Search Results: the-fate-of-liberty

The Fate of Liberty

Abraham Lincoln and Civil Liberties

Author: Mark E. Neely Jr.

Publisher: Oxford University Press

ISBN: 0199923485

Category: History

Page: 304

View: 8937

If Abraham Lincoln was known as the Great Emancipator, he was also the only president to suspend the writ of habeas corpus. Indeed, Lincoln's record on the Constitution and individual rights has fueled a century of debate, from charges that Democrats were singled out for harrassment to Gore Vidal's depiction of Lincoln as an "absolute dictator." Now, in the Pulitzer Prize-winning The Fate of Liberty, one of America's leading authorities on Lincoln wades straight into this controversy, showing just who was jailed and why, even as he explores the whole range of Lincoln's constitutional policies. Mark Neely depicts Lincoln's suspension of habeas corpus as a well-intentioned attempt to deal with a floodtide of unforeseen events: the threat to Washington as Maryland flirted with secession, disintegrating public order in the border states, corruption among military contractors, the occupation of hostile Confederate territory, contraband trade with the South, and the outcry against the first draft in U.S. history. Drawing on letters from prisoners, records of military courts and federal prisons, memoirs, and federal archives, he paints a vivid picture of how Lincoln responded to these problems, how his policies were actually executed, and the virulent political debates that followed. Lincoln emerges from this account with this legendary statesmanship intact--mindful of political realities and prone to temper the sentences of military courts, concerned not with persecuting his opponents but with prosecuting the war efficiently. In addition, Neely explores the abuses of power under the regime of martial law: the routine torture of suspected deserters, widespread antisemitism among Union generals and officials, the common practice of seizing civilian hostages. He finds that though the system of military justice was flawed, it suffered less from merciless zeal, or political partisanship, than from inefficiency and the friction and complexities of modern war. Informed by a deep understanding of a unique period in American history, this incisive book takes a comprehensive look at the issues of civil liberties during Lincoln's administration, placing them firmly in the political context of the time. Written with keen insight and an intimate grasp of the original sources, The Fate of Liberty offers a vivid picture of the crises and chaos of a nation at war with itself, changing our understanding of this president and his most controversial policies.

The Fate of Eloquence in the Age of Hume

Author: Adam Potkay

Publisher: Cornell University Press

ISBN: 1501732102

Category: Language Arts & Disciplines

Page: 264

View: 4921

Potkay explains the sense of urgency that the concept of eloquence evoked among eighteenth-century British readers, for whom it recalled Demosthenes exhorting Athenian citizens to oppose tyranny. Revived by Hume and many other writers, the concept of eloquence resonated deeply for an audience who perceived its own political community as being in danger of disintegration. Potkay also shows how, beginning in the realm of literature, the fashion of polite style began to eclipse that of political eloquence. An ethos suitable both to the family circle and to a public sphere that included women, "politeness" entailed a sublimation of passions, a "feminine" modesty as opposed to "masculine" display, and a style that sought rather to placate or stabilize than to influence the course of events.

The Fate Of A Crown

Author: L. Frank Baum,Schuyler Stanton

Publisher: Jazzybee Verlag

ISBN: 3849643689

Category: Fiction

Page: 178

View: 2512

The Fate of a Crown, written by the famous "Oz" author L. Frank Baum under the alias of Schuyler Staunton is a stirring novel of the events of a South American revolution. A young man just out of college goes to Brazil as secretary of the prime mover in the revolution, and by so doing begins a series of adventures that run from tragic to comic, ending with the success of the conspiracy, a straightening out of many tangles, and the marriage of the hero to one of the most brilliant and beautiful conspirators. A most readable book.

The Fate of Favourites, Exemplified in the Fall of Villiers, Duke of Buckingham (Prime Minister to Their Majesties King James and King Charles I) who was Stabbed by Felton, August 23, 1628

Author: N.A

Publisher: N.A

ISBN: N.A

Category:

Page: 112

View: 6134

The Freeholder's Alarm to His Brethren: Or, The Fate of Britain Determin'd by the Ensuing Election..

