Search Results: the-early-republic-and-antebellum-america-an-encyclopedia-of-social-political-cultural-and-economic-history

The Early Republic and Antebellum America

An Encyclopedia of Social, Political, Cultural, and Economic History

Author: Christopher G. Bates

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 1317457404

Category: History

Page: 1400

View: 2039

First Published in 2015. Routledge is an imprint of Taylor & Francis, an Informa company.

The Early Republic and Antebellum America

An Encyclopedia of Social, Political, Cultural, and Economic History

Author: N.A

Publisher: N.A

ISBN: 9780765681263

Category: United States

Page: 1406

View: 7465

The Early Republic and Antebellum America

An Encyclopedia of Social, Political, Cultural, and Economic History

Author: N.A

Publisher: N.A

ISBN: 9780765681263

Category: United States

Page: 1406

View: 2146

The Encyclopedia of the War of 1812

A Political, Social, and Military History

Author: Spencer Tucker,James R. Arnold,Roberta Wiener,Paul G. Pierpaoli,John C. Fredriksen

Publisher: ABC-CLIO

ISBN: 1851099565

Category: History

Page: 1034

View: 4821

Covers important figures, laws, territories, and battles connected with the War of 1812.

Kentucky Rising

Democracy, Slavery, and Culture from the Early Republic to the Civil War

Author: James Ramage

Publisher: University Press of Kentucky

ISBN: 0813134412

Category: History

Page: 480

View: 4657

Kentucky’s first settlers brought with them a dedication to democracy and a sense of limitless hope about the future. Determined to participate in world progress in science, education, and manufacturing, Kentuckians wanted to make the United States a great nation. They strongly supported the War of 1812, and Kentucky emerged as a model of patriotism and military spirit. Kentucky Rising: Democracy, Slavery, and Culture from the Early Republic to the Civil War offers a new synthesis of the sixty years before the Civil War. James A. Ramage and Andrea S. Watkins explore this crucial but often overlooked period, finding that the early years of statehood were an era of great optimism and progress. Drawing on a wealth of primary and secondary sources, Ramage and Watkins demonstrate that the eyes of the nation often focused on Kentucky, which was perceived as a leader among the states before the Civil War. Globally oriented Kentuckians were determined to transform the frontier into a network of communities exporting to the world market and dedicated to the new republic. Kentucky Rising offers a valuable new perspective on the eras of slavery and the Civil War. This book is a copublication with the Kentucky Historical Society.

Encyclopedia of American cultural and intellectual history

Author: Mary Kupiec Cayton,Peter W. Williams

Publisher: Macmillan Reference USA

ISBN: 9780684805580

Category: History

Page: 876

View: 4100

Women in American History

A Social, Political, and Cultural Encyclopedia and Document Collection

Author: Peg A. Lamphier,Rosanne Welch

Publisher: N.A

ISBN: 9781610696029

Category: Women

Page: N.A

View: 359

Railroads in the Old South

Pursuing Progress in a Slave Society

Author: Aaron W. Marrs

Publisher: JHU Press

ISBN: 9780801898457

Category: Transportation

Page: 288

View: 4483

Railroads in the Old South demonstrates that a simple approach to the Old South fails to do justice to its complexity and contradictions.

Dictionary of Afro-American Slavery

Author: Randall M. Miller,John David Smith

Publisher: Greenwood Publishing Group

ISBN: 9780275957995

Category: History

Page: 892

View: 4634

The acclaimed guide to American slavery, now available to students as well as scholars.

