipstick and appliances. The papers fall into four general areas of investigation and interpretation: the analysis of widespread cultural issues or social movements; the examination of particular cultural artifacts; the explorations of aspects of political, diplomatic, or military history; and recollections or interpretations of personal experience. Contents: The Consequences of the Atomic Bomb: The End of the Soviet Union and the Beginning of Environmental Hysteria, Edward Teller; Bert the Turtle Meets Doctor Spock: Parenting in Atomic Age America, Daniel Gomes; Commercial Fallout: The Image of Progress and the Feminine Consumer in the Atomic Age (1945-1962), John Gregory Stocke; From the Missile Gap to the Culture Gap: Modernism in the Fallout from Sputnik, David Howard; Detonating on Canvas: The Abstract Bomb in American Art, Richard Martin; SANE and Beyond Sane: Poets and the H-Bomb, 1958-1960, Daniel Belgrad; From Science to Science Fiction: Leo Szilard and Fictional Persuasion, Michael L. Lewis; Sh-Boom or, How Early Rock & Roll Taught Us to Stop Worrying and Love the Bomb, Richard Aquila; 'Are You Ready for the Great Atomic Power?' Music and Protest, 1945-1960, Joseph C. Ruff; Stories Told by Godzilla and Rodan, Helen Schwartz; The Berlin Crisis, the Bomb Shelter Craze and Bizarre Television: Expressions of an Atomic Age Counterculture in the Early 1960s, Margot A. Henricksen; Peace on Earth Without Goodwill Toward Men: Nuclear Weapons & American Millenarian Aspirations, Ron Hirschbein; Hiroshima and Nagasaki: Memory (and Forgetting) in the Religious Press, Leo Maley, III; Hiroshima in America: Fifty Years of Denial, Robert Jay Lifton; Appendix: Conference Program, 'The Atomic Age Opens: American Culture Confronts the Atomic Bomb'; Index; About the Contributors.

A Message from God in the Atomic Age

Author: Irene Vilar

Publisher: Pantheon

ISBN: N.A

Category: Biography & Autobiography

Page: 324

View: 8234

The author meditates on the allure of suicide for three generations of women in one Puerto Rican family, describing the lives of her grandmother and mother, her own suicide attempt, and the secrets that linked the three women

The Atomic Bomb: A History Just For Kids!

Author: KidCaps

Publisher: BookCaps Study Guides

ISBN: 1621075796

Category: Juvenile Nonfiction

Page: 60

View: 6793

Now, from time to time you might hear the term “nuclear bomb” used, while other times you may hear the term “atomic bomb”. What is the difference? Any bomb that uses tiny reactions inside the nucleus of a microscopic atom is, by definition, a “nuclear bomb”. However, the first nuclear bombs were much simpler than today’s bombs, which use multiple steps to produce their large explosions. The first nuclear bombs that were produced relied only on this special microscopic reaction in the atom and so are called “atomic bombs”; and it is this kind that we will be talking about. Find out about this exciting and complex period of time in this kid's book.

Atomic culture

how we learned to stop worrying and love the bomb

Author: Scott C. Zeman,Michael A. Amundson

Publisher: Univ Pr of Colorado

ISBN: N.A

Category: History

Page: 187

View: 4200

Eight scholars examine the range of cultural expressions of atomic energy from the 1940s to the early twenty-first century, including comic books, nuclear landscapes, mushroom-cloud postcards, the Los Alamos suburbs, uranium-themed board games, future atomic waste facilities, and atomic-themed films such as 'Dr. Strangelove' and 'The Atomic Kid'. Despite the growing interest in atomic culture and history, the body of relevant scholarship is relatively sparse. "Atomic Culture" opens new doors into the field by providing a substantive, engaging, and historically based consideration of the topic that will appeal to students and scholars of the Atomic Age as well as general readers.

