Search Results: the-digest-of-justinian-volume-4

The Digest of Justinian

Author: Alan Watson

Publisher: University of Pennsylvania Press

ISBN: 0812205545

Category: History

Page: 768

View: 6220

When Justinian became sole ruler of the Byzantine Empire in A.D. 527, he ordered the preparation of three compilations of Roman law that together formed the Corpus Juris Civilis. These works have become known individually as the Code, which collected the legal pronouncements of the Roman emperors, the Institutes, an elementary student's textbook, and the Digest, by far the largest and most highly prized of the three compilations. The Digest was assembled by a team of sixteen academic lawyers commissioned by Justinian in 533 to cull everything of value from earlier Roman law. It was for centuries the focal point of legal education in the West and remains today an unprecedented collection of the commentaries of Roman jurists on the civil law. Commissioned by the Commonwealth Fund in 1978, Alan Watson assembled a team of thirty specialists to produce this magisterial translation, which was first completed and published in 1985 with Theodor Mommsen's Latin text of 1878 on facing pages. This paperback edition presents a corrected English-language text alone, with an introduction by Alan Watson. Links to the three other volumes in the set: Volume 1 [Books 1-15] Volume 2 [Books 16-29] Volume 3 [Books 30-40]

The Digest of Justinian

Author: Alan Watson

Publisher: University of Pennsylvania Press

ISBN: 0812205529

Category: History

Page: 768

View: 1352

When Justinian became sole ruler of the Byzantine Empire in A.D. 527, he ordered the preparation of three compilations of Roman law that together formed the Corpus Juris Civilis. These works have become known individually as the Code, which collected the legal pronouncements of the Roman emperors, the Institutes, an elementary student's textbook, and the Digest, by far the largest and most highly prized of the three compilations. The Digest was assembled by a team of sixteen academic lawyers commissioned by Justinian in 533 to cull everything of value from earlier Roman law. It was for centuries the focal point of legal education in the West and remains today an unprecedented collection of the commentaries of Roman jurists on the civil law. Commissioned by the Commonwealth Fund in 1978, Alan Watson assembled a team of thirty specialists to produce this magisterial translation, which was first completed and published in 1985 with Theodor Mommsen's Latin text of 1878 on facing pages. This paperback edition presents a corrected English-language text alone, with an introduction by Alan Watson. Links to the three other volumes in the set: Volume 1 [Books 1-15] Volume 3 [Books 30-40] Volume 4 [Books 41-50]

The Digest of Justinian

Author: Alan Watson

Publisher: University of Pennsylvania Press

ISBN: 0812205510

Category: History

Page: 768

View: 6055

When Justinian became sole ruler of the Byzantine Empire in A.D. 527, he ordered the preparation of three compilations of Roman law that together formed the Corpus Juris Civilis. These works have become known individually as the Code, which collected the legal pronouncements of the Roman emperors, the Institutes, an elementary student's textbook, and the Digest, by far the largest and most highly prized of the three compilations. The Digest was assembled by a team of sixteen academic lawyers commissioned by Justinian in 533 to cull everything of value from earlier Roman law. It was for centuries the focal point of legal education in the West and remains today an unprecedented collection of the commentaries of Roman jurists on the civil law. Commissioned by the Commonwealth Fund in 1978, Alan Watson assembled a team of thirty specialists to produce this magisterial translation, which was first completed and published in 1985 with Theodor Mommsen's Latin text of 1878 on facing pages. This paperback edition presents a corrected English-language text alone, with an introduction by Alan Watson. Links to the three other volumes in the set: Volume 2 [Books 16-29] Volume 3 [Books 30-40] Volume 4 [Books 41-50]

The Digest of Justinian

Author: Alan Watson

Publisher: University of Pennsylvania Press

ISBN: 0812205537

Category: History

Page: 768

View: 6129

When Justinian became sole ruler of the Byzantine Empire in A.D. 527, he ordered the preparation of three compilations of Roman law that together formed the Corpus Juris Civilis. These works have become known individually as the Code, which collected the legal pronouncements of the Roman emperors, the Institutes, an elementary student's textbook, and the Digest, by far the largest and most highly prized of the three compilations. The Digest was assembled by a team of sixteen academic lawyers commissioned by Justinian in 533 to cull everything of value from earlier Roman law. It was for centuries the focal point of legal education in the West and remains today an unprecedented collection of the commentaries of Roman jurists on the civil law. Commissioned by the Commonwealth Fund in 1978, Alan Watson assembled a team of thirty specialists to produce this magisterial translation, which was first completed and published in 1985 with Theodor Mommsen's Latin text of 1878 on facing pages. This paperback edition presents a corrected English-language text alone, with an introduction by Alan Watson. Links to the three other volumes in the set: Volume 1 [Books 1-15] Volume 2 [Books 16-29] Volume 4 [Books 41-50]

