Search Results: the-debate-on-the-english-reformation

The Debate on the English Reformation

Second edition

Author: Rosemary O'Day

Publisher: Oxford University Press

ISBN: 152610167X

Category: History

Page: N.A

View: 5882

Extensively revised and updated, this new edition of The Debate on the English Reformation combines a discussion of successive historical approaches to the English Reformation of the mid-sixteenth-century with a critical review of recent debates in the area, offering a major contribution to modern historiography as well as to Reformation studies. This book explores the way in which successive generations have found the Reformation relevant to their own times and have in the process rediscovered, redefined and rewritten its story. It shows that not only historians but also politicians, ecclesiastics, journalists and social and religious campaigners argued about interpretations of the Reformation and the motivations of its principal agents: Henry VIII, Thomas Cromwell, Anne Boleyn, Thomas Cranmer and Edward VI. The book also presents: John Foxe, the martyrologist, and his contemporary perspective and the work of William Cobbett, the nineteenth-century inflammatory journalist; the persuasive arguments of early nineteenth-century Roman Catholics working for emancipation and the measured, scholarly approach of twentieth-century historians; the fresh perspectives of young scholars in the twentieth-century and of neo-Catholic historians in the twenty-first century as they ask 'was there a Reformation'? The reader will encounter the surprising ways the debate has fared during state control of the universities and be challenged by a discussion of how the Reformation has been presented in novel, play and film. The Debate on the English Reformation delivers a significant contribution to modern political, social and religious historiography and Reformation studies. Undergraduates, researchers and lecturers alike will find it essential.

The Debate on the English Reformation

Author: Rosemary O'Day

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 1135835330

Category: History

Page: 235

View: 8133

First published in 2003. Routledge is an imprint of Taylor & Francis, an informa company.

Popular Politics and the English Reformation

Author: Ethan H. Shagan

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

ISBN: 9780521525558

Category: History

Page: 341

View: 2969

A study of popular responses to the English Reformation after Henry VIII's break from Rome.

Clerical Marriage and the English Reformation

Precedent Policy and Practice

Author: Helen L Parish

Publisher: Taylor & Francis

ISBN: 1351950991

Category:

Page: N.A

View: 4792

This volume is an examination of the debate over clerical marriage in Reformation polemic, and of its impact on the English clergy in the second half of the sixteenth century. Clerical celibacy was more than an abstract theological concept; it was a central image of mediaeval Catholicism which was shattered by the doctrinal iconoclasm of Protestant reformers. This study sets the debate over clerical marriage within the context of the key debates of the Reformation, offering insights into the nature of the reformers' attempts to break with the Catholic past, and illustrating the relationship between English polemicists and their continental counterparts. The debate was not without practical consequences, and the author sets this study of polemical arguments alongside an analysis of the response of clergy in several English dioceses to the legalisation of clerical marriage in 1549. Conclusions are based upon the evidence of wills, visitation records, and the proceedings of the ecclesiastical courts. Despite the printed rhetoric, dogmatic certainties were often beyond the reach of the majority, and the author's conclusions highlight the chasm which could exist between polemical ideal and practical reality during the turmoil of the Reformation.

Beliefs and the Dead in Reformation England

Author: Peter Marshall

Publisher: OUP Oxford

ISBN: 0191542911

Category: History

Page: 356

View: 3737

This is the first comprehensive study of one of the most important aspects of the Reformation in England: its impact on the status of the dead. Protestant reformers insisted vehemently that between heaven and hell there was no 'middle place' of purgatory where the souls of the departed could be assisted by the prayers of those still living on earth. This was no remote theological proposition, but a revolutionary doctrine affecting the lives of all sixteenth-century English people, and the ways in which their Church and society were organized. This book illuminates the (sometimes ambivalent) attitudes towards the dead to be discerned in pre-Reformation religious culture, and traces (up to about 1630) the uncertain progress of the 'reformation of the dead' attempted by Protestant authorities, as they sought both to stamp out traditional rituals and to provide the replacements acceptable in an increasingly fragmented religious world. It also provides detailed surveys of Protestant perceptions of the afterlife, of the cultural meanings of the appearance of ghosts, and of the patterns of commemoration and memory which became characteristic of post-Reformation England. Together these topics constitute an important case-study in the nature and tempo of the English Reformation as an agent of social and cultural transformation. The book speaks directly to the central concerns of current Reformation scholarship, addressing questions posed by 'revisionist' historians about the vibrancy and resilience of traditional religious culture, and by 'post-revisionists' about the penetration of reformed ideas. Dr Marshall demonstrates not only that the dead can be regarded as a significant 'marker' of religious and cultural change, but that a persistent concern with their status did a great deal to fashion the distinctive appearance of the English Reformation as a whole, and to create its peculiarities and contradictory impulses.