Dr. Strangelove's America

Society and Culture in the Atomic Age

Author: Margot Ann Henriksen

Publisher: N.A

ISBN: N.A

Category:

Page: 1248

View: 9237

Film and the Nuclear Age

Representing Cultural Anxiety

Author: Toni A. Perrine

Publisher: Taylor & Francis

ISBN: 9780815329329

Category: History

Page: 287

View: 1925

This volume traces the modern critical and performance history of this play, one of Shakespeare's most-loved and most-performed comedies. The essay focus on such modern concerns as feminism, deconstruction, textual theory, and queer theory.

Desiring the Bomb

Communication, Psychoanalysis, and the Atomic Age

Author: Calum Lister Matheson

Publisher: University Alabama Press

ISBN: 0817319980

Category: Language Arts & Disciplines

Page: 184

View: 1920

A timely interdisciplinary study that applies psychoanalysis and the rhetorical tradition of the sublime to examine the cultural aftermath of the Atomic Age Every culture throughout history has obsessed over various “end of the world” scenarios. The dawn of the Atomic Age marked a new twist in this tale. For the first time, our species became aware of its capacity to deliberately destroy itself. Since that time the Bomb has served as an organizing metaphor, a symbol of human annihilation, a stand-in for the unspeakable void of extinction, and a discursive construct that challenges the limits of communication itself. The parallel fascination with and abhorrence of nuclear weapons has metastasized into a host of other end-of-the-world scenarios, from global pandemics and climate change to zombie uprisings and asteroid collisions. Desiring the Bomb: Communication, Psychoanalysis, and the Atomic Age explores these world-ending fantasies through the lens of psychoanalysis to reveal their implications for both contemporary apocalyptic culture and the operations of language itself. What accounts for the enduring power of the Bomb as a symbol? What does the prospect of annihilation suggest about language and its limits? Thoroughly researched and accessibly written, this study expands on the theories of Kenneth Burke, Jacques Lacan, Sigmund Freud, and many others from a variety of disciplines to arrive at some answers to these questions. Calum L. Matheson undertakes a series of case studies—including the Trinity test site, nuclear war games, urban shelter schemes, and contemporary survivalism—and argues that contending with the anxieties (individual, social, cultural, and political) born of the Atomic Age depends on rhetorical conceptions of the “real,” an order of experience that cannot be easily negotiated in language. Using aspects of media studies, rhetorical theory, and psychoanalysis, the author deftly engages the topics of Atomic Age survival, extinction, religion, and fantasy, along with their enduring cultural legacies, to develop an account of the Bomb as a signifier and to explore why some Americans have become fascinated with fantasies of nuclear warfare and narratives of postapocalyptic rebirth.

Invisible Colors

The Arts of the Atomic Age

Author: Gabrielle Decamous

Publisher: Leonardo Book

ISBN: 9780262038546

Category: Art

Page: 424

View: 1961

How art makes visible what had been invisible--the effects of radiation, the lives of atomic bomb survivors, and the politics of the atomic age. The effects of radiation are invisible, but art can make it and its effects visible. Artwork created in response to the events of the nuclear era allow us to see them in a different way. In Invisible Colors, Gabrielle Decamous explores the atomic age from the perspective of the arts, investigating atomic-related art inspired by the work of Marie Curie, the bombings of Hiroshima and Nagasaki, the disaster at Fukushima, and other episodes in nuclear history. Decamous looks at the "Radium Literature" based on the work and life of Marie Curie; "A-Bomb literature" by Hibakusha (bomb survivor) artists from Nagasaki and Hiroshima; responses to the bombings by Western artists and writers; art from the irradiated landscapes of the Cold War--nuclear test sites and uranium mines, mainly in the Pacific and some African nations; and nuclear accidents in Fukushima, Chernobyl, and Three Mile Island. She finds that the artistic voices of the East are often drowned out by those of the West. Hibakusha art and Japanese photographs of the bombing are little known in the West and were censored; poetry from the Marshall Islands and Moruroa is also largely unknown; Western theatrical and cinematic works focus on heroic scientists, military men, and the atomic mushroom cloud rather than the aftermath of the bombings. Emphasizing art by artists who were present at these nuclear events--the "global Hibakusha"--rather than those reacting at a distance, Decamous puts Eastern and Western art in dialogue, analyzing the aesthetics and the ethics of nuclear representation.