Rhetoric and the Republic

Politics, Civic Discourse, and Education in Early America

Author: Mark Garrett Longaker

Publisher: University of Alabama Press

ISBN: 0817315470

Category: Social Science

Page: 266

View: 5640

Casts a revealing light on modern cultural conflicts through the lens of rhetorical education. Contemporary efforts to revitalize the civic mission of higher education in America have revived an age-old republican tradition of teaching students to be responsible citizens, particularly through the study of rhetoric, composition, and oratory. This book examines the political, cultural, economic, and religious agendas that drove the various—and often conflicting—curricula and contrasting visions of what good citizenship entails. Mark Garrett Longaker argues that higher education more than 200 years ago allowed actors with differing political and economic interests to wrestle over the fate of American citizenship. Then, as today, there was widespread agreement that civic training was essential in higher education, but there were also sharp differences in the various visions of what proper republic citizenship entailed and how to prepare for it. Longaker studies in detail the specific trends in rhetorical education offered at various early institutions—such as Yale, Columbia, Pennsylvania, and William and Mary—with analyses of student lecture notes, classroom activities, disputation exercises, reading lists, lecture outlines, and literary society records. These documents reveal an extraordinary range of economic and philosophical interests and allegiances—agrarian, commercial, spiritual, communal, and belletristic—specific to each institution. The findings challenge and complicate a widely held belief that early-American civic education occurred in a halcyon era of united democratic republicanism. Recognition that there are multiple ways to practice democratic citizenship and to enact democratic discourse, historically as well as today, best serves the goal of civic education, Longaker argues. Rhetoric and the Republic illuminates an important historical moment in the history of American education and dramatically highlights rhetorical education as a key site in the construction of democracy.

Other People's Money

How Banking Worked in the Early American Republic

Author: Sharon Ann Murphy

Publisher: JHU Press

ISBN: 1421421747

Category: Business & Economics

Page: 208

View: 3836

Pieces of paper that claimed to be good for two dollars upon redemption at a distant bank. Foreign coins that fluctuated in value from town to town. Stock certificates issued by turnpike or canal companies—worth something... or perhaps nothing. IOUs from farmers or tradesmen, passed around by people who could not know the person who first issued them. Money and banking in antebellum America offered a glaring example of free-market capitalism run amok—unregulated, exuberant, and heading pell-mell toward the next "panic" of burst bubbles and hard times. In Other People’s Money, Sharon Ann Murphy explains how banking and money worked before the federal government, spurred by the chaos of the Civil War, created the national system of US paper currency. Murphy traces the evolution of banking in America from the founding of the nation, when politicians debated the constitutionality of chartering a national bank, to Andrew Jackson’s role in the Bank War of the early 1830s, to the problems of financing a large-scale war. She reveals how, ultimately, the monetary and banking structures that emerged from the Civil War also provided the basis for our modern financial system, from its formation under the Federal Reserve in 1913 to the present. Touching on the significant role that numerous historical figures played in shaping American banking—including Alexander Hamilton, James Madison, Benjamin Franklin, Henry Clay, Daniel Webster, and Louis Brandeis— Other People’s Money is an engaging guide to the heated political fights that surrounded banking in early America as well as to the economic causes and consequences of the financial system that emerged from the turmoil. By helping readers understand the financial history of this period and the way banking shaped the society in which ordinary Americans lived and worked, this book broadens and deepens our knowledge of the Early American Republic.

The New Encyclopedia of Southern Culture

Volume 1: Religion

Author: Samuel S. Hill

Publisher: Univ of North Carolina Press

ISBN: 0807877166

Category: Reference

Page: 272

View: 2538

Evangelical Protestant groups have dominated religious life in the South since the early nineteenth century. Even as the conservative Protestantism typically associated with the South has risen in social and political prominence throughout the United States in recent decades, however, religious culture in the South itself has grown increasingly diverse. The region has seen a surge of immigration from other parts of the United States as well as from Latin America, Asia, and the Middle East, bringing increased visibility to Catholicism, Islam, and Asian religions in the once solidly Protestant Christian South. In this volume of The New Encyclopedia of Southern Culture, contributors have revised entries from the original Encyclopedia on topics ranging from religious broadcasting to snake handling and added new entries on such topics as Asian religions, Latino religion, New Age religion, Islam, Native American religion, and social activism. With the contributions of more than 60 authorities in the field--including Paul Harvey, Loyal Jones, Wayne Flynt, and Samuel F. Weber--this volume is an accessibly written, up-to-date reference to religious culture in the American South.