Heretics and Believers

A History of the English Reformation

Author: Peter Marshall

Publisher: Yale University Press

ISBN: 0300226330

Category: Religion

Page: 480

View: 6837

A sumptuously written people’s history and a major retelling and reinterpretation of the story of the English Reformation Centuries on, what the Reformation was and what it accomplished remain deeply contentious. Peter Marshall’s sweeping new history—the first major overview for general readers in a generation—argues that sixteenth-century England was a society neither desperate for nor allergic to change, but one open to ideas of “reform” in various competing guises. King Henry VIII wanted an orderly, uniform Reformation, but his actions opened a Pandora’s Box from which pluralism and diversity flowed and rooted themselves in English life. With sensitivity to individual experience as well as masterfully synthesizing historical and institutional developments, Marshall frames the perceptions and actions of people great and small, from monarchs and bishops to ordinary families and ecclesiastics, against a backdrop of profound change that altered the meanings of “religion” itself. This engaging history reveals what was really at stake in the overthrow of Catholic culture and the reshaping of the English Church.

The Impact of the English Reformation 1500-1640

Author: Peter Marshall

Publisher: Bloomsbury Academic

ISBN: 9780340677094

Category: History

Page: 352

View: 3064

This is a collection of the most important and interesting recent articles on the impact of religious change in England in the sixteenth and early seventeenth centuries. An introduction and sectional commentaries help to guide the reader through the maze of current scholarly debates.

The English Reformation Revised

Author: Christopher Haigh

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

ISBN: 9780521336314

Category: History

Page: 229

View: 5419

Twenty years ago, historians thought they understood the Reformation in England. Professor A. G. Dickens's elegant The English Reformation was then new, and highly influential: it seemed to show how national policy and developing reformist allegiance interacted to produce an acceptable and successful Protestant Reformation. But, since then, the evidence of the statute book, of Protestant propagandists and of heresy trials has come to seem less convincing, Neglected documents, especially the records of diocesan administration and parish life, have been explored, new questions have been asked - and many of the answers have been surprising. Some of the old certainties have been demolished, and many of the assumptions of the old interpretation of the Reformation have been undermined, in a wide-ranging process of revision. But the fruits of the new 'revisionism' are still buried in technical academic journals, difficult for students and teachers to find and to use. There is no up-to-date textbook, no comprehensive new survey, to challenge the orthodoxies enshrined in older works. This volume seeks to fulfill two crucial needs for students of Tudor England. First, it brings together some of the most readable of the recent innovative essays and articles into a single book. Second, it seeks to show how a new 'revisionist' interpretation of the English Reformation can be constructed, and examines its strengths and weaknesses. In short, it is an alternative to a new textbook survey - until someone has time (and courage) to write one. The new Introduction sets out the framework for a new understanding of the Reformation, and shows how already published work can be fitted into it. The nine essays (one printed here for the first time) provide detailed studies of particular problems in Reformation history, and general surveys of the progress of religious change. The new Conclusion tries to plug some of the remaining gaps, and suggests how the Reformation came to divide the English nation. It is a deliberately controversial collection, to be used alongside existing textbooks and to promote rethinking and debate.

The Reformation of the English Parish Church

Author: Robert Whiting

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

ISBN: 1139486667

Category: History

Page: N.A

View: 718

In the sixteenth century, the people of England witnessed the physical transformation of their most valued buildings: their parish churches. This is the first ever full-scale investigation of the dramatic changes experienced by the English parish church during the English Reformation. By drawing on a wealth of documentary evidence, including court records, wills and church wardens' accounts, and by examining the material remains themselves - such as screens, fonts, paintings, monuments, windows and other artefacts - found in churches today, Robert Whiting reveals how, why and by whom these ancient buildings were transformed. He explores the reasons why Catholics revered the artefacts found in churches as well as why these objects became the subject of Protestant suspicion and hatred in subsequent years. This richly illustrated account sheds new light on the acts of destruction as well as the acts of creation that accompanied religious change over the course of the 'long' Reformation.

