Search Results: the-debate-on-the-english-reformation

The Debate on the English Reformation

Second Edition

Author: Rosemary O'Day

Publisher: Oxford University Press

ISBN: 0719086620

Category: History

Page: 348

View: 5612

Extensively revised and updated, this new edition of The Debate on the English Reformation combines a discussion of successive historical approaches to the English Reformation with a critical review of recent debates in the area, offering a major contribution to modern historiography as well as to Reformation studies. It explores the way in which successive generations have found the Reformation relevant to their own times and have in the process rediscovered, redefined and rewritten its story. It shows that not only people who called themselves historians but also politicians, ecclesiastics, journalists and campaigners argued about interpretations of the Reformation and the motivations of its principal agents. The author also shows how, in the twentieth century, the debate was influenced by the development of history as a subject and, in the twenty-first century, by state control of the academy. Undergraduates, researchers and lecturers alike will find this an invaluable and essential companion to their studies.

The Debate on the English Reformation

Author: Rosemary O'Day

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 1135835330

Category: History

Page: 235

View: 3613

First published in 2003. Routledge is an imprint of Taylor & Francis, an informa company.

Popular Politics and the English Reformation

Author: Ethan H. Shagan

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

ISBN: 9780521525558

Category: History

Page: 341

View: 4276

A study of popular responses to the English Reformation after Henry VIII's break from Rome.

Clerical Marriage and the English Reformation

Precedent Policy and Practice

Author: Helen L Parish

Publisher: Taylor & Francis

ISBN: 1351950991

Category:

Page: N.A

View: 7221

This volume is an examination of the debate over clerical marriage in Reformation polemic, and of its impact on the English clergy in the second half of the sixteenth century. Clerical celibacy was more than an abstract theological concept; it was a central image of mediaeval Catholicism which was shattered by the doctrinal iconoclasm of Protestant reformers. This study sets the debate over clerical marriage within the context of the key debates of the Reformation, offering insights into the nature of the reformers' attempts to break with the Catholic past, and illustrating the relationship between English polemicists and their continental counterparts. The debate was not without practical consequences, and the author sets this study of polemical arguments alongside an analysis of the response of clergy in several English dioceses to the legalisation of clerical marriage in 1549. Conclusions are based upon the evidence of wills, visitation records, and the proceedings of the ecclesiastical courts. Despite the printed rhetoric, dogmatic certainties were often beyond the reach of the majority, and the author's conclusions highlight the chasm which could exist between polemical ideal and practical reality during the turmoil of the Reformation.

The Eucharistic Debate in Tudor England

Thomas Cranmer, Stephen Gardiner, and the English Reformation

Author: Amanda Wrenn Allen

Publisher: Rowman & Littlefield

ISBN: 149855976X

Category: History

Page: 220

View: 8366

This study examines the sixteenth-century theological debate between Thomas Cranmer and Stephen Gardiner. Through this debate, the author analyzes the development of Anglican Eucharistic doctrine and demonstrates the intimate ties between religion and politics during the English Reformation.

