Search Results: the-chief-the-life-of-william-randolph-hearst

The Chief

The Life of William Randolph Hearst

Author: David Nasaw

Publisher: Houghton Mifflin Harcourt

ISBN: 0547524722

Category: Biography & Autobiography

Page: 704

View: 3881

David Nasaw's magnificent, definitive biography of William Randolph Hearst is based on newly released private and business papers and interviews. For the first time, documentation of Hearst's interactions with Hitler, Mussolini, Churchill, and every American president from Grover Cleveland to Franklin Roosevelt, as well as with movie giants Louis B. Mayer, Jack Warner, and Irving Thalberg, completes the picture of this colossal American. Hearst, known to his staff as the Chief, was a man of prodigious appetites. By the 1930s, he controlled the largest publishing empire in the country, including twenty-eight newspapers, the Cosmopolitan Picture Studio, radio stations, and thirteen magazines. As the first practitioner of what is now known as synergy, Hearst used his media stronghold to achieve political power unprecedented in the industry. Americans followed his metamorphosis from populist to fierce opponent of Roosevelt and the New Deal, from citizen to congressman, and we are still fascinated today by the man characterized in the film classic CITIZEN KANE. In Nasaw's portrait, questions about Hearst's relationships are addressed, including those about his mistress in his Harvard days, who lived with him for ten years; his legal wife, Millicent, a former showgirl and the mother of his five sons; and Marion Davies, his companion until death. Recently discovered correspondence with the architect of Hearst's world-famous estate, San Simeon, is augmented by taped interviews with the people who worked there and witnessed Hearst's extravagant entertaining, shedding light on the private life of a very public man.

William Randolph Hearst

Newspaper Magnate

Author: Bonnie Goldsmith

Publisher: ABDO

ISBN: 9781604539172

Category: Juvenile Nonfiction

Page: 112

View: 5564

Examines the remarkable life of William Randolph Hearst and the building of his newspaper legacy.

The Uncrowned King

The Sensational Rise of William Randolph Hearst

Author: Kenneth Whyte

Publisher: Vintage Canada

ISBN: 0307372936

Category: History

Page: 560

View: 5590

“I’ve been watching him, and I notice that when he wants cake, he wants cake; and he wants it now. And I notice that after a while he gets his cake.” –Senator George Hearst, on his son, William Randolph Hearst A lively, unexpected and impeccably researched piece of popular history, The Uncrowned King reveals how an unheralded young newspaperman from San Francisco walked into the media capital of the world and created the most successful daily of his time, pushing the medium to an unprecedented level of excitement and influence, and leading serious observers to wonder if newspapers might be “the greatest force in civilization,” more powerful even than kings and popes and presidents.

Die Welt, wie wir sie kannten (Die letzten Überlebenden 1)

Author: Susan Beth Pfeffer

Publisher: CARLSEN Verlag

ISBN: 3646920092

Category: Juvenile Fiction

Page: 412

View: 5212

Was zählt, wenn jeder Tag der letzte sein könnte? Was, wenn die Welt über Nacht nicht mehr so ist, wie wir sie kannten? Gespannt verfolgt Miranda zusammen mit ihrer Familie und der ganzen Straße, wie ein Asteroid auf dem Mond einschlägt. Doch dann verläuft der Abend ganz anders als erwartet: Der Mond wird aus seiner Umlaufbahn geworfen und nichts ist mehr, wie es war. Über Nacht gerät die Welt aus den Fugen; Flutkatastrophen, Erdbeben und extreme Wetterumschwünge bedrohen die gesamte Zivilisation. Und Miranda und ihre Familie müssen lernen, dass bei großen Katastrophen gerade die kleinen Dinge zählen: Feuerholz, Klopapier, eine Dose Bohnen, Aspirin. Und dass sie alle zusammen sind.