The Codex of Justinian 3 Volume Hardback Set: A New Annotated Translation, with Parallel Latin and Greek Text

Author: Bruce W. Frier,Serena Connolly,Simon Corcoran,Michael Hewson Crawford,John Noel Dillon,Dennis P. Kehoe,Noel Emmanuel Lenski,Thomas A. J. McGinn,Charles F. Pazdernik,Benet Salway

Publisher: N.A

ISBN: 0521196825

Category: History

Page: 2023

View: 2842

"The Codex of Justinian is, together with the Digest, the core of the great Byzantine compilation of Roman law called the Corpus Iuris Civilis. The Codex gathers legal proclamations issued by Roman Emperors from the second to the sixth centuries C.E. Its influence on subsequent legal development in the Medieval and Early Modern world has been almost incalculable. But the Codex has not, until now, been credibly translated into English. This translation, with a facing Latin and Greek text (from Paul Kruger's ninth edition of the Codex), is based on one made by Justice Fred Blume in the 1920s, but left unpublished for almost a century. It is accompanied by introductions explaining the background of the translation, a bibliography and glossary, and notes that help in understanding the text. Anyone with an interest in the Codex, whether an interested novice or a professional historian, will find ample assistance here"--

Sources of Law, Legal Change, and Ambiguity

Author: Alan Watson

Publisher: University of Pennsylvania Press

ISBN: 151282156X

Category: Language Arts & Disciplines

Page: 192

View: 9626

Why is the law notoriously unclear, arcane, slow to change in the face of changing circumstances? In this sweeping comparative analysis of the lawmaking process from ancient Rome to the present day, Alan Watson argues that the answer has largely to do with the mixed ancestry of modern law, the confusion of sources—custom, legislation, scholarly writing, and judicial precedent—from which it derives.

Justinian's Institutes

Author: Justinian I (Emperor of the East)

Publisher: Cornell University Press

ISBN: 9780801494000

Category: Law

Page: 160

View: 5896

Justinian's Digest

Character and Compilation

Author: Tony Honoré

Publisher: Oxford University Press

ISBN: 0199593302

Category: History

Page: 238

View: 3105

This book collects Honoré's groundbreaking work on the composition of Justinian's Digest, among the most important texts in Roman Law. It reconstructs the methodology of the Digest's composition, and examines the broader issues raised by the Digest's creation - how it was conceived by its compilers, its purpose, and its impact.

Roman Law and the Legal World of the Romans

Author: Andrew M. Riggsby

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

ISBN: 052168711X

Category: History

Page: 283

View: 1090

In this book, Andrew Riggsby surveys the main areas of Roman law, and their place in Roman life.

Roman Law & Comparative Law

Author: Alan Watson

Publisher: University of Georgia Press

ISBN: 9780820312613

Category: Law

Page: 328

View: 2272

Provides a comprehensive description of the system of Roman law, discussing slavery, property, contracts, delicts and succession. Also examines the ways in which Roman law influenced later legal systems such as the structure of European legal systems, tort law in the French civil code, differences between contract law in France and Germany, parameters of judicial reasoning, feudal law, and the interests of governments in making and communicating law.

The History of Medieval Canon Law in the Classical Period, 1140-1234

From Gratian to the Decretals of Pope Gregory IX

Author: Wilfried Hartmann,Kenneth Pennington

Publisher: CUA Press

ISBN: 0813214912

Category: Religion

Page: 442

View: 2642

This latest volume in the ongoing History of Medieval Canon Law series covers the period from Gratian's initial teaching of canon law during the 1120s to just before the promulgation of the Decretals of Pope Gregory IX in 1234.

The Digest of Justinian

Author: William Warwick Buckland

Publisher: N.A

ISBN: N.A

Category: Roman law

Page: 453

View: 469

History of the Wars

Books 5-6 (Gothic War)

Author: Procopius

Publisher: Cosimo, Inc.

ISBN: 1602064962

Category:

Page: 464

View: 2681

"The last major ancient historian, Byzantine scholar PROCOPIUS OF CAESAREA (c. 500565) traveled with the army of Eastern Roman Emperor Justinian I as a military adviser, and chronicled the wars he foughtthis is the primary source today of information about the reign of Justinian I. Here, in Books III and IV of the eight-volume History of the Wars, Procopius tells the story of the Vandalic War between the Eastern Roman Empire and the Vandals in North Africa. Journeying by land and sea, Procopius regales us with vivid tales of battleincluding the capture of Carthage, the famous ancient city and the Vandal capital at the timeand of the intrigues and power struggles that dogged the emperor. Far from dry, this is a thrilling read, one that echoes of this still turbulent region today. Students of the history of the Middle East will be enthralled by this ancient work."