English Reformations

Religion, Politics, and Society Under the Tudors

Author: Christopher Haigh

Publisher: Oxford University Press on Demand

ISBN: 0198221622

Category: History

Page: 367

View: 9319

English Reformations takes a refreshing new approach to the study of the Reformation in England. Christopher Haigh's lively and readable study disproves any facile assumption that the triumph of Protestantism was inevitable, and goes beyond the surface of official political policy to explore the religious views and practices of ordinary English people. With the benefit of hindsight, other historians have traced the course of the Reformation as a series of events inescapably culminating in the creation of the English Protestant establishment. Haigh sets out to recreate the sixteenth century as a time of excitement and insecurity, with each new policy or ruler causing the reversal of earlier religious changes. This is a scholarly and stimulating book, which challenges traditional ideas about the Reformation and offers a powerful and convincing alternative analysis.

The English Reformation

Religion and Cultural Adaption

Author: Norman Jones

Publisher: Wiley-Blackwell

ISBN: 9780631210436

Category: History

Page: 272

View: 3489

This history tells the story of how the English, over three generations, adapted to the religious changes forced upon them by the Reformation and, in doing so, radically reconstructed their culture.

A Reformation Debate

Karlstadt, Emser and Eck on Sacred Images : Three Treatises in Translation

Author: Bryan D. Mangrum,Giuseppe Scavizzi

Publisher: Centre for Reformation and Renaissance Studies

ISBN: 9780969751274

Category: Religion

Page: 125

View: 5057

Reformation and the English People

Author: JJ Scarisbrick

Publisher: Wiley-Blackwell

ISBN: 9780631147558

Category: History

Page: 216

View: 3063

The complex web of events which we call the Reformation had a profound and lasting effect on English life. This book is a new attempt to understand how it 'happened' and how English men and women responded to it. Using the evidence of wills and account-books, examining late medieval church building and, above all, the striking popularity of the lay fraternity, Professor Scarisbrick argues that there was little violent discontent with the old Church on the eve of the Reformation - that, on the whole, English layfolk had been able to fashion a Church which suited their needs well enough. The main thrust for the ensuring changes came from 'above' and was rarely accompanied by the fierce anticlericialism and iconoclasm that was often a feature of the continental Reformation. Professor Scarisbrick examines the unparalleled spoliation of religious houses, shrines, colleges, chantries, guilds and parish churches in the years 1536 to 1553, and lay attitudes to it. He argues that the changes encountered more resistance than has often been supposed. The story of what happened to schools and hospitals in Edward VI's reign and the survival and revival of the old faith under (and after) Mary add weight to his arguments. He shows clearly that to describe the Reformation as a victory of layman over cleric is far too simple, and that many of our common assumptions about the Reformation need to be reconsidered.

The Age of Reformation

The Tudor and Stewart Realms 1485-1603

Author: Alec Ryrie,Professor of the History of Christianity Alec Ryrie

Publisher: Taylor & Francis

ISBN: 1351987208

Category: History

Page: 328

View: 2364

The Age of Reformation charts how religion, politics and social change were always intimately interlinked in the sixteenth century, from the murderous politics of the Tudor court to the building and fragmentation of new religious and social identities in the parishes. In this book, Alec Ryrie provides an authoritative overview of the religious and political reformations of the sixteenth century. This turbulent century saw Protestantism come to England, Scotland and even Ireland, while the Tudor and Stewart monarchs made their authority felt within and beyond their kingdoms more than any of their predecessors. This book demonstrates how this age of reformations produced not only a new religion, but a new politics – absolutist, yet pluralist, populist yet bound by law. This new edition has been fully revised and updated and includes expanded sections on Lollardy and anticlericalism, on Henry VIII’s early religious views, on several of the rebellions which convulsed Tudor England and on unofficial religion, ranging from Elizabethan Catholicism to incipient atheism. Drawing on the most recent research, Alec Ryrie explains why these events took the course they did – and why that course was so often an unexpected and unlikely one. It is essential reading for students of early modern British history and the history of the reformation.

The English Reformation

Author: Gerard Culkin

Publisher: N.A

ISBN: 9780991609826

Category:

Page: 198

View: 1419

With precise scholarship and accessible prose, Father Culkin brings the Tudor period to life in thirteen concise episodes, easily digestible in just a few hours reading. This new edition will bring Father Culkin's work to a new generation of readers, with additional scholarship provided by Mike Church, for whom we are to thank for the resurrection of this priceless little gem of historical truth-telling.