Hearst Over Hollywood

Power, Passion, and Propaganda in the Movies

Author: Louis Pizzitola

Publisher: Columbia University Press

ISBN: 0231507550

Category: Performing Arts

Page: 540

View: 595

Hollywood—crossroads of filmmaking, mythmaking, and politics—was dominated by one man more than any other for most of its history. It was William Randolph Hearst who understood how to use cinema to exploit the public's desire for entertainment and to create film propaganda to further his own desire for power. From the start, Hearst saw his future and the future of Hollywood as one and the same. He pioneered and capitalized on the synergistic relationship between yellow journalism and advertising and motion pictures. He sent movie cameramen to the inauguration of William McKinley and the front lines of the Spanish-American War. He played a prominent role in organizing film propaganda for both sides fighting World War I. By the 1910s, Hearst was producing his own pictures—he ran one of the first animation studios and made many popular and controversial movie serials, including The Perils of Pauline (creating both the scenario and the catchphrase title) and Patria. As a feature film producer, Hearst was responsible for some of the most talked-about movies of the 1920s and 1930s. Behind the scenes in Hollywood, Hearst had few equals—he was a much-feared power broker from the Silent Era to the Blacklisting Era. Hearst Over Hollywood draws on hundreds of previously unpublished letters and memos, FBI Freedom of Information files, and personal interviews to document the scope of Hearst's power in Hollywood. Louis Pizzitola tells the hidden story of Hearst's shaping influence on both film publicity and film censorship—getting the word out and keeping it in check—as well as the growth of the "talkies," and the studio system. He details Hearst's anti-Semitism and anti-Communism, used to retaliate for Citizen Kane and to maintain dominance in the film industry, and exposes his secret film deal with Germany on the eve of World War II. The author also presents new insights into Hearst's relationships with Marion Davies, Will Hays, Louis B. Mayer, Franklin D. Roosevelt, Mussolini, Hitler, and the Kennedys. Hearst Over Hollywood is a tour de force of biography, cultural study, and film history that reveals as never before the brilliance and darkness of Hearst's prophetic connection with Hollywood.

CBS’s Don Hollenbeck

An Honest Reporter in the Age of McCarthyism

Author: Loren Ghiglione

Publisher: Columbia University Press

ISBN: 0231516894

Category: Performing Arts

Page: 352

View: 2599

Loren Ghiglione recounts the fascinating life and tragic suicide of Don Hollenbeck, the controversial newscaster who became a primary target of McCarthyism's smear tactics. Drawing on unsealed FBI records, private family correspondence, and interviews with Walter Cronkite, Mike Wallace, Charles Collingwood, Douglas Edwards, and more than one hundred other journalists, Ghiglione writes a balanced biography that cuts close to the bone of this complicated newsman and chronicles the stark consequences of the anti-Communist frenzy that seized America in the late 1940s and 1950s. Hollenbeck began his career at the Lincoln, Nebraska Journal (marrying the boss's daughter) before becoming an editor at William Randolph Hearst's rip-roaring Omaha Bee-News. He participated in the emerging field of photojournalism at the Associated Press; assisted in creating the innovative, ad-free PM newspaper in New York City; reported from the European theater for NBC radio during World War II; and anchored television newscasts at CBS during the era of Edward R. Murrow. Hollenbeck's pioneering, prize-winning radio program, CBS Views the Press (1947-1950), was a declaration of independence from a print medium that had dominated American newsmaking for close to 250 years. The program candidly criticized the prestigious New York Times, the Daily News (then the paper with the largest circulation in America), and Hearst's flagship Journal-American and popular morning tabloid Daily Mirror. For this honest work, Hollenbeck was attacked by conservative anti-Communists, especially Hearst columnist Jack O'Brian, and in 1954, plagued by depression, alcoholism, three failed marriages, and two network firings (and worried about a third), Hollenbeck took his own life. In his investigation of this amazing American character, Ghiglione reveals the workings of an industry that continues to fall victim to censorship and political manipulation. Separating myth from fact, CBS's Don Hollenbeck is the definitive portrait of a polarizing figure who became a symbol of America's tortured conscience.