The English Reformation Revised

Author: Christopher Haigh

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

ISBN: 9780521336314

Category: History

Page: 229

View: 5667

Twenty years ago, historians thought they understood the Reformation in England. Professor A. G. Dickens's elegant The English Reformation was then new, and highly influential: it seemed to show how national policy and developing reformist allegiance interacted to produce an acceptable and successful Protestant Reformation. But, since then, the evidence of the statute book, of Protestant propagandists and of heresy trials has come to seem less convincing, Neglected documents, especially the records of diocesan administration and parish life, have been explored, new questions have been asked - and many of the answers have been surprising. Some of the old certainties have been demolished, and many of the assumptions of the old interpretation of the Reformation have been undermined, in a wide-ranging process of revision. But the fruits of the new 'revisionism' are still buried in technical academic journals, difficult for students and teachers to find and to use. There is no up-to-date textbook, no comprehensive new survey, to challenge the orthodoxies enshrined in older works. This volume seeks to fulfill two crucial needs for students of Tudor England. First, it brings together some of the most readable of the recent innovative essays and articles into a single book. Second, it seeks to show how a new 'revisionist' interpretation of the English Reformation can be constructed, and examines its strengths and weaknesses. In short, it is an alternative to a new textbook survey - until someone has time (and courage) to write one. The new Introduction sets out the framework for a new understanding of the Reformation, and shows how already published work can be fitted into it. The nine essays (one printed here for the first time) provide detailed studies of particular problems in Reformation history, and general surveys of the progress of religious change. The new Conclusion tries to plug some of the remaining gaps, and suggests how the Reformation came to divide the English nation. It is a deliberately controversial collection, to be used alongside existing textbooks and to promote rethinking and debate.

The Debate on the English Revolution

Author: R. C. Richardson

Publisher: Manchester University Press

ISBN: 9780719047404

Category: History

Page: 262

View: 5157

This firmly established essential guide to the literature in the field appears here in a much revised third edition. New chapters are included on twentieth-century historians’ treatments of social complexities, politics, political culture and revisionism, and on the Revolution’s unstoppable reverberations. All the other chapters have been amended and recast to take account of recent publications. The book provides a searching re-examination of why the English Revolution remains such a provocatively controversial subject and analyzes the different ways in which historians over the last three centuries have tried to explain its causes, course and consequences. Clarendon, Hume, Macaulay, Gardiner, Tawney, Hill, and the present-day revisionists are given extended treatment, while discussion of the work of numerous other historians is integrated into a coherent, informative and immensely readable survey.

The Reformation of the English Parish Church

Author: Robert Whiting

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

ISBN: 1139486667

Category: History

Page: N.A

View: 646

In the sixteenth century, the people of England witnessed the physical transformation of their most valued buildings: their parish churches. This is the first ever full-scale investigation of the dramatic changes experienced by the English parish church during the English Reformation. By drawing on a wealth of documentary evidence, including court records, wills and church wardens' accounts, and by examining the material remains themselves - such as screens, fonts, paintings, monuments, windows and other artefacts - found in churches today, Robert Whiting reveals how, why and by whom these ancient buildings were transformed. He explores the reasons why Catholics revered the artefacts found in churches as well as why these objects became the subject of Protestant suspicion and hatred in subsequent years. This richly illustrated account sheds new light on the acts of destruction as well as the acts of creation that accompanied religious change over the course of the 'long' Reformation.

English Reformations

Religion, Politics, and Society Under the Tudors

Author: Christopher Haigh

Publisher: Oxford University Press on Demand

ISBN: 0198221622

Category: History

Page: 367

View: 1100

English Reformations takes a refreshing new approach to the study of the Reformation in England. Christopher Haigh's lively and readable study disproves any facile assumption that the triumph of Protestantism was inevitable, and goes beyond the surface of official political policy to explore the religious views and practices of ordinary English people. With the benefit of hindsight, other historians have traced the course of the Reformation as a series of events inescapably culminating in the creation of the English Protestant establishment. Haigh sets out to recreate the sixteenth century as a time of excitement and insecurity, with each new policy or ruler causing the reversal of earlier religious changes. This is a scholarly and stimulating book, which challenges traditional ideas about the Reformation and offers a powerful and convincing alternative analysis.

The Impact of the English Reformation 1500-1640

Author: Peter Marshall

Publisher: Bloomsbury Academic

ISBN: 9780340677094

Category: History

Page: 352

View: 5267

This is a collection of the most important and interesting recent articles on the impact of religious change in England in the sixteenth and early seventeenth centuries. An introduction and sectional commentaries help to guide the reader through the maze of current scholarly debates.