By the Bomb's Early Light

American Thought and Culture At the Dawn of the Atomic Age

Author: Paul Boyer

Publisher: Univ of North Carolina Press

ISBN: 0807875708

Category: History

Page: 464

View: 6926

Originally published in 1985, By the Bomb's Early Light is the first book to explore the cultural 'fallout' in America during the early years of the atomic age. Paul Boyer argues that the major aspects of the long-running debates about nuclear armament and disarmament developed and took shape soon after the bombing of Hiroshima. The book is based on a wide range of sources, including cartoons, opinion polls, radio programs, movies, literature, song lyrics, slang, and interviews with leading opinion-makers of the time. Through these materials, Boyer shows the surprising and profoundly disturbing ways in which the bomb quickly and totally penetrated the fabric of American life, from the chillingly prophetic forecasts of observers like Lewis Mumford to the Hollywood starlet who launched her career as the 'anatomic bomb.' In a new preface, Boyer discusses recent changes in nuclear politics and attitudes toward the nuclear age.

Diet for the Atomic Age

How to Protect Yourself from Low-Level Radiation

Author: Sara Shannon

Publisher: N.A

ISBN: 9780941683265

Category: Herbs

Page: 320

View: 2628

Treatments to try out. Burns and scalds. Cuts, scratches and grazes. Colds, Catarrh.

The Girls of Atomic City

The Untold Story of the Women Who Helped Win World War II

Author: Denise Kiernan

Publisher: Simon and Schuster

ISBN: 1451617542

Category: Biography & Autobiography

Page: 400

View: 9350

THE GIRLS OF ATOMIC C ITY AT THE HEIGHT OF WORLD WAR II, Oak Ridge, Tennessee, was home to 75,000 residents, consuming more electricity than New York City. But to most of the world, the town did not exist. Thousands of civilians—many of them young women from small towns across the South—were recruited to this secret city, enticed by solid wages and the promise of war-ending work. Kept very much in the dark, few would ever guess the true nature of the tasks they performed each day in the hulking factories in the middle of the Appalachian Mountains. That is, until the end of the war—when Oak Ridge’s secret was revealed. Drawing on the voices of the women who lived it—women who are now in their eighties and nineties— The Girls of Atomic City rescues a remarkable, forgotten chapter of American history from obscurity. Denise Kiernan captures the spirit of the times through these women: their pluck, their desire to contribute, and their enduring courage. Combining the grand-scale human drama of The Worst Hard Time with the intimate biography and often troubling science of The Immortal Life of Henrietta Lacks, The Girls of Atomic City is a lasting and important addition to our country’s history.

A Hero for the Atomic Age

Thor Heyerdahl and the Kon-Tiki Expedition

Author: Axel Andersson

Publisher: Peter Lang

ISBN: 9781906165314

Category: History

Page: 252

View: 9928

Nomination for Best Foreign Film at the 2013 Academy Awards In English and many other languages the name 'Kon-Tiki' has become a byword for adventure and the exotic. The journey of the Kon-Tiki from Peru to Polynesia in 1947 became one of the founding myths of the postwar world. In the voyage of six Scandinavians and a parrot on a balsa raft across the Pacific Ocean the classic journey of discovery was re-invented for generations to come. Kon-Tiki spoke of heroism, masculinity, free-spirited rebellion against scientific dogmatism, and the promise of an attainable exotic world, while it updated these mythological staples to fit the times. After years of relentless media exploitation of the 101-day raft journey, Heyerdahl emerged as the protagonist in a legend that helped to create a new postwar West. A Hero for the Atomic Age tells the story of how Heyerdahl organized an expedition to sail a balsa raft from Callao in Peru to the Tuamotu Islands in French Polynesia, and explains how he turned this physical crossing into an epic narrative that became imbued with a universal appeal. The book also addresses, for the first time, the problematic nature of Heyerdahl's theory that a white culture-bearing race had initiated all the world's great civilizations.

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