The Rose Man of Sing Sing

A True Tale of Life, Murder, and Redemption in the Age of Yellow Journalism

Author: James M. Morris

Publisher: Fordham University Press

ISBN: 0823222667

Category: Biography & Autobiography

Page: 470

View: 1733

Today, seventy-three years after his death, journalists still tell tales of Charles E. Chapin. As city editor of Pulitzer's New York Evening World , Chapin was the model of the take-no-prisoners newsroom tyrant: he drove reporters relentlessly-and kept his paper in the center ring of the circus of big-city journalism. From the Harry K. Thaw trial to the sinking of the Titanic , Chapin set the pace for the evening press, the CNN of the pre-electronic world of journalism. In 1918, at the pinnacle of fame, Chapin's world collapsed. Facing financial ruin, sunk in depression, he decided to kill himself and his beloved wife Nellie. On a quiet September morning, he took not his own life, but Nellie's, shooting her as she slept. After his trial-and one hell of a story for the World's competitors-he was sentenced to life in the infamous Sing Sing Prison in Ossining, New York. In this story of an extraordinary life set in the most thrilling epoch of American journalism, James McGrath Morris tracks Chapin's rise from legendary Chicago street reporter to celebrity powerbroker in media-mad New York. His was a human tragedy played out in the sensational stories of tabloids and broadsheets. But it's also an epic of redemption: in prison, Chapin started a newspaper to fight for prisoner rights, wrote a best-selling autobiography, had two long-distance love affairs, and tapped his prodigious talents to transform barren prison plots into world-famous rose gardens before dying peacefully in his cell in 1930. The first portrait of one of the founding figures of modern American journalism, and a vibrant chronicle of the cutthroat culture of scoops and scandals, The Rose Man of Sing Sing is also a hidden history of New York at its most colorful and passionate.James McGrath Morris is a former journalist, author of Jailhouse Journalism: The Fourth Estate Behind Bars , and a historian. He lives in Falls Church, Virginia, and teaches at West Springfield High School.

Hollywood Left and Right

How Movie Stars Shaped American Politics

Author: Steven J. Ross

Publisher: Oxford University Press

ISBN: 0199911436

Category: History

Page: 512

View: 7514

In Hollywood Left and Right, Steven J. Ross tells a story that has escaped public attention: the emergence of Hollywood as a vital center of political life and the important role that movie stars have played in shaping the course of American politics. Ever since the film industry relocated to Hollywood early in the twentieth century, it has had an outsized influence on American politics. Through compelling larger-than-life figures in American cinema--Charlie Chaplin, Louis B. Mayer, Edward G. Robinson, George Murphy, Ronald Reagan, Harry Belafonte, Jane Fonda, Charlton Heston, Warren Beatty, and Arnold Schwarzenegger--Hollywood Left and Right reveals how the film industry's engagement in politics has been longer, deeper, and more varied than most people would imagine. As shown in alternating chapters, the Left and the Right each gained ascendancy in Tinseltown at different times. From Chaplin, whose movies almost always displayed his leftist convictions, to Schwarzenegger's nearly seamless transition from action blockbusters to the California governor's mansion, Steven J. Ross traces the intersection of Hollywood and political activism from the early twentieth century to the present. Hollywood Left and Right challenges the commonly held belief that Hollywood has always been a bastion of liberalism. The real story, as Ross shows in this passionate and entertaining work, is far more complicated. First, Hollywood has a longer history of conservatism than liberalism. Second, and most surprising, while the Hollywood Left was usually more vocal and visible, the Right had a greater impact on American political life, capturing a senate seat (Murphy), a governorship (Schwarzenegger), and the ultimate achievement, the Presidency (Reagan).