A New History of Kentucky

Author: Lowell H. Harrison,James C. Klotter

Publisher: University Press of Kentucky

ISBN: 081313708X

Category: History

Page: 552

View: 519

The first comprehensive history of the state since the publication of Thomas D. Clark's landmark History of Kentucky over sixty years ago. A New History of Kentucky brings the Commonwealth to life, from Pikeville to the Purchase, from Covington to Corbin, this account reveals Kentucky's many faces and deep traditions. Lowell Harrison, professor emeritus of history at Western Kentucky University, is the author of many books, including George Rogers Clark and the War in the West, The Civil War in Kentucky, Kentucky's Road to Statehood, Lincoln of Kentucky, and Kentucky's Governors.

Republic of Taste

Art, Politics, and Everyday Life in Early America

Author: Catherine E. Kelly

Publisher: University of Pennsylvania Press

ISBN: 0812292952

Category: History

Page: 312

View: 1833

Since the early decades of the eighteenth century, European, and especially British, thinkers were preoccupied with questions of taste. Whether Americans believed that taste was innate—and therefore a marker of breeding and station—or acquired—and thus the product of application and study—all could appreciate that taste was grounded in, demonstrated through, and confirmed by reading, writing, and looking. It was widely believed that shared aesthetic sensibilities connected like-minded individuals and that shared affinities advanced the public good and held great promise for the American republic. Exploring the intersection of the early republic's material, visual, literary, and political cultures, Catherine E. Kelly demonstrates how American thinkers acknowledged the similarities between aesthetics and politics in order to wrestle with questions about power and authority. Judgments about art, architecture, literature, poetry, and the theater became an arena for considering political issues ranging from government structures and legislative representation to qualifications for citizenship and the meaning of liberty itself. Additionally, if taste prompted political debate, it also encouraged affinity grounded in a shared national identity. In the years following independence, ordinary women and men reassured themselves that taste revealed larger truths about an individual's character and potential for republican citizenship. Did an early national vocabulary of taste, then, with its privileged visuality, register beyond the debates over the ratification of the Constitution? Did it truly extend beyond political and politicized discourse to inform the imaginative structures and material forms of everyday life? Republic of Taste affirms that it did, although not in ways that anyone could have predicted at the conclusion of the American Revolution.

The Market Revolution

Jacksonian America, 1815-1846

Author: Charles Sellers

Publisher: Oxford University Press

ISBN: 0199762422

Category: History

Page: 512

View: 4489

In The Market Revolution, one of America's most distinguished historians offers a major reinterpretation of a pivotal moment in United States history. Based on impeccable scholarship and written with grace and style, this volume provides a sweeping political and social history of the entire period from the diplomacy of John Quincy Adams to the birth of Mormonism under Joseph Smith, from Jackson's slaughter of the Indians in Georgia and Florida to the Depression of 1819, and from the growth of women's rights to the spread of the temperance movement. Equally important, he offers a provocative new way of looking at this crucial period, showing how the boom that followed the War of 1812 ignited a generational conflict over the republic's destiny, a struggle that changed America dramatically. Sellers stresses throughout that democracy was born in tension with capitalism, not as its natural political expression, and he shows how the massive national resistance to commercial interests ultimately rallied around Andrew Jackson. An unusually comprehensive blend of social, economic, political, religious, and cultural history, this accessible work provides a challenging analysis of this period, with important implications for the study of American history as a whole. It will revolutionize thinking about Jacksonian America.

Why Parties?