Reformation and the English People

Author: JJ Scarisbrick

Publisher: Wiley-Blackwell

ISBN: 9780631147558

Category: History

Page: 216

View: 8505

The complex web of events which we call the Reformation had a profound and lasting effect on English life. This book is a new attempt to understand how it 'happened' and how English men and women responded to it. Using the evidence of wills and account-books, examining late medieval church building and, above all, the striking popularity of the lay fraternity, Professor Scarisbrick argues that there was little violent discontent with the old Church on the eve of the Reformation - that, on the whole, English layfolk had been able to fashion a Church which suited their needs well enough. The main thrust for the ensuring changes came from 'above' and was rarely accompanied by the fierce anticlericialism and iconoclasm that was often a feature of the continental Reformation. Professor Scarisbrick examines the unparalleled spoliation of religious houses, shrines, colleges, chantries, guilds and parish churches in the years 1536 to 1553, and lay attitudes to it. He argues that the changes encountered more resistance than has often been supposed. The story of what happened to schools and hospitals in Edward VI's reign and the survival and revival of the old faith under (and after) Mary add weight to his arguments. He shows clearly that to describe the Reformation as a victory of layman over cleric is far too simple, and that many of our common assumptions about the Reformation need to be reconsidered.

Seeing Faith, Printing Pictures: Religious Identity during the English Reformation

Author: David J. Davis

Publisher: BRILL

ISBN: 9004236023

Category: History

Page: 260

View: 3381

This book offers a unique analysis of visual religion in Reformation England as seen in its religious printed images. Challenging traditional notions of an iconoclastic Reformation, it offers a thorough analysis of the widespread body of printed images and the ways the images gave shape to the religious culture.

The English Reformation

Author: Gerard Culkin

Publisher: N.A

ISBN: 9780991609826

Category:

Page: 198

View: 941

With precise scholarship and accessible prose, Father Culkin brings the Tudor period to life in thirteen concise episodes, easily digestible in just a few hours reading. This new edition will bring Father Culkin's work to a new generation of readers, with additional scholarship provided by Mike Church, for whom we are to thank for the resurrection of this priceless little gem of historical truth-telling.

Heretics and Believers

A History of the English Reformation

Author: Peter Marshall

Publisher: N.A

ISBN: 9780300234589

Category: History

Page: 672

View: 7045

A sumptuously written people's history and a major retelling and reinterpretation of the story of the English Reformation Centuries on, what the Reformation was and what it accomplished remain deeply contentious. Peter Marshall's sweeping new history--the first major overview for general readers in a generation--argues that sixteenth-century England was a society neither desperate for nor allergic to change, but one open to ideas of "reform" in various competing guises. King Henry VIII wanted an orderly, uniform Reformation, but his actions opened a Pandora's Box from which pluralism and diversity flowed and rooted themselves in English life. With sensitivity to individual experience as well as masterfully synthesizing historical and institutional developments, Marshall frames the perceptions and actions of people great and small, from monarchs and bishops to ordinary families and ecclesiastics, against a backdrop of profound change that altered the meanings of "religion" itself. This engaging history reveals what was really at stake in the overthrow of Catholic culture and the reshaping of the English Church.

The Debate on the Norman Conquest

Author: Marjorie Chibnall

Publisher: Manchester University Press

ISBN: 9780719049132

Category: History

Page: 168

View: 3325

The debate on the Norman Conquest is still ongoing. Because of the great interest that has always been shown in the subject of conquest and its aftermath, interpretations have been numerous and conflicting; students bewildered by controversies may find this book a useful guide through the morass of literature. In the medieval period writers were still deeply involved in the legal and linguistic consequences of the Norman victory. Later the issues became direcly relevant to debates about constitutional rights; the theory of a "Norman yoke" provided first a call for revolution and, by the 19th century, a romantic vision of a lost Saxon paradise. When history became a subject for academic study controversies still raged round such subjects as Saxon versus Norman institutions. These have gradually been replaced in a broader social setting where there is more room for consensus. Interest has now moved to such subjects as peoples and races, frontier societies, women's studies and colonialism. Changing perspectives have shown the advantage of studying a period from the late 10th to the early 13th century rather than one beginning in 1066.