The Motel 6 Chronicles-1st Print Edition

1 Lost Dog, 2 Lost Souls, 3 Journeys Home

Author: P. Dean Coker,Valerie Maxine Schneider

Publisher: Paul Dean Coker

ISBN: 1886178054

Category:

Page: N.A

View: 9787

Travel the Southern California coastline from San Diego to Santa Cruz with Leo, a man on a mission, and "Little Mike", his unintentional canine companion. Enjoy the wondrous beaches, quiet coves and a tale crafted so cleverly you'll reach for your car keys to meet them in San Simeon. What people are saying, "...the story has all the great things you want in a book...mystery, romance, lost souls being found, interesting characters, happy ending, the acknowledgement of what differences pets make in our lives." Dr. Dawn Ziegler, DVM, CAC, San Diego, California

I Have Seen the Future

A Life of Lincoln Steffens

Author: Peter Hartshorn

Publisher: Catapult

ISBN: 158243882X

Category: Biography & Autobiography

Page: 546

View: 3870

“A fascinating history of the age when magazine writers steered national opinion . . . This is an extraordinary book about a complex man.” —American Journalism Review At the dawn of the twentieth century, Lincoln Steffens, an internationally known and respected political insider, went rogue to work for McClure’s Magazine. Credited as the proverbial father of muckraking reporting, Steffens quickly rose to the top of McClure’s team of investigative journalists, earning him the attention of many powerful politicians who utilized his knack for tireless probing to battle government corruption and greedy politicians. A mentor of Walter Lippmann, friend of Theodore Roosevelt, and advisor of Woodrow Wilson, Steffens is best known for bringing to light the Mexican Revolution, the 1910 bombing of the Los Angeles Times, and the Versailles peace talks. Now, with print journalism and investigative reporters on the decline, Lincoln Steffens’ biography serves as a necessary call to arms for the newspaper industry. Hartshorn’s extensive research captures each detail of Steffens’ life—from his private letters to friends to his long and colorful career—and delves into the ongoing internal struggle between his personal life and his overpowering devotion to the “cause.” “Absorbing . . . [Hartshorn] has produced a biography that is prodigiously researched, fantastically interesting, and extremely well-written. Steffens would have been pleased by how well Hartshorn has turned him inside out.” —The New York Times “Well-researched and well-written.” —The Wall Street Journal “Outstanding . . . those concerned about freedom of the press and the role of investigative journalism will take comfort in Steffens’s legacy as artfully told here.” —Library Journal, starred review

William Randolph Hearst

The Later Years, 1911-1951

Author: Ben Procter

Publisher: Oxford University Press

ISBN: 9780199717101

Category: History

Page: 352

View: 8025

William Randolph Hearst was a figure of Shakespearean proportions, a man of huge ambition, inflexible will, and inexhaustible energy. He revolutionized the newspaper industry in America, becoming the most powerful media mogul the world had ever seen, and in the process earned himself the title of "most hated man in America" on four different occasions. Now in the second volume of this sweeping biography, Ben Procter gives readers a vivid portrait of the final 40 years of Hearst's life. Drawing on previously unavailable letters and manuscripts, and quoting generously from Hearst's own editorials, Procter covers all aspects of Hearst's career: his journalistic innovations, his impassioned patriotism, his fierce belief in "Government by Newspaper," his frustrated political aspirations, profligate spending and voracious art collecting, the building of his castle at San Simeon, and his tumultuous Hollywood years. The book offers new insight into Hearst's bitter and highly public quarrels with Al Smith (who referred to Hearst papers as "Mudgutter Gazettes") and FDR (whose New Deal Hearst dubbed the "Raw Deal"); his 30-year affair with the actress Marion Davies (and her own affairs with others); his political evolution from a progressive trust-buster and "America first" isolationist to an increasingly conservative and at times hysterical anti-communist. Procter also explores Hearst's ill-considered meeting with Hitler, his attempts to suppress "Citizen Kane," and his relationships with Joseph Kennedy, Charles Lindbergh, Louis B. Meyer, and many other major figures of his time. As Life magazine noted, Hearst newspapers were a "one-man fireworks display"--sensational, controversial, informative, and always entertaining. In Ben Procter's fascinating biography, Hearst shines forth in all his eccentric and egocentric glory.