A Second Look

Author: John H. Aldrich

Publisher: University of Chicago Press

ISBN: 0226012751

Category: Political Science

Page: 400

View: 6697

Since its first appearance fifteen years ago, Why Parties? has become essential reading for anyone wishing to understand the nature of American political parties. In the interim, the party system has undergone some radical changes. In this landmark book, now rewritten for the new millennium, John H. Aldrich goes beyond the clamor of arguments over whether American political parties are in resurgence or decline and undertakes a wholesale reexamination of the foundations of the American party system. Surveying critical episodes in the development of American political parties—from their formation in the 1790s to the Civil War—Aldrich shows how they serve to combat three fundamental problems of democracy: how to regulate the number of people seeking public office, how to mobilize voters, and how to achieve and maintain the majorities needed to accomplish goals once in office. Aldrich brings this innovative account up to the present by looking at the profound changes in the character of political parties since World War II, especially in light of ongoing contemporary transformations, including the rise of the Republican Party in the South, and what those changes accomplish, such as the Obama Health Care plan. Finally, Why Parties? A Second Look offers a fuller consideration of party systems in general, especially the two-party system in the United States, and explains why this system is necessary for effective democracy.

Working People, Fifth Edition

An Illustrated History of the Canadian Labour Movement

Author: Desmond Morton

Publisher: McGill-Queen's Press - MQUP

ISBN: 0773575545

Category: History

Page: 424

View: 7051

Desmond Morton highlights the great events of labour history -- the 1902 meeting that enabled international unions to dominate Canadian unionism for seventy years, the Winnipeg General Strike of 1919, and an obscure 1944 order-in-council that became the charter of labour's rights and freedoms. He looks at the "new model" unions that used their members' dues and savings to fight powerful employers and describes the romantic idealism of the Knights of Labor in the 1880s, one of the most dramatic and visionary movements ever to seize the Canadian imagination. He recounts the desperate struggles of miners, loggers, and fishers to protect themselves from both employers and the dangers of their work. Working People explores the clash between idealists, who fought for such impossible dreams as an eight-hour day, socialism, holidays with pay, industrial democracy, and equality for women and men, and the realists who wrestled with the human realities of self-interest, prejudice, and fear. Morton tells us about Canadians who deserve to be better known, such as Phillips Thompson, Helena Gutteridge, Lynn Williams, Huguette Plamondon, Mabel Marlowe, Madeleine Parent, and a hundred others whose struggle to reconcile idealism and reality shaped Canada more than they would ever know. This new edition brings the book up to date with discussions of globalization and its challenge to nationally based workers' organizations.

Narrative of the Life of Frederick Douglass, an American Slave

Author: Frederick Douglass

Publisher: N.A

ISBN: N.A

Category: Abolitionists

Page: 122

View: 5895

The Union at Risk

Jacksonian Democracy, States' Rights, and the Nullification Crisis

Author: Richard E. Ellis

Publisher: Oxford University Press on Demand

ISBN: 019506187X

Category: Art

Page: 267

View: 4139

The Nullification Crisis of 1832-33 is undeniably the most important major event of Andrew Jackson's two presidential terms. Attempting to declare null and void the high tariffs enacted by Congress in the late 1820s, the state of South Carolina declared that it had the right to ignore those national laws that did not suit it. Responding swiftly and decisively, Jackson issued a Proclamation reaffirming the primacy of the national government and backed this up with a Force Act, allowing him to enforce the law with troops. Although the conflict was eventually allayed by a compromise fashioned by Henry Clay, the Nullification Crisis raises paramount issues in American political history. The Union at Risk studies the doctrine of states' rights and illustrates how it directly affected national policy at a crucial point in 19th-century politics. Ellis also relates the Nullification Crisis to other major areas of Jackson's administration--his conflict with the National Bank, his Indian policy, and his relationship with the Supreme Court--providing keen insight into the most serious sectional conflict before the Civil War.

The Civil War and Reconstruction

A Student Companion

Author: William L. Barney

Publisher: Student Companions to American

ISBN: 9780195115598

Category: History

Page: 368

View: 4782

Entries describing the causes, events, weapons, leaders, and other developments of the Civil War and Reconstruction are accompanied by lists of dates and of museums and historic sites.

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