Encyclopedic Dictionary of Roman Law

Author: N.A

Publisher: American Philosophical Society

ISBN: 9780871694324

Category:

Page: 477

View: 9867

The Civil Law:

Author: Justinian I

Publisher: Lulu Press, Inc

ISBN: 1329002555

Category: Law

Page: N.A

View: 8952

The Corpus Juris Civilis or the Body of Civil Law was Complied from 529 to 534 by order of Justinian I; thus, it is sometimes referred to as the Code of Justinian. It however contains the body Roman law previous to the reign of Justinian. This compilation, translated by S.P. Scott into English, and formatted into Three volumes, contains: The Twelve Tables, The Institutes of Gaius, The Rules of Ulpian, The Opinions of Paulus, The Enactments of Justinian, and The Constitutions of Leo

The State, Law, and Religion

Pagan Rome

Author: Alan Watson

Publisher: University of Georgia Press

ISBN: 9780820313870

Category: Law

Page: 136

View: 9810

Written by one of our most respected legal historians, this book analyzes the interaction of law and religion in ancient Rome. As such, it offers a major new perspective on the nature and development of Roman law in the early republic and empire before Christianity was recognized and encouraged by Constantine. At the heart of the book is the apparent paradox that Roman private law is remarkably secular even though, until the late second century B.C., the Romans were regarded (and regarded themselves) as the most religious people in the world. Adding to the paradox was the fact that the interpretation of private law, which dealt with relations between private citizens, lay in the hands of the College of Pontiffs, an advisory body of priests. Alan Watson traces the roots of the paradox--and the way in which Roman law ultimately developed--to the conflict between patricians and plebeians that occurred in the mid-fifth century B.C. When the plebeians demanded equality of all citizens before the law, the patricians prepared in response the Twelve Tables, a law code that included only matters considered appropriate for plebeians. Public law, which dealt with public officials and the governance of the state, was totally excluded form the code, thus preserving gross inequalities between the classes of Roman citizens. Religious law, deemed to be the preserve of patrician priests, was also excluded. As Watson notes, giving a monopoly of legal interpretation to the College of Pontiffs was a shrewd move to maintain patrician advantages; however, a fundamental consequence was that modes of legal reasoning appropriate for judgments in sacred law were carried over to private law, where they were often less appropriate. Such reasoning, Watson contends, persists even in modern legal systems. After sketching the tenets of Roman religion and the content of the Twelve Tables, Watson proceeds to such matters as formalism in religion and law, religion and property, and state religion versus alien religion. In his concluding chapter, he compares the law that emerged after the adoption of the Twelve Tables with the law that reportedly existed under the early Roman kings.

The Spirit of Roman Law

Author: Alan Watson

Publisher: University of Georgia Press

ISBN: 0820330612

Category: Law

Page: 241

View: 5869

This book is not about the rules or concepts of Roman law, says Alan Watson, but about the values and approaches, explicit and implicit, of those who made the law. The scope of Watson's concerns encompasses the period from the Twelve Tables, around 451 B.C., to the end of the so-called classical period, around A.D. 235. As he discusses the issues and problems that faced the Roman legal intelligentsia, Watson also holds up Roman law as a clear, although admittedly extreme, example of law's enormous impact on society in light of society's limited input into law. Roman private law has been the most admired and imitated system of private law in the world, but it evolved, Watson argues, as a hobby of gentlemen, albeit a hobby that carried social status. The jurists, the private individuals most responsible for legal development, were first and foremost politicians and (in the Empire) bureaucrats; their engagement with the law was primarily to win the esteem of their peers. The exclusively patrician College of Pontiffs was given a monopoly on interpretation of private law in the mid fifth century B.C. Though the College would lose its exclusivity and monopoly, interpretation of law remained one mark of a Roman gentleman. But only interpretation of the law, not conceptualization or systematization or reform, gave prestige, says Watson. Further, the jurists limited themselves to particular modes of reasoning: no arguments to a ruling could be based on morality, justice, economic welfare, or what was approved elsewhere. No praetor (one of the elected officials who controlled the courts) is famous for introducing reforms, Watson points out, and, in contrast with a nonjurist like Cicero, no jurist theorized about the nature of law. A strong characteristic of Roman law is its relative autonomy, and isolation from the rest of life. Paradoxically, this very autonomy was a key factor in the Reception of Roman Law--the assimilation of the learned Roman law as taught at the universities into the law of the individual territories of Western Europe.

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