The Entertainer

Movies, Magic, and My Father's Twentieth Century

Author: Margaret Talbot

Publisher: Penguin

ISBN: 1101597054

Category: Biography & Autobiography

Page: 432

View: 473

Using the life and career of her father, an early Hollywood actor, New Yorker writer Margaret Talbot tells the thrilling story of the rise of popular culture through a transfixing personal lens. The arc of Lyle Talbot’s career is in fact the story of American entertainment. Born in 1902, Lyle left his home in small-town Nebraska in 1918 to join a traveling carnival. From there he became a magician’s assistant, an actor in a traveling theater troupe, a romantic lead in early talkies, then an actor in major Warner Bros. pictures with stars such as Humphrey Bogart and Carole Lombard, then an actor in cult B movies, and finally a part of the advent of television, with regular roles on The Adventures of Ozzie and Harriet and Leave It to Beaver. Ultimately, his career spanned the entire trajectory of the industry. In her captivating, impeccably researched narrative—a charmed combination of Hollywood history, social history, and family memoir—Margaret Talbot conjures warmth and nostalgia for those earlier eras of ’10s and ’20s small-town America, ’30s and ’40s Hollywood. She transports us to an alluring time, simpler but also exciting, and illustrates the changing face of her father’s America, all while telling the story of mass entertainment across the first half of the twentieth century.

Dictators, Democracy, and American Public Culture

Envisioning the Totalitarian Enemy, 1920s-1950s

Author: Benjamin L. Alpers

Publisher: Univ of North Carolina Press

ISBN: 0807861227

Category: History

Page: 416

View: 5901

Focusing on portrayals of Mussolini's Italy, Hitler's Germany, and Stalin's Russia in U.S. films, magazine and newspaper articles, books, plays, speeches, and other texts, Benjamin Alpers traces changing American understandings of dictatorship from the late 1920s through the early years of the Cold War. During the early 1930s, most Americans' conception of dictatorship focused on the dictator. Whether viewed as heroic or horrific, the dictator was represented as a figure of great, masculine power and effectiveness. As the Great Depression gripped the United States, a few people--including conservative members of the press and some Hollywood filmmakers--even dared to suggest that dictatorship might be the answer to America's social problems. In the late 1930s, American explanations of dictatorship shifted focus from individual leaders to the movements that empowered them. Totalitarianism became the image against which a view of democracy emphasizing tolerance and pluralism and disparaging mass movements developed. First used to describe dictatorships of both right and left, the term "totalitarianism" fell out of use upon the U.S. entry into World War II. With the war's end and the collapse of the U.S.-Soviet alliance, however, concerns about totalitarianism lay the foundation for the emerging Cold War.

Ragtime

Roman

Author: Edgar L. Doctorow

Publisher: N.A

ISBN: 9783462043198

Category:

Page: 333

View: 5350

The Year That Defined American Journalism

1897 and the Clash of Paradigms

Author: W. Joseph Campbell

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 1135205043

Category: Language Arts & Disciplines

Page: 320

View: 5388

The Year that Defined American Journalism explores the succession of remarkable and decisive moments in American journalism during 1897 – a year of significant transition that helped redefine the profession and shape its modern contours. This defining year featured a momentous clash of paradigms pitting the activism of William Randolph Hearst's participatory 'journalism of action' against the detached, fact-based antithesis of activist journalism, as represented by Adolph Ochs of the New York Times, and an eccentric experiment in literary journalism pursued by Lincoln Steffens at the New York Commercial-Advertiser. Resolution of the three-sided clash of paradigms would take years and result ultimately in the ascendancy of the Times' counter-activist model, which remains the defining standard for mainstream American journalism. The Year That Defined American Journalism introduces the year-study methodology to mass communications research and enriches our understanding of a pivotal moment in media history.