Literature and Politics in the English Reformation

Author: Tom Betteridge

Publisher: Manchester University Press

ISBN: 9780719064609

Category: Literary Collections

Page: 253

View: 1185

This book is a study of the English Reformation as a political and literary event. Focusing on an eclectic group of texts, unified by their explication of the key elements of the cultural history of the period 1510-1580 the book unravels the political, poetic and religious themes of the era. Through readings of work by Edmund Spenser, William Tyndale, Sir Thomas More and John Skelton, as well as less celebrated Tudor writers, Betteridge surveys pre-Henrician literature as well as Henrician Reformation texts, and delineates the literature of the reigns of Edward VI, Mary Tudor and Elizabeth I.

All Things Made New

The Reformation and Its Legacy

Author: Diarmaid MacCulloch

Publisher: Oxford University Press

ISBN: 0190616814

Category: Reformation

Page: 452

View: 3812

"First published in Great Britain by Allen Lane"--Title page verso.

From Icons to Idols

Documents on the Image Debate in Reformation England

Author: David J. Davis

Publisher: N.A

ISBN: 0227906055

Category: Religion

Page: 222

View: 1540

The debate over religious images was fundamental to the development of the Reformation. Even before the Reformation, iconoclasm and the critique of image devotion were marks of religious radicalism. Protestant reformers embraced iconoclasm as a means of condemning Catholic corruption and illustrating their war against idolatry. From Icons to Idols provides an accessible, important edition of primary sources on this critical aspect of the Reformation in England. The documents in this collection track the image debate across the sixteenth and early seventeenth centuries, highlighting the complexities and diversity of arguments and positions held by both Protestants and Catholics. The documents also demonstrate the variety of individuals who engaged in the debate over images. Included here are bishops and theologians, printers and inquisitors, cardinals and artists, suggesting that the question of idolatry was no mere academic exercise.

Commonwealth and the English Reformation

Protestantism and the Politics of Religious Change in the Gloucester Vale, 1483–1560

Author: Ben Lowe

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 135195038X

Category: History

Page: 332

View: 3807

Whilst much recent research has dealt with the popular response to the religious change ushered in during the mid-Tudor period, this book focuses not just on the response to broad liturgical and doctrinal change, but also looks at how theological and reform messages could be utilized among local leaders and civic elites. It is this cohort that has often been neglected in previous efforts to ascertain the often elusive position of the common woman or man. Using the Vale of Gloucester as a case study, the book refocuses attention onto the concept of "commonwealth" and links it to a gradual, but long-standing dissatisfaction with local religious houses. It shows how monasteries, endowed initially out of the charitable impulses of elites, increasingly came to depend on lay stewards to remain viable. During the economic downturn of the mid-Tudor period, when urban and landed elites refocused their attention on restoring the commonwealth which they believed had broken down, they increasingly viewed the charity offered by religious houses as insufficient to meet the local needs. In such a climate the Protestant social gospel seemed to provide a valid alternative to which many people gravitated. Holding to scrutiny the revisionist revolution? of the past twenty years, the book reopens debate and challenges conventional thinking about the ways the traditional church lost influence in the late middle ages, positing the idea that the problems with the religious houses were not just the creation of the reformers but had rather a long history. In so doing it offers a more complete picture of reform that goes beyond head-counting by looking at the political relationships and how they were affected by religious ideas to bring about change.

The English and Their History

Author: Robert Tombs

Publisher: Vintage

ISBN: 1101874775

Category: History

Page: 1040

View: 6707

A New York Times 2016 Notable Book Robert Tombs’s momentous The English and Their History is both a startlingly fresh and a uniquely inclusive account of the people who have a claim to be the oldest nation in the world. The English first came into existence as an idea, before they had a common ruler and before the country they lived in even had a name. They have lasted as a recognizable entity ever since, and their defining national institutions can be traced back to the earliest years of their history. The English have come a long way from those first precarious days of invasion and conquest, with many spectacular changes of fortune. Their political, economic and cultural contacts have left traces for good and ill across the world. This book describes their history and its meanings from their beginnings in the monasteries of Northumbria and the wetlands of Wessex to the cosmopolitan energy of today’s England. Robert Tombs draws out important threads running through the story, including participatory government, language, law, religion, the land and the sea, and ever-changing relations with other peoples. Not the least of these connections are the ways the English have understood their own history, have argued about it, forgotten it and yet been shaped by it. These diverse and sometimes conflicting understandings are an inherent part of their identity. Rather to their surprise, as ties within the United Kingdom loosen, the English are suddenly embarking on a new chapter. The English and Their History, the first single-volume work on this scale for more than half a century, and which incorporates a wealth of recent scholarship, presents a challenging modern account of this immense and continuing story, bringing out the strength and resilience of English government, the deep patterns of division and also the persistent capacity to come together in the face of danger.

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