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The Debate on the English Reformation

Second edition

Author: Rosemary O'Day

Publisher: Oxford University Press

ISBN:

Category: History

Page:

View: 946

Extensively revised and updated, this new edition of The Debate on the English Reformation combines a discussion of successive historical approaches to the English Reformation of the mid-sixteenth-century with a critical review of recent debates in the area, offering a major contribution to modern historiography as well as to Reformation studies. This book explores the way in which successive generations have found the Reformation relevant to their own times and have in the process rediscovered, redefined and rewritten its story. It shows that not only historians but also politicians, ecclesiastics, journalists and social and religious campaigners argued about interpretations of the Reformation and the motivations of its principal agents: Henry VIII, Thomas Cromwell, Anne Boleyn, Thomas Cranmer and Edward VI. The book also presents: John Foxe, the martyrologist, and his contemporary perspective and the work of William Cobbett, the nineteenth-century inflammatory journalist; the persuasive arguments of early nineteenth-century Roman Catholics working for emancipation and the measured, scholarly approach of twentieth-century historians; the fresh perspectives of young scholars in the twentieth-century and of neo-Catholic historians in the twenty-first century as they ask 'was there a Reformation'? The reader will encounter the surprising ways the debate has fared during state control of the universities and be challenged by a discussion of how the Reformation has been presented in novel, play and film. The Debate on the English Reformation delivers a significant contribution to modern political, social and religious historiography and Reformation studies. Undergraduates, researchers and lecturers alike will find it essential.

The Debate on the English Reformation

Author: Rosemary O'Day

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN:

Category: History

Page: 224

View: 493

First published in 2003. Routledge is an imprint of Taylor & Francis, an informa company.

Supremacy and Survival

How Catholics Endured the English Reformation

Author: Stephanie A. Mann

Publisher: Scepter Publishers

ISBN:

Category: Religion

Page: 167

View: 728

Enforcing the English Reformation in Ireland

Clerical Resistance and Political Conflict in the Diocese of Dublin, 1534-1590

Author: James Murray

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

ISBN:

Category: History

Page: 376

View: 803

This text examines the efforts of the Tudor regime to implement the English Reformation in Ireland during the sixteenth century.

Contesting the Reformation

Author: C. Scott Dixon

Publisher: John Wiley & Sons

ISBN:

Category: History

Page: 240

View: 955

Contesting the Reformation provides a comprehensive surveyof the most influential works in the field of Reformation studiesfrom a comparative, cross-national, interdisciplinaryperspective. Represents the only English-language single-authored syntheticstudy of Reformation historiography Addresses both the English and the Continental debates onReformation history Provides a thematic approach which takes in the main trends inmodern Reformation history Draws on the most recent publications relating to Reformationstudies Considers the social, political, cultural, and intellectualimplications of the Reformation and the associated literature

The Debate on the Norman Conquest

Author: Marjorie Chibnall

Publisher: Manchester University Press

ISBN:

Category: History

Page: 168

View: 928

The debate on the Norman Conquest is still ongoing. Because of the great interest that has always been shown in the subject of conquest and its aftermath, interpretations have been numerous and conflicting; students bewildered by controversies may find this book a useful guide through the morass of literature. In the medieval period writers were still deeply involved in the legal and linguistic consequences of the Norman victory. Later the issues became direcly relevant to debates about constitutional rights; the theory of a "Norman yoke" provided first a call for revolution and, by the 19th century, a romantic vision of a lost Saxon paradise. When history became a subject for academic study controversies still raged round such subjects as Saxon versus Norman institutions. These have gradually been replaced in a broader social setting where there is more room for consensus. Interest has now moved to such subjects as peoples and races, frontier societies, women's studies and colonialism. Changing perspectives have shown the advantage of studying a period from the late 10th to the early 13th century rather than one beginning in 1066.

The Senses and the English Reformation

Author: Dr Matthew Milner

Publisher: Ashgate Publishing, Ltd.