Author: N.A

Publisher: N.A

ISBN: N.A

Category: Elections

Page: 64

View: 9813

The Fate of America

An Inquiry Into National Character

Author: Michael Gellert

Publisher: Potomac Books, Inc.

ISBN: 1574884719

Category: Political Science

Page: 366

View: 2382

From the Founding Fathers and the legendary frontiersmen and cowboys, to astronauts, athletes, and other contemporary heroes, Michael Gellert profiles the development of the American heroic ideal. This central component of our national character is examined against the backdrop of three centuries of American history. He reveals how this principle has expressed the nation's aspiration toward greatness and its sense of identity and purpose. He describes how our national character influenced this ideal and pinpoints what has caused it to go awry.

Reflections on the fate of a petition for relief in the matter of subscription, offered to the honourable House of commons, February 6th, 1772. With observations on dean Tucker's Apology for the present Church of England, by a member of a law-society [F. Blackburne].

Author: Francis Blackburne,Josiah Tucker

Publisher: N.A

ISBN: N.A

Category:

Page: N.A

View: 5341

Spheres of Liberty

Changing Perceptions of Liberty in American Culture

Author: Michael G. Kammen

Publisher: Univ. Press of Mississippi

ISBN: 9781604736700

Category: Liberty

Page: 220

View: 4431

Liberty, one of the most consequential words in our language, is one of the most treasured concepts in American thought--and one of the most intensely debated. Its meaning is constantly shifting, changing not only from one culture to another but also, over time, within the same culture. No two definitions of liberty seem alike. In this subtle and illuminating work Michael Kammen traces the evolving concept of liberty throughout American history and provides a solid framework for understanding the meaning of the term today. He shows that by the early seventeenth century a tension between liberty and authority was well recognized. Throughout the eighteenth century and especially during the American Revolution a bond between liberty and property was asserted. By the end of the eighteenth century this concept of liberty was so well established that it remained dominant throughout the nineteenth. By the early twentieth century, as the notion of social justice gained prominence, liberty and justice were paired frequently, and by midcentury the two had become allied to general American values. Since the 1960s the union of liberty and equality has been the prevailing notion, and achieving them has proved a major objective. In a lively and learned manner Kammen also shows that Americans have subscribed to different definitions of liberty concurrently. Above all, there has been a steady expansion of what is embraced by the concept of liberty. This expansion has created difficulties in public discourse, causing groups to misunderstand one another. On the other hand, interpretations of liberty have broadened to include such concepts as constraints on authority, a right to privacy, and the protection of personal freedoms. In a new preface for this Banner Books edition Kammen responds to evaluations of earlier editions and places his views within the context of more recent studies. Michael Kammen, a professor of American history and culture at Cornell University, is the author of "American Culture, American Tastes: Social Change and the 20th Century" and "In the Past Lane: Historical Perspectives on American Culture."

Civil Society, Philanthropy, and the Fate of the Commons

Author: Bruce R. Sievers

Publisher: UPNE

ISBN: 1584658959

Category: History

Page: 205

View: 2180

Traces the historical development of civil society and philanthropy in the West and analyzes their role in solving the problems faced by modern liberal democracy

The Fate of Texas

The Civil War and the Lone Star State

Author: Charles D. Grear

Publisher: University of Arkansas Press

ISBN: 9781610751476

Category: History

Page: 272

View: 2782

In its examination of a state too often neglected by Civil War historians, The Fate of Texas presents Texas as a decidedly Southern, yet in many ways unusual, state seriously committed to and deeply affected by the Confederate war effort in a multitude of ways. When the state joined the Confederacy and fought in the war, its fate was uncertain. The war touched every portion of the population and all aspects of life in Texas. Never before has a group of historians examined the impact of the war on so many facets of the state.

History of Liberty ...