Supremacy and Survival

How Catholics Endured the English Reformation

Author: Stephanie A. Mann

Publisher: Scepter Publishers

ISBN: 1594170797

Category: Religion

Page: 167

View: 6484

English Catholic Historians and the English Reformation, 1585-1954

Author: John Vidmar

Publisher: ISBS

ISBN: 9781845190071

Category: History

Page: 184

View: 8997

For almost 400 years, Roman Catholics have been writing about the English Reformation, but their contributions have been largely ignored by the scholarly world and the reading public. Thus the myths of corrupt monasteries, a "Bloody" Mary, and a "Good" Queen Bess have established themselves in the popular mind. John Vidmar re-examines this literature systematically from the time of the Reformation itself, to the early 1950s, when Philip Hughes produced his monumental Reformation in England. The author introduces all the major historians (and many lesser lights) who have tackled this issue, including: Nicholas Sanders, Charles Dodd, John Lingard, Lord Acton, Aidan Gasquet, and Hilaire Belloc. The book supplies information long missing from the Reformation Debate. In exploring the divergent opinions of Catholic historians, John Vidmar offers a critique of the body of Catholic writing and discovers that, quite simply, there is no Catholic "version" of the English Reformation. By evaluating Catholic historical writing as a whole, he reaches conclusions which have not been hitherto possible by treating individual historians. Patterns and directions of Catholic thought over four centuries are illuminated, and set a basis for a new "revisionism" on the Reformation in England.

The Debate on the Rise of British Imperialism

Author: Anthony Webster

Publisher: Manchester University Press

ISBN: 9780719067938

Category: History

Page: 198

View: 8476

Anthony Webster examines the rise of the British empire and the various debates among historians of imperialism over two hundred years. He discusses why the empire is an attractive subject, why controversy surrounds it, and how different generations of historians have read the episodes in the history of the empire.

Reformation and the Culture of Persuasion

Author: Andrew Pettegree

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

ISBN: 9780521602648

Category: History

Page: 237

View: 3837

A groundbreaking new history of the process of religious conversion during the European Reformation.

Commonwealth and the English Reformation

Protestantism and the Politics of Religious Change in the Gloucester Vale, 1483–1560

Author: Professor Ben Lowe

Publisher: Ashgate Publishing, Ltd.

ISBN: 1409480895

Category: History

Page: 332

View: 4095

Whilst much recent research has dealt with the popular response to the religious change ushered in during the mid-Tudor period, this book focuses not just on the response to broad liturgical and doctrinal change, but also looks at how theological and reform messages could be utilized among local leaders and civic elites. It is this cohort that has often been neglected in previous efforts to ascertain the often elusive position of the common woman or man. Using the Vale of Gloucester as a case study, the book refocuses attention onto the concept of "commonwealth" and links it to a gradual, but long-standing dissatisfaction with local religious houses. It shows how monasteries, endowed initially out of the charitable impulses of elites, increasingly came to depend on lay stewards to remain viable. During the economic downturn of the mid-Tudor period, when urban and landed elites refocused their attention on restoring the commonwealth which they believed had broken down, they increasingly viewed the charity offered by religious houses as insufficient to meet the local needs. In such a climate the Protestant social gospel seemed to provide a valid alternative to which many people gravitated. Holding to scrutiny the “revisionist revolution” of the past twenty years, the book reopens debate and challenges conventional thinking about the ways the traditional church lost influence in the late middle ages, positing the idea that the problems with the religious houses were not just the creation of the reformers but had rather a long history. In so doing it offers a more complete picture of reform that goes beyond head-counting by looking at the political relationships and how they were affected by religious ideas to bring about change.

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