ISBN:

Category: History

Page: 430

View: 190

It is a commonly held belief that medieval Catholics were focussed on the 'bells and whistles' of religious practices, the smoke, images, sights and sounds that dazzled pre-modern churchgoers. Protestantism, in contrast, has been cast as Catholicism's austere, intellective and less sensual rival sibling. With iis white-washed walls, lack of incense (and often music) Protestantism worship emphasised preaching and scripture, making the new religion a drab and disengaged sensual experience. In order to challenge such entrenched assumptions, this book examines Tudor views on the senses to create a new lens through which to explore the English Reformation. Divided into two sections, the book begins with an examination of pre-Reformation beliefs and practices, establishing intellectual views on the senses in fifteenth-century England, and situating them within their contemporary philosophical and cultural tensions. Having established the parameters for the role of sense before the Reformation, the second half of the book mirrors these concerns in the post-1520 world, looking at how, and to what degree, the relationship between religious practices and sensation changed as a result of the Reformation. By taking this long-term, binary approach, the study is able to tackle fundamental questions regarding the role of the senses in late-medieval and early modern English Christianity. By looking at what English men and women thought about sight, hearing, smell, taste and touch, the stereotype that Protestantism was not sensual, and that Catholicism was overly sensualised is wholly undermined. Through this examination of how worship was transformed in its textual and liturgical forms, the book illustrates how English religion sought to reflect changing ideas surrounding the senses and their place in religious life. Worship had to be 'sensible', and following how reformers and their opponents built liturgy around experience of the sacred through the physical allows us to tease out the tensions and pressures which shaped religious reform.

Tudors

The History of England

Author: Peter Ackroyd

Publisher: Pan Macmillan

ISBN:

Category: History

Page: 352

View: 120

Following on from Foundation, Tudors is the second volume in Peter Ackroyd's astonishing series, The History of England. Rich in detail and atmosphere and told in vivid prose, Tudors recounts the transformation of England from a settled Catholic country to a Protestant superpower. It is the story of Henry VIII's cataclysmic break with Rome, and his relentless pursuit of both the perfect wife and the perfect heir; of how the brief reign of the teenage king, Edward VI, gave way to the violent reimposition of Catholicism and the stench of bonfires under 'Bloody Mary'. It tells, too, of the long reign of Elizabeth I, which, though marked by civil strife, plots against the queen and even an invasion force, finally brought stability. Above all, however, it is the story of the English Reformation and the making of the Anglican Church. At the beginning of the sixteenth century, England was still largely feudal and looked to Rome for direction; at its end, it was a country where good governance was the duty of the state, not the church, and where men and women began to look to themselves for answers rather than to those who ruled them.

The Debate on the English Revolution

Revisited

Author: R. C. Richardson

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN:

Category: History

Page: 235

View: 835

This firmly established essential guide to the literature in the field appears here in a much revised third edition. New chapters are included on twentieth-century historians' treatments of social complexities, politics, political culture and revisionism, and on the Revolution' s unstoppable reverberations. All the other chapters have been amended and recast to take account of recent publications. The book provides a searching re-examination of why the English Revolution remains such a provocatively controversial subject and analyzes the different ways in which historians over the last three centuries have tried to explain its causes, course and consequences. Clarendon, Hume, Macaulay, Gardiner, Tawney, Hill, and the present-day revisionists are given extended treatment, while discussion of the work of numerous other historians is integrated into a coherent, informative and immensely readable survey.

Clerical Marriage and the English Reformation

Precedent Policy and Practice

Author: Helen L Parish

Publisher: Taylor & Francis

ISBN:

Category:

Page:

View: 119

This volume is an examination of the debate over clerical marriage in Reformation polemic, and of its impact on the English clergy in the second half of the sixteenth century. Clerical celibacy was more than an abstract theological concept; it was a central image of mediaeval Catholicism which was shattered by the doctrinal iconoclasm of Protestant reformers. This study sets the debate over clerical marriage within the context of the key debates of the Reformation, offering insights into the nature of the reformers' attempts to break with the Catholic past, and illustrating the relationship between English polemicists and their continental counterparts. The debate was not without practical consequences, and the author sets this study of polemical arguments alongside an analysis of the response of clergy in several English dioceses to the legalisation of clerical marriage in 1549. Conclusions are based upon the evidence of wills, visitation records, and the proceedings of the ecclesiastical courts. Despite the printed rhetoric, dogmatic certainties were often beyond the reach of the majority, and the author's conclusions highlight the chasm which could exist between polemical ideal and practical reality during the turmoil of the Reformation.

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