Author: N.A

Publisher: N.A

ISBN: N.A

Category: Church history

Page: N.A

View: 7739

Liberty in Hume’s History of England

Author: N. Capaldi,D. Livingston

Publisher: Springer Science & Business Media

ISBN: 9400905351

Category: Philosophy

Page: 240

View: 6132

LIBERTY IN HUME'S HISTORY OF ENGLAND In his own lifetime, Hume was feted by his admirers as a great historian, and even his enemies conceded that he was a controversial historian with whom one had to reckon. On the other hand, Hume failed to achieve positive recognition for his philosophical views. It was Hume's History of England that played an influential role in public policy debate during the eighteenth century in both Great Britain and in the United States. Hume's Hist01Y of England passed through seven editions and was beginning to be perceived as a classic before Hume's death. Voltaire, as an historian, considered it "perhaps the best ever written in any lan guage. " Gibbon greatly admired Hume's work and said, of a letter written by Hume in 1776 praising the Decline and Fall of the Roman Empire, that a compliment from Hume "overpaid the labor of ten years. " After Hume's death on August 20, 1776, the History became a factor in the revolutionary events that began to unfold. Louis XVI was a close student of Hume's History, and his valet records that, upon having learned that the Convention had voted the death penalty, the King asked for the volume in Hume's History covering the trial and execution of Charles I to read in the days that remained. But if Louis XVI found the consolations of philosophical history in the Stuart volumes, Thomas Jefferson saw in them a cause for alarm.

Defenders of Liberty

African Americans in the Revolutionary War

Author: Lt. Col. Michale Lanning

Publisher: Kensington Publishing Corp.

ISBN: 0806536616

Category: History

Page: 239

View: 4973

THEY WERE CONQUERERS. LIBERATORS. HEROES. MADMEN.ALL CHANGED THE WORLD FOREVER ON THE FIELD OF BATTLE This compelling study by Lt. Col. Michael Lee Lanning (U.S. Army, Ret.) lists the hundred most influential military leaders not by their victories, their combat prowess, or even their legacies, but by the lasting impact that their lives had upon the world, the lives they affected, and the historical significance of their actions in war. Warriors from every corner of the globe and every era are profiled, both glorious and notorious, modern and ancient, good and evil, including: George Washington Attila the Hun Adolf Hitler Napoleon Hannibal Alexander the Great H. Norman Schwarzkopf Ghengis Khan George S. Patton Sun Tzu Oliver CromwellILLUSTRATED WITH PHOTOS AND PORTRAITS Lt. Col. Michael Lee Lanning (U.S. Army, Ret.) served as public affairs officer for General H. Norman Schwarzkopf. He has spent more than twenty years on active duty in the U.S. Army. He is a decorated veteran of the Vietnam War, in which he served as an infantry platoon leader and a company commander. The author of twelve books, Lanning lives in Phoenix, Arizona.

The Fate of Freedom Elsewhere

Human Rights and U.S. Cold War Policy toward Argentina

Author: William Michael Schmidli

Publisher: Cornell University Press

ISBN: 0801469619

Category: History

Page: 256

View: 8546

During the first quarter-century of the Cold War, upholding human rights was rarely a priority in U.S. policy toward Latin America. Seeking to protect U.S. national security, American policymakers quietly cultivated relations with politically ambitious Latin American militaries—a strategy clearly evident in the Ford administration’s tacit support of state-sanctioned terror in Argentina following the 1976 military coup d’état. By the mid-1970s, however, the blossoming human rights movement in the United States posed a serious threat to the maintenance of close U.S. ties to anticommunist, right-wing military regimes. The competition between cold warriors and human rights advocates culminated in a fierce struggle to define U.S. policy during the Jimmy Carter presidency. In The Fate of Freedom Elsewhere, William Michael Schmidli argues that Argentina emerged as the defining test case of Carter’s promise to bring human rights to the center of his administration’s foreign policy. Entering the Oval Office at the height of the kidnapping, torture, and murder of tens of thousands of Argentines by the military government, Carter set out to dramatically shift U.S. policy from subtle support to public condemnation of human rights violation. But could the administration elicit human rights improvements in the face of a zealous military dictatorship, rising Cold War tension, and domestic political opposition? By grappling with the disparate actors engaged in the struggle over human rights, including civil rights activists, second-wave feminists, chicano/a activists, religious progressives, members of the New Right, conservative cold warriors, and business leaders, Schmidli utilizes unique interviews with U.S. and Argentine actors as well as newly declassified archives to offer a telling analysis of the rise, efficacy, and limits of human rights in shaping U.S. foreign policy in the Cold War.