Hitlers Klavierspieler

Ernst Hanfstaengl: Vertrauter Hitlers, Verbündeter Roosevelts

Author: Peter Conradi

Publisher: N.A

ISBN: 9783502181378

Category:

Page: 447

View: 3936

Churchill in North America, 1929

A Three Month Tour of Canada and the United States

Author: Bradley P. Tolppanen

Publisher: McFarland

ISBN: 1476615047

Category: History

Page: 272

View: 4935

Churchill took a three-month vacation to North America in the summer and fall of 1929, a little known event in his long career. In the company of his son Randolph, his brother Jack and his nephew Johnny, he toured Canada and the United States. Notable are Churchill’s meetings with political, business, newspaper and entertainment figures (President Hoover, Prime Minister Mackenzie King, Bernard Baruch, William Randolph Hearst, Marion Davies and Charlie Chaplin) as well as his visits to such landmarks as the Grand Canyon, Lake Louise, Niagara Falls and Yosemite. The Churchills also visited a lumber camp, slaughterhouse and steel factory, went fishing on the Pacific Ocean and inspected the battlefields in Quebec and Virginia. They evaded Prohibition and gambled on the stock market (about to crash). It was on this trip that Churchill gained an understanding of the two countries firsthand and deepened his feelings for Canada and the United States.

BusinessWeek

Author: N.A

Publisher: N.A

ISBN: N.A

Category: Business

Page: N.A

View: 5307

Hearst's San Simeon

The Gardens and the Land

Author: Victoria Kastner,Victoria Garagliano

Publisher: Harry N. Abrams

ISBN: N.A

Category: Architecture

Page: 240

View: 8429

A decadeslong collaboration between publisher William Randolph Hearst and architect Julia Morgan produced the formal terraces, swimming pools, and plants and sculptures that occupy the 120 acres of gardens and 450 square miles of coastland of San Simeon, now a California State Park. Their extensive correspondence reveals a captivating working relationship with shared concerns over every aspect of the enormous project. Hearst Castle historian Kastner's (Hearst Castle: The Biography of a Country House) biography of a man and of an estate is also a social study of the periodthe famous and infamous Hollywood figures who peopled the house and its grounds, the lavish lifestyle, and the mythical tales about its owner. The superb photos by Garagliano, photographer at San Simeon since 1994, capture some of the elegant views, the vast array of buildings, and the myriad details. This work of visual delight should whet the appetite for a visit to the real thing.Paula Frosch, Metropolitan Museum of Art Lib., New York Copyright Reed Business Information, a division of Reed Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

Navajo Textiles

The William Randolph Hearst Collection

Author: Nancy J. Blomberg

Publisher: University of Arizona Press

ISBN: 9780816514670

Category: Art

Page: 257

View: 3737

William Randolph Hearst's collection of Navajo textiles is one of the most complete gatherings of nineteenth-century Navajo weaving in the world. Comprising dozens of Classic Period serapes, chief blankets, Germantown eyedazzlers, and turn-of-the-century rugs, the 185-piece collection was donated to the Los Angeles County Museum of Natural History in 1942 but for the next forty years was known only to a handful of scholars. Hearst began acquiring textiles from the Fred Harvey Company after viewing an exhibit of Indian artifacts. Over four decades he amassed a collection spanning more than a century of Navajo weaving and including nearly every major type produced from 1800 to 1920. Hearst's passion for American Indian artifacts was so strong that he had originally visualized his now-famous castle in San Simeon as a showplace for his Navajo textile collection. At a time when the Harvey Company was itself influencing the development of Indian handcrafts by opening up the tourist market, Hearst contributed to this influence by expressing his own artistic preference for rare and unusual pieces. This catalogue raisonnA(c), featuring nearly 200 illustrations, provides the general public with the first look at this important collection. Nancy Blomberg's narrative introduces the reader to the history of Navajo weaving and documents Hearst's role in its development. The heart of the book provides a detailed analysis of each textile: fibers, yarn types, dyes, and designs. Navajo Textiles thus constitutes an invaluable reference for scholars and collectors and will be enjoyed by anyone who appreciates these beautiful creations from the Navajo loom.

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