American Serfdom Vs. Eternal Vigilance Is the Price of Liberty

Author: Bridger Daquan

Publisher: Trafford Publishing

ISBN: 1426937466

Category: Religion

Page: 164

View: 5765

The citizens of the United States are being held hostage by international banking cartels, the Federal Reserve System, and fundamentalist Christian views. In American Serfdom vs. Eternal Vigilance is the Price of Liberty, author Bridger Daquan searches for the truth and explores this topic by examining the history and the issues that have led to this serfdom. In this serious discussion, Daquan advocates disbanding the Federal Reserve System, which was established in 1913. He recommends that the United States, its leaders, and its citizens remain true to the countrys original founding documents including the Declaration of Independence, the Constitution, and the Bill of Rights. American Serfdom vs. Eternal Vigilance is the Price of Liberty strongly urges United States citizens and its leaders to oppose a one world banking and currency system that will destroy the Constitution and the principles identified in the nations founding documents. Daquan seeks to avoid the enslavement of the American people.

Democracy Without Nations?

The Fate of Self-government in Europe

Author: Pierre Manent

Publisher: Intercollegiate Studies Institute

ISBN: N.A

Category: Political Science

Page: 109

View: 9259

In this pithy and eloquent essay, the eminent French political philosopher Pierre Manent raises the alarm on the dangers attending the “depoliticization” of contemporary Europe—that is, the dangers of reducing the human world to the single desideratum of maximizing individual and social rights. Europeans, he suggests, increasingly wish to escape from the “national form” that welcomed and nourished democracy in the first place. In place of territorial democracy, which made possible liberty and self-government, Europeans have increasingly succumbed to a “confused idea of human unity” that effaces all the mediations between the individual and the “world.” In Democracy without Nations? Manent takes powerful aim at this new, distinctively European form of “democratic governance,” which neither truly represents nor governs the individuals whose rights it aims to maximize. Manent's book has implications far beyond intra-European debates about the future of European democracy. It provides the richest available reflection on the political forms that make the exercise of self-government possible. It shows that the consent of the individual must be balanced by a broader cultivation of that “communion”—both civic and religious—which informs every authentically human community. And it provides a comparative critique of the relationship between religion and politics in the Islamic, Jewish, and Christian traditions. Manent provocatively suggests, in fact, that the liberal state and the Christian nation go hand-in-hand. The “spiritual vacuity” that characterizes today's secular Europe, he asserts, is ultimately untenable. Europeans therefore must come to terms with the Christian character of their nations if those nations—and if the moral substance of Western liberty—is to survive.

The Fate of the Nation-state

Author: Michel Seymour

Publisher: McGill-Queen's Press - MQUP

ISBN: 9780773526860

Category: Political Science

Page: 441

View: 6873

Are Nation-states obsolete? Are multination states viable? Can we really create powerful supranational institutions? These are the questions that celebrated authors and specialists attempt to answer in this important collection of articles. The work contains theoretical essays and case studies by philosophers, sociologists, political scientists and governmental analysts that provide state of the art analyses of the situation of the nation-state as it is developing all over the world in the new millennium. There are different concepts of nationhood and different forms of national consciousness: ethnic, civic, cultural, socio-political and diasporic. There are also different ways for nations to be present on any given territory; as immigrant groups, as extensions of neighbouring national majorities, as minority nations or as majority nations. There are also different policies adopted toward different groups: bilingualism, multiculturalism, interculturalism, collective rights, etc. Finally, there are different sorts of political arrangements: nation-state, multination state, confederation of sovereign states, multinational federation, federation of nation-states, supranational institutions, etc. The enormous complexity of these issues explain why nations, nationalism and nation-states have been so difficult to understand. The theoretical essays contained in this volume are sensitive to all those issues. The authors examine the foundations of nationalist thinking and the justifications behind the nation-state model. They also reflect upon the nation building policies, politics of recognition and issues related to globalization. The case studies investigate countries or regions such as Ireland, Scotland, Catalonia, the Balkans, Russia, USA, Finland, India, Indonesia, the European Union and Canada.

The Promises of Liberty

The History and Contemporary Relevance of the Thirteenth Amendment

Author: Alexander Tsesis

Publisher: Columbia University Press

ISBN: 0231520131

Category: History

Page: 448

View: 7557

In these original essays, America's leading historians and legal scholars reassess the ratification of the Thirteenth Amendment and its relevance to issues of liberty, justice, and equality. The Thirteenth Amendment abolished slavery in the United States, reasserting the radical, egalitarian dimensions of the Constitution. It also laid the foundations for future civil rights and social justice legislation. Yet subsequent reinterpretation and misappropriation have curbed more substantive change. With constitutional jurisprudence undergoing a revival, The Promises of Liberty provides a full portrait of the Thirteenth Amendment and its potential for ensuring liberty. The collection begins with Pulitzer Prize-winning historian David Brion Davis, who discusses the failure of the Thirteenth Amendment to achieve its framers' objectives. The next piece, by Alexander Tsesis, provides a detailed account of the Amendment's revolutionary character. James M. McPherson, another Pulitzer recipient, recounts the influence of abolitionists on the ratification process, and Paul Finkelman focuses on who freed the slaves and President Lincoln's commitment to ending slavery. Michael Vorenberg revisits the nineteenth century's understanding of freedom and citizenship and the Amendment's surprisingly small role in the Reconstruction and post-Reconstruction periods. William M. Wiecek shows how the Supreme Court's narrow interpretation once rendered the guarantee of freedom nearly illusory, and the collection's third Pulitzer Prize winner, David M. Oshinsky, explains how peonage undermined the prohibition against compulsory service. Subsequent essays relate the Thirteenth Amendment to congressional authority, hate crimes legislation, the labor movement, and immigrant rights. These chapters analyze unique features of the amendment along with its elusive meanings and affirm its power to reform criminal and immigration law, affirmative action policies, and the protection of civil liberties.

The Demands of Liberty

Civil Society in France Since the Revolution

Author: Pierre Rosanvallon,Professor of Political History Pierre Rosanvallon

Publisher: Harvard University Press

ISBN: 9780674024960

Category: History

Page: 354

View: 9434

How does France reconcile the modern movement toward pluralism and decentralization with a strong central governing power? One of the country's most distinguished political historians offers a radical new interpretation of the development of democracy in France and the relationship between government and its citizens. Since the publication of Tocqueville's Ancient Regime and the Revolution, French political structures have been viewed as the pure expression of a native Jacobinism, itself the continuation of an old absolutism. This interpretation has served as both a diagnosis of and an excuse for the inability to accept pluralism and decentralization as norms of a modern democracy, as evidenced in such policies as the persistence of the role of prefects and the ban on headscarves in schools. Pierre Rosanvallon, by contrast, argues that the French have cherished and demonized Jacobinism at the same time; their hearts followed Robespierre, but their heads turned toward Benjamin Constant. The Demands of Liberty traces the long history of resistance to Jacobinism, including the creation of associations and unions and the implementation of elements of decentralization. Behind the ideological triumph of the state lies the conflicting creation of an active civil society. In exploring these tensions, Rosanvallon takes the debate far beyond traditional views of liberalism versus republicanism and offers an innovative analysis of why the French system has worked despite Jacobinism.

The Color of Liberty

Histories of Race in France

Author: Sue Peabody

Publisher: Duke University Press

ISBN: 9780822331179

Category: History

Page: 384

View: 7173

DIVTraces the multiple histories of race and racial thinking over time in France and in Francophone areas of the globe./div

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